Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Perioperative Bullying Reduces Nurses’ Effectiveness

Last Updated: April 24, 2009.

 

Workplace empowerment of staff and zero tolerance policy can combat lateral violence

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The perioperative setting is vulnerable to workplace bullying but interventions to eliminate intimidating and unsettling behavior among nursing staff can help eliminate the problem, according to an article published in the April issue of the AORN Journal.

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- The perioperative setting is vulnerable to workplace bullying, but interventions to eliminate intimidating and unsettling behavior among nursing staff can help eliminate the problem, according to an article published in the April issue of the AORN Journal.

Lorraine Bigony, R.N., of Frankford Hospital in Langhorne, Pa., and colleagues write that lateral violence in the perioperative setting includes nonverbal and verbal abuse or innuendo, withholding of information, infighting, sabotaging, scapegoating, invasion of privacy, and betrayal of confidences. Such behavior has been acknowledged as toxic to the nursing workplace, they note.

The perioperative setting is commonly one in which nurses fall prey to bullying by coworkers because it is an inherently stressful environment traditionally isolated from other facilities, with patients requiring acute care and where understaffing often imposes high demands on staff, the authors state.

"Whether perpetrated by physicians, administrators, or colleagues, bullying behaviors have been identified as a routine part of operating room culture," the authors write. "Nursing colleagues must begin to address lateral violence in the perioperative setting. A multidisciplinary buy-in with support from the administration, however, is imperative for success. Continuing education with the aim of increasing awareness, together with a zero tolerance policy, should be the standard for all health care organizations."

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Shoe Insoles Don't Appear to Prevent Back Pain Next: Infection Not Uncommon in Girls Before Sexual Activity

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.