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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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March 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: April 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for March 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Safe Practice Scores Do Not Add Up to Fewer Patient Deaths

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitals, higher self-reported scores for improvements in safe practices do not correlate with reduced mortality rates, researchers report in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Little Clinical Evidence to Support Bed Bug Treatments

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) have been associated with dozens of human diseases and their bites are treated with a range of drugs, there is no clinical trial-based evidence for the efficacy of treatments, and there is little evidence that they are communicable disease vectors, according to a review published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Housing for Homeless Alcoholics May Reduce Public Burden

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use and costs for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems are substantially reduced when they are provided housing without the precondition of abstinence from alcohol, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Lower Cancer Risk Seen in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple sclerosis have an overall lower cancer risk, which does not appear to be due to heredity, according to the results of a study published in the March 31 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Late Preterm Birth May Increase Developmental Risks

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm infants have an increased risk of development disability compared with healthy full-term infants and should be monitored for early intervention if problems arise, according to a study in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Early Weight Gain May Predict Childhood Obesity

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of weight gain in the first six months of life can indicate childhood obesity, but one simple and effective intervention may be to encourage children to drink more water, according to two studies published in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Abstract - Taveras
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Abstract - Muckelbauer
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Study Urges More Clinical Research on Gynecologic Testing

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- While professional guidelines call for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in the follow-up of treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there is insufficient clinical research to guide the clinician in the selection of the test to use, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Home Life and Popular Culture Pose Smoking Risk to Children

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking remains a serious health risk for children, who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home and then influenced to take it up themselves by its depiction in popular movies, according to two studies published in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Staff Education Can Help Reduce Elective Labor Inductions

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Staff education and more rigorous enforcement of guidelines for labor induction can reduce the number of unwarranted inductions and lower the cesarean birth rate for first-time births, researchers report in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Sample of Obese Subjects Led Very Sedentary Lives

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In a small sample of morbidly obese individuals, their extremely sedentary lifestyles fell far short of common activity guidelines for cardiovascular protection, according to research published online March 19 in Clinical Cardiology.

Abstract
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Protein Seen to Play Role in Herpes Reactivation

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a virion protein called VP16 appears to be necessary for herpes simplex virus to exit its latent state, according to research published in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

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Obese Women Face High First-Time Pregnancy Risks

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who are pregnant for the first time have an elevated risk of preterm birth, cesarean section delivery and preeclampsia, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Home-Based Training and Therapy Extend Life in Elderly

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Teaching elderly and infirm people how to safely perform daily activities and achieve personal functional goals can markedly extend their lives, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Children's Lung Function Linked to Genetic Variants

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- In children, variants in GST mu genes are associated with decreased lung capacity and small airway flow, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Romantic Love Can Be Intense and Long-Lasting

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to what has been widely believed, long-term relationships don't necessarily kill romantic love, and many couples can maintain an exciting relationship that is positively associated with marital satisfaction, mental health and overall well-being, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Review of General Psychology.

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Early-Pregnancy Smoking Cessation Beneficial

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who stop smoking before 15 weeks' gestation can reduce their risk of spontaneous preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age infants to the same level of pregnant non-smokers, according to research published online March 26 in BMJ.

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NHLBI Discontinues Hypertonic Saline Trial

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S.-Canadian trial to assess in-ambulance administration of a hypertonic saline solution to trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding has been halted due to lack of a survival benefit, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) announced on March 26.

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Low-Income Men May Not Grasp Prostate Cancer Terms

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low literacy levels among medically underserved men highlight the need to consider literacy and use non-medical language for prostate cancer education efforts and outcomes measures, according to a study published online ahead of print March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Drinking Very Hot Tea May Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking tea before it has cooled down slightly is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to study findings published online March 26 in BMJ.

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Aspirin May Protect Against Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People who take aspirin for vascular protection have less incidence of cancer, but only after 10 years of taking the drug, indicating that it may have a protective effect against cancer, according to a review published online March 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Mass Antibiotic Program Can Offer Trachoma Herd Protection

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Herd immunity to trachoma can be achieved through repeated rounds of mass antibiotic administration to children, who are a core means of transmission for the eye disease, according to a report published in the March 28 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial

Most US Adults Should Reduce Sodium Intake

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults are in groups at high risk of hypertension and should reduce their sodium intake to less than a teaspoon of salt a day, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in the March 27 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Weight Gain Between Births Raises Cesarean Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have developed gestational diabetes in a prior pregnancy and have gained more than 10 pounds of weight between pregnancies are at increased risk for cesarean delivery of subsequent babies, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Omega-3s Linked to Prostate Cancer Protection

