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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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May 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: June 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for May 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stimulant Gum Can Cause Caffeine Overdose

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive consumption of stimulant chewing gum resulted in the hospitalization of a 13-year-old boy due to caffeine overdose, highlighting the hidden risk to children of such easily available products, according to a case report published in the May 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Music May Lessen Pain for Premature Babies

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Playing music in neonatal units may help premature babies to feed better and reduce their pain, according to a review published online on May 28 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal & Neonatal Edition.

Abstract
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Childhood Exposure to Violent Parents Raises Depression Risk

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were exposed to parental violence during childhood are more likely to have mental health problems and become violent spouses and parents themselves, according to a study published online on May 28 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Medical School Faculty, Students Conflict Over Priorities

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Medical school faculty and new physicians who have completed internship training hold differing views about the procedures that are essential to learn during internship, according to a study published in the April issue of Medical Teacher.

Abstract
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Retail Clinics Not Accessible to Underserved Populations

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- So-called retail clinics tend to be located in economically advantaged areas and are not readily accessible to the populations that most need them, according to a study in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 2 (subscription or payment may be required)

Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Set to Double in Europe by 2020

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood type 1 diabetes cases are on the rise in Europe, and are set to double among the under-fives by 2020 compared to 2005, according to a study published online on May 28 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Decision Makers Can't Delay Until H1N1's Scale Is Clear

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Officials must decide what actions to take before the severity and scale of the H1N1 virus are certain, and geography plays an important role in the incidence of the virus, according to perspectives published online May 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Lipsitch
Full Text - Trifonov

Depressed Teens See Barriers to Getting Mental Health Care

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with depression are prone to perceive multiple barriers to getting mental health care, and consequently often do not get any kind of regular treatment, according to a study in the June issue of Medical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Computerized Prescription Order Errors a Risk for Patients

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized provider order entry systems are prone to input errors that may put patients at risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Focus on Meaningful Work Protects Doctors From Burnout

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Academic faculty physicians who focus on what they find most meaningful are less likely to experience burnout, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.K. Initiative Has Unclear Effects on Diabetes Care

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Since the late 1990s, the management of diabetes has improved in the United Kingdom, but it may not be a direct result of the quality and outcomes framework introduced in 2004, according to a study published online May 27 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Abused Teenage Girls at Risk for Internet Victimization

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage girls who have suffered childhood abuse or present themselves provocatively online are at greater risk for sexual solicitation and victimization, according to a study in the June 6 issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Repeat Caesareans Linked to Neonatal Respiratory Problems

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born via elective repeat Caesarean delivery may face a higher risk of certain adverse outcomes, and the rate of delivery hospitalizations involving hypertensive disorders has risen significantly in recent years, according to two studies published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Kamath
Full Text - Kamath
Abstract - Kuklina
Full Text - Kuklina (subscription or payment may be required)

Obese and Diabetic Youth Have Carotid Abnormalities

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Young people who are obese or who have type 2 diabetes mellitus have abnormalities in the carotid artery that should serve as an alert to increased risk of stroke and myocardial infarction in adulthood, according to a study published online on May 26 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Childhood Attention Problems May Affect Academic Results

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have difficulty paying attention at the age of 6 are more likely to have lower attainment scores for math and reading at age 17, according to a study published in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parents Confused About Use of Cold Medication in Infants

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most parents and caregivers of infants under 2 years old would give over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications to their children despite a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) caution to use the products only with children 2 or older, according to a study in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caffeine and Computers Add To Teens' Daytime Sleepiness

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of late-night use of multiple forms of technology and consumption of caffeinated drinks makes many teens unable to stay awake or alert during the day, according to a study published in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Daily Glucose Self-Monitoring May Reduce Macrosomia Risk

