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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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March 2009 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: April 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for March 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Safe Practice Scores Do Not Add Up to Fewer Patient Deaths

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitals, higher self-reported scores for improvements in safe practices do not correlate with reduced mortality rates, researchers report in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sample of Obese Subjects Led Very Sedentary Lives

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In a small sample of morbidly obese individuals, their extremely sedentary lifestyles fell far short of common activity guidelines for cardiovascular protection, according to research published online March 19 in Clinical Cardiology.

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Social Isolation Worsens Stroke Outcomes in Mouse Study

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Mice housed in isolation are more likely to experience major ischemic damage and die of a stroke than their socially housed cohorts, according to research published online March 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Reduced Platelet Reactivity After Adjunctive Cilostazol

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing coronary stenting who develop high post-treatment platelet reactivity (HPPR), adjunctive cilostazol reduces platelet aggregation better than maintenance clopidogrel, researchers report in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Post-Exercise Heart Rhythm Predicts Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Visible beat-to-beat alterations in cardiac repolarization known as T-wave alternans (TWA) predict the risk of cardiovascular disease and death in patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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ACCF/AHA Update Covers Heart Failure in Adults

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Updated American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines on heart failure in adults include new recommendations for hospitalized patients, and the guidelines were published online March 26 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lung Hypertension Common in Heart Failure Patients

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure may be effective in diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and predicting the risk of death, researchers report in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Most US Adults Should Reduce Sodium Intake

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults are in groups at high risk of hypertension and should reduce their sodium intake to less than a teaspoon of salt a day, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in the March 27 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Routine Tests Can Induce Stress Cardiomyopathy

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Routine procedures and tests using catecholamines and beta-receptor agonists can precipitate stress cardiomyopathy, according to study findings released online March 25 in advance of publication in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hundred Steps Per Minute May Be Good Fitness Goal

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Taking 3,000 steps in 30 minutes on most days of the week might be a good pace for people to follow to protect their health, according to research published online March 17 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Electric Current Leak Can Trigger Defibrillator Shock

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- An electric current leak that is not noticeable under ordinary circumstances can trigger a serious shock in someone who has an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), according to a letter in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cost Barriers Slow Adoption of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Citing cost barriers, relatively few U.S. hospitals have adopted electronic health records, posing a major obstacle for policy makers who say health information technology is critical to the improvement of health care quality and cost-effectiveness, according to an article published online March 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Low Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Show CAD Benefits

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), those with the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and systolic blood pressure had the slowest progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Elevated Triglycerides Common Among U.S. Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among U.S. adults, hypertriglyceridemia is a common condition associated with physical inactivity, overweight or obesity. But the overwhelming majority of adults with hypertriglyceridemia are not receiving medical treatment for it, according to research published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Genetic Heart Disease Often Deadly for Children

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic cardiomyopathy that strikes children is associated with serious heart dysfunction and often death, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Family History Linked to First Venous Thrombosis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of venous thrombosis is independently associated with an up to quadrupled risk of a first venous thrombosis, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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High Meat Consumption Linked to Higher Death Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People who consume large amounts of red and processed meats have a higher risk of death, particularly from cancer and cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Switching Anticonvulsant Drugs Cuts Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Switching to anticonvulsant drugs that don't activate cytochrome P450 enzymes can improve blood cholesterol levels and lower cardiovascular risk in epilepsy patients, according to research published online March 18 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Restenosis Similar With Stent

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Restenosis in patients with diabetes who have the TAXUS Liberte paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) is similar to that for non-diabetic patients, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Aspirin Guidelines Updated by U.S. Preventive Services

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Before deciding whether to use aspirin to prevent heart attacks or strokes, clinicians should compare risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and smoking against the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Shows Endothelial Benefits After Heart Attack

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Both aerobic and resistance exercises appear effective in improving endothelial dysfunction in individuals after a first recent myocardial infarction, according to research published online March 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Age, Diabetes May Affect Coronary Disease Treatments

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In most patients with multivessel coronary disease who are suitable for either coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), long-term mortality is similar for either treatment. In diabetics and older patients, however, CABG may be associated with a significant survival advantage, according to an article published online March 20 in The Lancet.