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intakes of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were associated with a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer, which appeared to be modified by a COX-2 single nucleotide polymorphism, according to research published online March 24 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Family Meals Help Teens Develop Healthy Eating Habits

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Family mealtimes in adolescence are associated with healthful eating habits later in life, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract
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Same-Day IUD Insertion May Promote Contraception

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering women who seek walk-in pregnancy testing or emergency contraception same-day insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) may be an effective strategy for promoting contraception, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Report Calls for Separate US Food Safety Agency

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A dedicated agency for food safety is needed to combat food-related health threats, according to a report, Keeping America's Food Safe, produced by Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Hundred Steps Per Minute May Be Good Fitness Goal

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Taking 3,000 steps in 30 minutes on most days of the week might be a good pace for people to follow to protect their health, according to research published online March 17 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Electric Current Leak Can Trigger Defibrillator Shock

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- An electric current leak that is not noticeable under ordinary circumstances can trigger a serious shock in someone who has an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), according to a letter in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Circumcision Lowers Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a study of Ugandan men, circumcision reduced both the incidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), two co-factors in HIV/AIDs, according to a report in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Cost Barriers Slow Adoption of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Citing cost barriers, relatively few U.S. hospitals have adopted electronic health records, posing a major obstacle for policy makers who say health information technology is critical to the improvement of health care quality and cost-effectiveness, according to an article published online March 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Childhood Soy Intake May Help Prevent Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Asian American women, high soy intake during childhood is associated with a significantly decreased breast cancer risk in adulthood, according to the results of a study published online March 24 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Low Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Show CAD Benefits

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), those with the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and systolic blood pressure had the slowest progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Light Eating During Labor Not Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In selected patients, consumption of a light diet during labor has no effect on obstetric or neonatal outcomes and is not associated with an increased incidence of vomiting, according to research published online March 24 in BMJ.

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Patient Concerns Hamper Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Control

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Many rheumatoid arthritis patients are reluctant to take pain medications and tolerate more pain than necessary as a result, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Elevated Triglycerides Common Among U.S. Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among U.S. adults, hypertriglyceridemia is a common condition associated with physical inactivity, overweight or obesity. But the overwhelming majority of adults with hypertriglyceridemia are not receiving medical treatment for it, according to research published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Americans Fear Chronic Disease Above All Else

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Although Americans fear chronic disease above debt, divorce or unemployment, their lifestyle choices put them at risk for diseases such as diabetes, according to a report released March 24 by the American Diabetes Association.

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Genetic Heart Disease Often Deadly for Children

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic cardiomyopathy that strikes children is associated with serious heart dysfunction and often death, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Collaborative Care Improves Chronic Pain

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who experience chronic pain, those who receive a collaborative approach to pain treatment have improvements in pain and depression severity compared with usual care, researchers report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Burden of Alzheimer's Disease Triples Health Costs

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People aged 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia make Medicare and Medicaid claims that are three times higher than those of their counterparts without the condition, according to a report, 2009 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, released March 24 by the Alzheimer's Association.

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Whole-Body Scans at Trauma Centers Save Lives

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-body computed tomography (CT) should be incorporated into the standard diagnostic process during early resuscitation for patients with blunt trauma injury, according to the results of a study published online March 24 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Pediatric Anesthesia Linked to Learning Disability Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple early exposures to anesthesia may be an important risk factor for developing learning disabilities later in childhood, researchers report in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

Abstract
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Ovarian Cancer Screenings Show Low Positivity Rate

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, regular screening for ovarian cancer has a low positivity rate, suggesting that existing technology is not beneficial in the detection of early cancer, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Vitamin D Insufficiency Increasing in United States

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- About three out of four American adolescents and adults currently have insufficient levels of vitamin D, though oral vitamin D supplementation is effective in preventing fractures among older adults, according to two studies published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Ginde
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Abstract - Bischoff-Ferrari
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Smoking Linked to Risk of Acute, Chronic Pancreatitis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is independently associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis, according to study findings published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Family History Linked to First Venous Thrombosis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of venous thrombosis is independently associated with an up to quadrupled risk of a first venous thrombosis, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Intensive Glucose Control Spikes Mortality in Critically Ill

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intensively controlling blood glucose in a study group of critically ill patients increased their mortality rate and hypoglycemia in comparison to a group receiving conventional glucose control, according to research reported online March 24 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dyspepsia May Improve With Dietary Changes

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with functional dyspepsia may have improved symptoms when they eat smaller meals with lower fat content, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Amniocentesis Linked to Loss in Twin Pregnancies

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women pregnant with twins who undergo amniocentesis may face a higher risk of pregnancy loss, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Shift Away From Sweet Tooth May Signal End to Growth

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Growth markers are lower in adolescents who express a preference for less-sweet drinks, which may indicate that reduced preference for sugar signals an end to growth, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of Physiology & Behavior.

