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Category: Rheumatology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2016 Briefing - Rheumatology

Last Updated: December 01, 2016.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Rheumatology for November 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Link Found Between Surgery and Development of Guillain-Barré

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who've recently undergone surgery -- especially those with cancer or autoimmune diseases -- experience slightly higher risks of developing Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) soon afterward, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Neurology: Clinical Practice.

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Rising Rx, ER Prices Pushing U.S. Health Care Spending Up

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Privately insured Americans spent nearly 5 percent more on health care last year than in 2014; this increase was significantly more than that seen in previous years and reflects higher costs for prescription drugs, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations, according to a report published Nov. 22 by the Health Care Cost Institute.

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Barriers Identified in Current Knee Osteoarthritis Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In current knee osteoarthritis care, both personal factors and factors related to health care professionals play a role in treatment nonadherence, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Maternal RA May Be Linked to Childhood Epilepsy in Offspring

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have higher-than-average odds of developing epilepsy, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Neurology.

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HR Capabilities Positively Linked to Quality of Patient Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Human resource (HR) capabilities are positively associated with quality of patient care, with the relationship mediated by proactive work, according to a study published recently in Human Resource Management.

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RA Disease Activity Score Most Influential in Patient Reports

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Higher disease activity score (DAS) is one of the most influential factors for poor patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Meta-Analysis Links Increased BMI, Hand Osteoarthritis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Increased body mass index may have a moderate effect on hand arthritis, according to a meta-analysis published recently in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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AMA Highlights Role of Patient Shame in Opioid Disorders

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Supported by the American Medical Association (AMA), the Providers' Clinical Support System for Opioid Therapies (PCSS-O) has released a collection of resources from a national training and mentoring project developed by physicians to promote the role of self-education and help curb the opioid epidemic.

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Five Strategies Can Reduce Risk of Medical Lawsuits

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Five strategies can be employed by physicians in order to help reduce the risk of lawsuits, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Half of Americans Have at Least One Chronic Health Condition

THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of Americans have at least one chronic disease, mental illness, or problem with drugs or alcohol, according to a study published online recently in Psychology, Health & Medicine.

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