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Larval Debridement Therapy Effective for Leg Ulcers

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers, debridement with larval therapy leads to similar outcomes at a similar cost as standard hydrogel therapy, but it may be associated with reduced time to debridement and more pain, according to two studies published March 19 in BMJ Online First.

Abstract - Dumville
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Depression Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which does not appear to be due to inflammation despite previous studies suggesting a link between inflammation and coronary heart disease, according to the results of a study published in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Catheterization, Surgery Compared for Infant Heart Defect

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The transcatheter implantation of the Amplatzer duct occluder in infants to correct the congenital heart defect known as patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is as effective as heart surgery with less risk of infection, a shorter hospital stay and less cost, according to a report in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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NEJM Supports Medical Device Safety Act of 2009

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Passage of the Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 would nullify the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 Riegel v. Medtronic decision -- which shielded medical device manufacturers from the potential consequences of failing to adequately disclose risks -- and significantly improve patient safety, according to an editorial published online March 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Editorial

Heart Failure Before 50 More Common in Blacks Than Whites

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In a cohort of young black and white adults followed for two decades, the likelihood of heart failure before the age of 50 was 20 times higher in blacks than whites, according to research published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Urinary Potassium Associated With Patients' Diet Quality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of urinary potassium may be a simple way to detect a good or poor-quality diet, according to study findings published ahead of print Feb. 11 in the Journal of Nutrition.

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Contrast Agent Additive Offers Cardiorenal Protection

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adding N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to a contrast agent offered protection from contrast-induced nephropathy and protected at-risk myocardium in a study in which ischemia and reperfusion were induced in pigs, according to research reported in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
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Editorial

Body Mass Index Alone Good Predictor of Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) is a strong predictor of mortality risk both above and below the optimal weight range of 22.5-25 kg/m2, according to a report published online March 18 in The Lancet.

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Implantable Defibrillators Less Beneficial in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable defibrillators in older patients with comorbidities or repeated hospitalizations for heart failure may produce only limited protection from sudden death, according to research published in the March 17 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Drug Ineffective in Treating Hereditary High Cholesterol

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pactimibe treatment does not improve atherosclerosis and leads to an increase in the incidence of major cardiovascular events in patients with hereditary high cholesterol compared with placebo, according to a study in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Electrode Placement Affects Heart Failure Monitoring

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring of heart failure patients is more effective if electrodes are placed on the left side rather than the more commonly used right side, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Borderline Arterial Pressure Linked to Mobility Loss

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral arterial disease and even a borderline or low normal ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of relative arterial pressures in the lower and upper extremities, are at higher risk of later mobility loss, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial

Drug Reduces Bleeding in Elderly After Heart Ischemia

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-thrombotic bivalirudin (Angiomax) is effective in improving ischemic outcomes and lowering bleeding complications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), particularly in elderly patients aged 75 years and older who are at higher risk of bleeding, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Survival in Transplant Patients Hinges on Key Risk Factors

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Low-risk combined heart and kidney transplantation recipients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have improved survival after the transplantation when compared with isolated heart transplant recipients, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Aspirin Dose Over 100 mg May Do Heart More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The optimum daily dose of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events is probably between 75 and 81 mg, as a 100-mg dose or more has no obvious benefit and may cause harm in patients who are also taking clopidogrel, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Delays in Seeking Heart Attack Care Vary Worldwide

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Delay seeking medical care for acute myocardial infarction was longest in Argentina and Brazil and shortest in Australia/New Zealand during a six-year study period, according to research published in the March 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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One in Five U.S. Adults Continues to Smoke

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although smoking prevalence is declining nationwide, about one in five U.S. adults still smokes, and only one state has reduced smoking prevalence to the 12 percent or less goal established by Healthy People 2010, according to a report published in the March 13 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Absorbable Everolimus-Eluting Stent Safe and Effective

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A trial of a bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent system shows that it is clinically safe, restores vasomotion and prevents restenosis, researchers report in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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DCMR Stress Testing Predicts Cardiac Events in Women

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Similar to results in men, cardiac abnormalities induced in women after dobutamine cardiac magnetic resonance (DCMR) stress testing are associated with a higher risk of heart attack and cardiac death, according to a study in the March issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
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Drugs Still Best First Step for Non-Acute Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Medical therapy is still the best initial management strategy for non-acute coronary artery disease despite innovations in catheter-based treatment, according to a study published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet, while a second study describes the positive initial findings of a phase II trial of SCH 530348, an oral platelet protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist used in percutaneous coronary intervention.