Abstract
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Proteinuria Varies in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease, proteinuria may be associated with disease cause and race, according to study findings published online March 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Reirradiation May Extend Life in Head and Neck Cancers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- For some patients, reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer can extend life. But for those with comorbidities or organ dysfunction, such as feeding tube dependence, it is likely to offer only palliative support, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Socioeconomic Status Impacts Cancer Mortality Rates

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite Sweden's nationwide health care, people with higher socioeconomic status have lower mortality rates for two common hematologic cancers than those with lower socioeconomic status, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Feeling Lonely Affects Health Perception of Older Adults

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- As well as social isolation, feelings of loneliness and lack of social support are associated with a poorer self-perception of health among the elderly, according to a report published in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract
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Continuing to Smoke Worsens Pain in Lung Cancer

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients who continue to smoke even after their diagnosis are more likely to experience moderate to severe pain, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Restenosis Similar With Stent

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Restenosis in patients with diabetes who have the TAXUS Liberte paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) is similar to that for non-diabetic patients, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
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Immune Activation Renders Malaria Mosquitoes Resistant

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Gene silencing activates immune pathways in mosquitoes that carry malaria parasites and renders the mosquitoes resistant to infection, according to a report in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

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Aspirin Guidelines Updated by U.S. Preventive Services

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Before deciding whether to use aspirin to prevent heart attacks or strokes, clinicians should compare risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and smoking against the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Pregnant Women With Bowel Disease Face Higher Risks

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease have an elevated risk of developing adverse pregnancy and maternal outcomes, according to research published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Exercise Shows Endothelial Benefits After Heart Attack

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Both aerobic and resistance exercises appear effective in improving endothelial dysfunction in individuals after a first recent myocardial infarction, according to research published online March 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
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Lifestyle Affects Survival in Head and Neck Cancers

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors, particularly smoking, can have a negative impact on survival for patients with head and neck cancers, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Early Television Exposure Linked to Childhood Asthma

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In early childhood, increased television viewing is associated with a higher risk of developing asthma in later childhood, according to the results of a study published online March 13 in Thorax.

Abstract
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Botulinum Toxin Eases Symptoms of Frey Syndrome

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Frey syndrome, or gustatory sweating, who are given repeated treatments of botulinum toxin type A, experience less severe symptoms and a reduction in the area affected by the condition, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Pressure Ulcer Prevention Important in Surgical Patients

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses should consider every surgical patient "at-risk" for pressure ulcers and devise an individualized plan to mitigate that risk, according to an article in the March issue of the AORN Journal.

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Illegal Immigrants Pose Ethical Dilemma for US Nurses

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though under federal law illegal immigrants in the United States for less than five years are not eligible for Medicaid, emergency department nurses have a range of ethical and legal obligations that require them to protect the safety of all patients regardless of their citizenship status, according to an article published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Depression Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which does not appear to be due to inflammation despite previous studies suggesting a link between inflammation and coronary heart disease, according to the results of a study published in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Patients May Be OK With Watchful Waiting Over Tests

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Watchful waiting as opposed to ordering blood tests for patients with unexplained complaints was not associated with increased patient anxiety or decreased satisfaction, according to research published in the March/April Annals of Family Medicine.

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Endometrial Polyp Diameter Points to Risk of Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women without abnormal bleeding who are incidentally diagnosed with polyps, abnormal histology is only significantly associated with polyps greater than 18 mm in diameter, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Lymphedema Burden High After Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Within two years after breast cancer treatment, a significant number of patients develop lymphedema, resulting in a greater risk of complications and increased treatment costs, according to a study published online March 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Neck Injuries Common in Pediatric Homicide Victims

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who die after abusive head injuries often have neck injuries, although these injuries appear to be only a contributing factor to most brain lesions associated with abusive head trauma, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Catheterization, Surgery Compared for Infant Heart Defect

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The transcatheter implantation of the Amplatzer duct occluder in infants to correct the congenital heart defect known as patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is as effective as heart surgery with less risk of infection, a shorter hospital stay and less cost, according to a report in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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NEJM Supports Medical Device Safety Act of 2009

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Passage of the Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 would nullify the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 Riegel v. Medtronic decision -- which shielded medical device manufacturers from the potential consequences of failing to adequately disclose risks -- and significantly improve patient safety, according to an editorial published online March 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Editorial

Premature Births Costly to American Businesses

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Employer health plans spend more than 10 times as much money to care for babies born prematurely to their employees as they do for healthy, full-term babies, according to a report issued March 17 by the March of Dimes Foundation.

