Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Caffeine Reduces Leg Pain During Heavy Exercise

Last Updated: April 06, 2009.

 

Effect is seen whether men habitually ingest high or low levels of caffeine

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A moderate dose of caffeine moderately reduces leg muscle pain during high-intensity exercise even in men who habitually drink high levels of caffeine, researchers report in the April issue of the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism.

MONDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- A moderate dose of caffeine moderately reduces leg muscle pain during high-intensity exercise even in men who habitually drink high levels of caffeine, researchers report in the April issue of the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism.

Rachael C. Gliottoni, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues examined quadriceps muscle pain in college-age men who received a moderate dose of caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or placebo, followed by high-intensity cycling (75 to 77 percent of peak oxygen consumption). Of the 25 men, 12 reported low daily caffeine consumption and 13 reported high daily caffeine consumption.

The researchers found that regardless of the level of habitual caffeine consumption, caffeine moderately but significantly reduced the quadriceps muscle pain intensity ratings during 30 minutes of high-intensity exercise.

"The results suggest that caffeine ingestion is associated with a moderate hypoalgesic effect during high-intensity cycling in college-age men who are low or high habitual caffeine consumers, but future work should consider better defining and differentiating pain and effort when examining the effects of caffeine during acute exercise," Gliottoni and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Bracing Routinely Applied After Spinal Procedures Next: Men With Heart Disease Less Likely to Find Full-Time Work

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.