Abstract - Trikalinos
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Abstract - Becker
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Europe Missing Out on Heart Disease Prevention

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patient surveys conducted in three time periods between 1995 and 2007 show that European countries are missing the opportunity to reduce cardiovascular disease through preventive efforts, according to an article published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Drugs Don't Boost Survival in Older Heart Failure Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People over 80 years of age who have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a prevalent condition in the elderly, do not benefit significantly from commonly prescribed cardiac medications, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Testing Predicts Outcomes in Left Bundle Branch Block

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) are at higher risk of death and major cardiac events if they have abnormal results during exercise echocardiography, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
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Editorial

Too Much Sleep for Older Women Raises Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who report napping daily or sleeping nine or more hours in a 24-hour period are at increased risk of mortality from all causes, with the exception of cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Blood Glucose Affects Survival in Non-Diabetic STEMI Cases

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In non-diabetic patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), high blood glucose at hospital admission is independently associated with an increased risk of short- and mid-term death, according to a report published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Treatment May Reduce Inflammation in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Treating diabetic patients with reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) reduces inflammation, increases cholesterol efflux from macrophages and may be atheroprotective, according to study findings published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Ozone Hikes Risk of Death from Respiratory Causes

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increased concentration of environmental ozone exposure significantly increases the risk of death from respiratory causes, but does not significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular death when particulate matter (PM) concentration is also taken into account, according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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New Diagnostic Test Developed for Cardiomyopathy

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Testing myocardial samples for a reduced level of the desmosomal protein plakoglobin can be an effective diagnostic tool for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Anger, Hostility Linked to Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Anger, hostility and depression are associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease in healthy individuals, according to two studies published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Chida
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Abstract - Whang
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Editorial
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Diabetics Have Different Plaque Qualities

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndrome, those with diabetes have greater inflammatory status and more plaques with signs of vulnerability, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
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Faster Diagnosis Benefits Acute Chest Pain Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In low-risk patients who present to hospitals with acute chest pain, an accelerated diagnostic protocol may be associated with less impairment of quality of life than usual care, according to a report published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Over 6 Million Older Americans May Benefit from Statins

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 6.5 million older American adults have levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) that suggest that they may benefit from statin treatment, according to a report in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Metabolic Disorder, Obesity Associated with Dementia

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity, and its associated metabolic disorders including diabetes, are linked with dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in a series of articles in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract - Fitzpatrick
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Abstract - Yaffe
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Abstract - Helzner
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Abstract - Kanaya
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Editorial

Infective Endocarditis Remains a Lethal Threat

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis continues to be frequently fatal, with acute presentations more common than previously thought and a high rate of Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to study findings published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Children, Teens Most Likely to Survive Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in infants approaches that of adults, is less frequent in children and adolescents, and children and adolescents are twice as likely to survive to discharge, according to research published online Mar. 9 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
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Vascular Risks May Speed Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-existing vascular risk factors such as abnormal cholesterol levels and diabetes may be associated with an accelerated cognitive decline in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Reduced Lung Function

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome is associated with a higher risk of lung function impairment, primarily due to abdominal obesity, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

High-Dose Atorvastatin Reduces Cardiovascular Risks

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In heart attack patients with stable coronary disease, treatment with high-dose atorvastatin may be associated with greater benefits than treatment with standard-dose simvastatin, especially among younger patients, according to the results of a study published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Pulmonary Embolism Common in Acute COPD Patients

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pulmonary embolism may occur in one-quarter of patients hospitalized with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the March issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Depression Symptoms in Stable COPD Linked to Mortality

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Depression symptoms occurring in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with all-cause mortality, according to a report published in the March issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Use of Stroke Prevention Services Can Be Improved

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is widespread underutilization of stroke secondary prevention services, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Exercise in Later Life Reduces Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Men who increase their level of exercise later in life can bring their mortality risk into line with their counterparts who have constantly exercised, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in BMJ.