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Daily glucose self-monitoring in women with diet-treated gestational diabetes may be associated with a lower risk of delivering an oversized infant than routine weekly monitoring, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study May Explain Fewer Cancers in Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Increased expression of at least one gene on the extra copy of chromosome 21 in patients with Down syndrome reduces angiogenesis and may explain why these patients have a lower incidence of cancer and other diseases, according to a study published online May 20 in Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Telemedicine Benefits Children With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In children with type 1 diabetes, a school-based telemedicine program may lead to better outcomes, according to a study published online May 22 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Democrats Set Ambitious Goal for Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Congressional Democrats face formidable challenges in their efforts to pass health care reform legislation by July 31, but physicians can take the lead to ensure changes are enacted, according to two perspectives published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Iglehart
Full Text - Fisher

Sticking to Work Hours Limits Very Costly

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits on work hours, and other measures aimed at reducing fatigue among residents, would be costly with no proven benefits, according to an article published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Swine Flu Has Higher Fatality Rate Than Seasonal Flu

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The fatality rate from H1N1 swine flu is slightly higher than the fatality rate from seasonal flu, according to United States' health officials, but they say most cases of swine flu are no worse than seasonal flu.

More Information

Training in Supportive Care Improves Nurses' Performance

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are trained in developmentally supportive care are better able to take care of premature babies than those who do not receive such training, according to a study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family Activities Linked to Teens' Sexual Behaviors

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Participating in more family activities may be associated with fewer risky sexual behaviors in teenagers, according to research published May 15 in Child Development.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adolescent Testosterone Enhances Adult Mating

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated testosterone before and during adolescence enhances male mating behavior in adulthood, while increased testosterone before adolescence affects the size of various brain areas associated with mating behavior in juveniles, according to a study published online May 7 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Climate Change Cited as World's Biggest Health Threat

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- During the 21st century, climate change will present the world's most important health challenge, according to a report published in the May 16 issue of The Lancet.

Article
Podcast
Editorial
Comment

Swine Flu Spread Comparable to Pandemic Flu

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The current swine flu outbreak originating in Mexico appears to spread substantially faster than seasonal flu and is comparable to the low end of pandemic flu outbreaks, although the virus appears to be less severe than the 1918 pandemic flu, according to a study published online May 11 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text

Combined Treatment May Offer Bronchiolitis Benefit

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nebulized epinephrine and oral dexamethasone in infants presenting to emergency departments with bronchiolitis might reduce later hospital admission, according to research published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Folate Fortification Law Linked to Decreased Heart Defects

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- After a Canadian law mandating the fortification of flour and pasta products with folate went into effect in 1998, the birth prevalence of severe congenital defects has decreased in Quebec, according to a study published online May 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Post-Mortem Organ Donation Procedures Vary

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- While most children's hospitals have policies for post-mortem organ donation, they vary on key points, such as the processes for pronouncing death and withdrawing life support, according to a study reported in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Drug Promotional Items Affect Medical Students' Preference

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students who are exposed to small branded promotional items from pharmaceutical companies may be more likely to hold favorable views of the advertised drug. However, the opposite effect may occur among students who attend schools with restrictive policies toward pharmaceutical marketing, according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Number of Swine Flu Cases in U.S. Exceeds 2,500

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has surpassed Mexico to become the nation with the most confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu, according to figures released May 11 by the World Health Organization (WHO).

More information

Childhood Body Mass Index Screening Needs Improvement

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Before a statewide childhood body mass index (BMI) screening system can be put in place in Florida, screening activities need to be improved at a local level, according to a report in the May 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Low Intake of Vitamins A and C May Increase Risk of Asthma

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low dietary intake of vitamins A and C is associated with higher odds of asthma, according to a study published online on April 30 in Thorax which contradicts the findings of a large study published last year.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene Variants Linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Variants of neuronal cell-adhesion molecules are associated with autism spectrum disorders, according to two studies published online April 28 in Nature.