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Seniors' Choice on Medicare Part D Often Not Cost-Based

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors are not motivated simply by cost alone when choosing which Medicare Part D plan to enroll in, according to a report published in March by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Moderate Drinking May Improve Bone Health

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men and postmenopausal women, moderate alcohol consumption may be beneficial to bone health. In men, however, consumption of more than two drinks per day of liquor is associated with significantly lower bone mineral density, according to a study published ahead of print Feb. 25 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
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Editorial

DiGeorge Case Offers Example of Genetic Compensation

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cytogenetic studies of the family of a child with DiGeorge syndrome highlights a case of genetic compensation, according to a report published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Report Describes Immune Response to West Nile

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A scientist who was accidentally infected with West Nile virus in the laboratory has an immune response that could be exploited for therapeutics, according to a case report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Shows Promise in Women

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine against cytomegalovirus (CMV) had a 50 percent efficacy in women of childbearing age, researchers report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Heart Failure Before 50 More Common in Blacks Than Whites

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In a cohort of young black and white adults followed for two decades, the likelihood of heart failure before the age of 50 was 20 times higher in blacks than whites, according to research published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Budesonide Nasal Wash Not Linked to Adrenal Suppression

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of budesonide as a nasal wash in adults with chronic rhinosinusitis appears to relieve symptoms without suppressing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Over-Diagnosis Risk From Prostate Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for prostate cancer does not reduce the mortality rate after seven to 10 years' follow-up, according to study results released online March 18 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, while a second study in the same issue concludes that prostate-specific antigen-based screening does reduce mortality but runs the risk of over-diagnosis.

Abstract: Andriole et al
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Abstract: Schröder et al
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Botulinum Drug for Wrinkles Found Well-Tolerated

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a botulinum toxin type A product (Reloxin) appeared to be well-tolerated and effective after repeated treatments, according to research published in the March/April Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
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Urinary Potassium Associated With Patients' Diet Quality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of urinary potassium may be a simple way to detect a good or poor-quality diet, according to study findings published ahead of print Feb. 11 in the Journal of Nutrition.

Abstract
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Study Finds Imaging Exams of Pregnant Women on the Rise

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging examinations of pregnant women at one Rhode Island medical center increased dramatically over a recent 10-year period, in particular the use of computed tomographic (CT) examinations, according to a report released online March 17 in advance of publication in the May issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Guideline Aids Decision on Surgery for Birth Injury

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed guideline may help determine which infants with obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) would benefit from surgery, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Score Accurately Estimates 10-Year Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A score that uses medical data and does not require laboratory tests accurately estimates 10-year diabetes risk, according to research published March 17 in BMJ Online First.

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Body Mass Index Alone Good Predictor of Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) is a strong predictor of mortality risk both above and below the optimal weight range of 22.5-25 kg/m2, according to a report published online March 18 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Implantable Defibrillators Less Beneficial in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable defibrillators in older patients with comorbidities or repeated hospitalizations for heart failure may produce only limited protection from sudden death, according to research published in the March 17 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Narcolepsy Drug Has Potential for Abuse and Addiction

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Modafinil, a drug used to treat narcolepsy and psychiatric disorders, increases dopamine in the brain and may have the potential for abuse and addiction, according to a report published in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Medical Specialty Status Could Boost Nursing Home Docs

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Granting physicians working in nursing homes the status of medical specialists in their own right would help improve the quality of care for America's 1.6 million nursing home residents, according to an article published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Electrode Placement Affects Heart Failure Monitoring

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring of heart failure patients is more effective if electrodes are placed on the left side rather than the more commonly used right side, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Protein Excess Implicated in Ovarian Cystic Disorder

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Ovaries from women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) produce high levels of nerve growth factor, and mice overproducing nerve growth factor in the ovaries develop cystic ovarian morphology and similar reproductive abnormalities as PCOS patients, according to research published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

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Borderline Arterial Pressure Linked to Mobility Loss

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral arterial disease and even a borderline or low normal ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of relative arterial pressures in the lower and upper extremities, are at higher risk of later mobility loss, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial

Drug Reduces Bleeding in Elderly After Heart Ischemia

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-thrombotic bivalirudin (Angiomax) is effective in improving ischemic outcomes and lowering bleeding complications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), particularly in elderly patients ag

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