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Transdermal Patches Pose Burn Risk During Scans

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning about the risk of burns as a result of wearing medicated patches, such as those used for smoking cessation or pain relief, during MRI scans.

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Black Neighborhoods Have Fewer Healthy Food Options

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Areas of Baltimore with a predominantly black or lower-income population have fewer healthy foods available than white and higher-income areas, according to two studies, one published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the other in the March issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract - American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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Abstract - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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Racial Disparities in Heart Failure Treatment Found

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic patients eligible to receive cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are less likely to receive therapy than white patients, and white patients are more likely to receive CRT-D outside of published guidelines, according to a report in the March issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Obama Wants to Spend $630 Billion on Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving health care reform is one of President Barack Obama's major challenges, and his newly released spending plan calls on Congress to commit $630 billion over the next decade to finance that reform, according to an article published online Mar. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Vitamin Pills May Not Help Reach Intake Guidelines

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Taking dietary supplements can help patients reach recommended intake levels for calcium, vitamin C and magnesium, but this is not always the case and many adults are still falling short of the recommended intake, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Teens' Lipid Levels Predict Atherosclerosis in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who have abnormal lipid levels are at higher risk of developing preclinical atherosclerosis as adults, regardless of the lipid cutoffs used by two classification systems, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Arthritis Restricts Exercise in Heart Disease Patients

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease patients who also have arthritis are significantly less likely to engage in physical activity than those without arthritis, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Abnormal Sleep Schedule Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An altered sleep-wake cycle such as that seen during jet lag and shift work can have wide-ranging metabolic and cardiovascular implications, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Proton Pump Inhibitors May Reduce Benefits of Clopidogrel

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Acute coronary syndrome patients who are prescribed clopidogrel in combination with a proton pump inhibitor are at increased risk of adverse outcomes compared with patients prescribed clopidogrel alone, according to a report published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vitamin K Doesn't Reduce Bleeding in Warfarin Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving warfarin, vitamin K does not reduce bleeding, according to study findings published in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Outcomes Reporting May Make Physicians Risk-Averse

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although clinical outcomes report cards perform a valuable public health purpose, the experience of publicly reporting death rates after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in two states suggests that doctors may become risk-averse and avoid high-risk patients, according to a review in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Cardiovascular Risk Biomarkers Cleared By Kidneys

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Two biomarkers that reflect myocardial wall tension and are used to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease are cleared by the kidney, and therefore correct concentrations rely on proper renal function, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Physicians Urged to Implement Nutritional Guidelines

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- To reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, physicians should learn behavior change and motivational interviewing strategies aimed at changing eating habits in children and adults, according to a Scientific Statement published in the Mar. 3 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Racial Disparities Seen in Post-Heart Attack Outcomes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with myocardial infarction, overall outcomes are significantly worse in blacks than in whites. But the differences are attenuated after adjustment for patient characteristics that differ by race such as socioeconomic status and co-morbid conditions, researchers report in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Marathon Runners Have Less Hypertension, Diabetes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Marathon runners have lower prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and hypertension compared to non-marathon runners, according to a report published in the March issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Abstract
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US Motor Vehicle-Related Death Rates Vary Geographically

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although the mortality rate related to motor vehicles remained almost unchanged from 1999 to 2005 in the United States, on closer inspection the data reveals wide variations from state to state, as well as by gender and ethnicity, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Glycemic Control Approaches Lead to Similar Outcomes

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Different approaches to glycemic control in type 2 diabetics following myocardial infarction were associated with similar risk of later cardiovascular events, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Age Stereotypes Affect Disease Risk Later in Life

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who have negative views about aging are more likely to have a cardiovascular event later in life, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Psychological Science.

Abstract
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