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Category: Rheumatology | Monthly Briefing

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December 2016 Briefing - Rheumatology

Last Updated: January 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Rheumatology for December 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fatigue Levels Vary for Patients With Psoriatic Disease

FRIDAY, Dec. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriatic arthritis have higher levels of fatigue than patients with psoriasis treated with phototherapy or systemic treatment, according to a research letter published online Dec. 22 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Chair Yoga Helps Older Adults Manage Osteoarthritis Pain

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chair yoga may produce sustained improvements in pain interference among older adults with lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA), according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Gastric Bypass Associated With Reduced Risk of Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Gastric bypass, but not gastric banding, is associated with reduced risk of psoriasis, progression to severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in JAMA Surgery.

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Personal Health Care Spending Continues to Soar in the U.S.

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1996 to 2013 there were considerable increases in personal health care spending in the United States, with the highest amounts for diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and low back and neck pain, according to a study published in the Dec. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Health Care Provider Burnout Negatively Affects Quality, Safety

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care provider burnout is negatively associated with quality and safety of health care, according to a meta-analysis published recently in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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DEA Announces Critical Changes in Registration Renewal Process

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced critical changes in its registration renewal process, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Bacterial Cause of Periodontal Disease May Drive RA

THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Specific bacteria may help explain the connection between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in Science Translational Medicine.

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Outcomes-Based Pricing Suggested for New, Costly Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Outcomes-based pricing for novel and expensive biopharmaceuticals is supported in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Dec. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Prevalence of Anti-TSH Receptor Antibody High in Fibromyalgia

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) have high prevalence of anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody (TRAb), according to a study published online Nov. 30 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Prevalence of Disability 2.7 Percent at U.S. Medical Schools

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of disability is 2.7 percent among medical students at U.S. allopathic medical schools, according to a research letter published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue of medical education.

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Learning Interventions Can Improve Med Student Well-Being

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Specific learning interventions may improve emotional well-being among medical students, according to a review published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Depression, Suicide Ideation Prevalent in Medical Students

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalences of depression or depressive symptoms and suicide ideation are 27.2 and 11.1 percent, respectively, among medical students, according to a review published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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DASH Diet Reduces Serum Uric Acid in Prehypertension

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among adults with prehypertension or stage I hypertension, following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet lowers serum uric acid (UA), according to a study published online Nov. 28 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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ABT-494 Effective for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A novel selective JAK-1 inhibitor, ABT-494, is effective for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) or to at least one anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agent, according to two studies published online Nov. 28 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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CDC: Fewer U.S. Families Struggling to Pay Medical Bills

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people in families having problems paying medical bills fell by nearly 13 million from 2011 through the first six months of 2016, according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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