Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Lifestyle Changes Key to Cutting Colorectal Cancer in UK

Last Updated: April 08, 2009.

 

Effects of diet, exercise and less alcohol would be greater than better screening and treatment

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Improved diet, exercise and reduced alcohol consumption could substantially reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer in the United Kingdom by 2024, according to a report released online Feb. 20 in advance of publication in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention.

WEDNESDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Improved diet, exercise and reduced alcohol consumption could substantially reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer in the United Kingdom by 2024, according to a report released online Feb. 20 in advance of publication in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention.

Donald Maxwell Parkin, M.D., of Queen Mary University of London, and colleagues projected colorectal cancer incidence rates for the time period between 1975 and 2004 in the United Kingdom to 2024 using Nordpred package modeling to allow for such factors as cancer screening and exposure to risk factors.

The researchers predict that colorectal cancer incidence in the United Kingdom should decline by about 9 percent by 2024 given current trends. Further declines could be achieved by diet and lifestyle modifications, including less red meat, more fruits and vegetables, regular exercise, reduced alcohol consumption, and weight control. If these changes were widely adopted, the researchers estimate that 31.5 percent of cancers in men and 18.4 percent in women could be prevented. If the weight profile of the U.K. population merely returned to that of 20 years ago, 28 percent of colorectal cancers in men and 14.7 percent in women could be prevented, the report indicates.

"These predictions suggest that realistic lifestyle modifications can result in a substantial reduction in cases of this major cancer. The benefit in terms of avoided deaths is probably greater than that which can be achieved through implementation of the national screening program, and improvements in treatment," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Dynamic Plates Seen As Preferable to Rigid Plates Next: Treatment May Be Helpful at Various Stages of Cirrhosis

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.