Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Dermatology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Gynecology | Infections | AIDS | Internal Medicine | Allergy | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Nephrology | Neurology | Nursing | Oncology | Ophthalmology | Orthopedics | ENT | Pathology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Pulmonology | Radiology | Rheumatology | Surgery | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Financial Rewards for Healthy Behavior Can Be Effective

Last Updated: April 10, 2009.

 

But the practice can be fraught with moral dilemmas

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Although paying people to engage in healthy behaviors or successfully tackle unhealthy ones can be effective, it may carry unintended consequences, according to an editorial published online April 9 in BMJ.

FRIDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although paying people to engage in healthy behaviors or successfully tackle unhealthy ones can be effective, it may carry unintended consequences, according to an editorial published online April 9 in BMJ.

Theresa M. Marteau, Ph.D., of King's College London in the United Kingdom, and colleagues assessed the research to date on the use of financial incentives to encourage clinic visits and drug treatment plan adherence in low- and middle-income countries, as well as part of treatment for alcohol, drug and tobacco addiction, and obesity in developed world settings.

While financial incentives can encourage the desired behavior, there may be unintended consequences such as a shift in the doctor-patient relationship, which is customarily based on trust; downplaying of side effects in order to encourage compliance with drug treatments; and undermining intrinsic motivation to improve health behaviors, the researchers note.

"Even when effective, the use of financial incentives will depend on its acceptability to general populations, health care professionals, and policy makers alike," the authors write. "We need to clarify the frameworks within which to discuss and judge the acceptability of incentive schemes. Ultimately, if personal financial incentives prove to be effective and acceptable in only a few contexts, they may still offer an important means by which to improve population health."

Editorial

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Vaccine Successfully Tested in Latent TB Infection Next: Hepatitis B Infection Often Severe in Hepatitis C Carriers

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.