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Work Atmosphere Influences Employees’ Risk of Depression

Last Updated: April 09, 2009.

 

People working in a poor team climate more likely to use antidepressants

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People who work in environments with a poor team climate are more likely to be diagnosed with depression and be prescribed antidepressants compared to their counterparts in a healthier workplace environment, according to study findings published online April 9 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

THURSDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- People who work in environments with a poor team climate are more likely to be diagnosed with depression and be prescribed antidepressants compared to their counterparts in a healthier workplace environment, according to study findings published online April 9 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Marjo Sinokki, of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in Turku, Finland, and colleagues conducted a study of a nationally representative sample of 3,347 employees aged 30 to 64 who provided self-assessed data on the state of their workplace team climate. The researchers diagnosed depression, anxiety and alcohol abuse using a diagnostic interview.

There was a strong association between depressive disorders and working in an environment with a poor team climate, and working in such an atmosphere was a predictor of antidepressant use, the researchers found. However, when the investigators adjusted the model for job control and job demands, they found that the association between anxiety disorders and team climate disappeared.

"As these common mental disorders are a major cause of work disability and account for a considerable proportion of the disease burden, more attention should be paid to psychosocial factors at work," the authors write.

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