Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Even Modest Diet and Exercise Can Improve Teen Health

Last Updated: April 08, 2009.

 

Cutting out the equivalent of a can of soda a day can lead to 'substantial improvements,' study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Even modest improvements in nutrition and exercise can improve physical parameters in overweight teenagers and reduce type 2 diabetes risk, according to a report in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest improvements in nutrition and exercise can improve physical parameters in overweight teenagers and reduce type 2 diabetes risk, according to a report in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Emily Ventura, of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and colleagues studied 54 overweight Latino teenagers, who were randomized into three groups: nutrition classes, nutrition classes plus weight training, and a control group with no intervention. At baseline and 16 weeks, the teenagers were assessed for insulin and glucose, body mass, adipose tissue, and dietary intake.

At endpoint, 55 percent had reduced sugar intake with a mean decrease of 47 g/d and 59 percent had increased fiber intake with a mean increase of 5 g/d, the investigators found. Overall, those who decreased sugar had an improvement in glucose incremental area under the curve (−15 percent versus +3 percent); and insulin incremental area under the curve also improved (−33 percent versus −9 percent). Those who increased fiber intake demonstrated reduced body mass index (−2 percent versus +2 percent) and visceral adipose tissue (−10 percent versus no change), the researchers report.

"Modest changes in sugar and fiber consumption, equivalent to omitting one can of soda or adding one serving of beans daily, could lead to substantial improvements in adiposity and metabolic parameters," the authors conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Two Industrial Chemicals Not Implicated in Risk of Cancers Next: Tax on Sugared Drinks Can Help Tackle Obesity Epidemic

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.