Abstract - Wang
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Abstract - Glessner
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Increased Vaccination Refusal Heightens Public Health Risks

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The number of parents refusing vaccination for their children is on the increase, challenging pediatricians to be effective vaccination advocates while respecting the decisions of those who opt to forego them, according to an article in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Single Gene Mutation Can Cause Diverse Conditions

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Separate mutations inhibiting the delivery of calcium or potassium to cells at different body sites resulted in a cascade of rare medical conditions in families, according to two case reports published in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Picard
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Abstract - Brockenhauer
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Stay Home With H1N1, but Don't Race to Shut Schools

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- School students, faculty and staff infected by the H1N1 virus should stay home, but communities need not close schools entirely, according to revised school closure guidelines issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.

What to Do If You Get Flu-Like Symptoms
Taking Care of a Sick Person in Your Home

Immunity Not Always Predicted by Vaccination Records

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination records for international adoptees do not necessarily predict protective immunity, according to a study in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. In a related study, timely vaccination coverage among low-income children in the United States has largely increased in the last decade.

Abstract - Verla-Tebit
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Abstract - Smith
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Bullying May Raise Risk of Children's Psychotic Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Victims of childhood bullying may face a higher risk of displaying psychotic symptoms in early adolescence, according to research published in the May Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vaccine Order Affects Pain in Immunized Infants

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Infants receiving the less painful vaccine against five pathogens followed by the more painful pneumococcal vaccine experience less pain overall than if the vaccinations are given in the reverse order, according to a study in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Little Evidence to Support Some H1N1 Flu Measures

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Some of the interventions that have been introduced in the wake of the outbreak of H1N1 flu have little or no evidence to support them, according to an editorial published online May 5 in The Lancet, while a report in the same journal asks whether or not the international response to the outbreak was fast enough.

Full Text
Comment
Editorial

Physical Therapists Can Successfully Treat Clubfoot

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Physical therapists can use the Ponseti method to treat clubfoot as effectively as surgeons and their patients have fewer recurrences, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Minimum Interval Vaccination Schedule Effective in Arizona

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Positive results were seen with minimum interval vaccine scheduling during an outbreak of pertussis in Arizona, while recall systems appear to benefit influenza vaccination rates among high-risk children despite vaccine shortage in Colorado. These two studies are published in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Bronson-Lowe
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Abstract - Allison
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Medical Center Press Releases Often Lacking Key Details

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Press releases from academic medical centers may often overstate the importance of research findings while failing to acknowledge relevant limitations of the studies, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Social Marketing May Improve Vaccination Rates

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Social marketing designed to appeal to emotion may be an effective strategy to encourage parents hesitant about immunization to immunize their children, according to a study in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. In a related study, giving the first dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine earlier may reduce invasive pneumococcal disease.

Abstract - Opel
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Abstract - Stancil
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Amygdala Enlargement Seen in Young Children With Autism

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- At the age of 2 years, the amygdala was enlarged in children with autism compared to controls, a finding that was associated with joint attention, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence Supports Folic Acid for Neural Tube Protection

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence continues to support the use of folic acid supplementation for preventing neural tube defects, according to research published in the May 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text - Study
Full Text - Recommendation Summary

Fathers' Mental Health Effect on Child Development Studied

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatric disorders among fathers deserve more attention from clinicians and researchers because they have a significant impact on children's psychosocial development, according to a study published online May 5 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Falling Furniture Is an Increasing Hazard for Children

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Because tipped-over furniture accounts for an increasing number of injuries among children, pediatricians and caregivers need to be aware of such hazards and acquaint themselves with prevention strategies, according to a study published online May 3 in Clinical Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Number of US Swine Flu Cases Climbs to 286 in 36 states

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The confirmed number of swine flu cases in the United States swelled to 245 in 35 states by May 3, but federal health officials are expressing cautious optimism that the disease may be leveling off and may not be as dangerous as initially feared. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated the number of confirmed national cases to 286 in 36 states as of late this morning.

More Information

Folate Levels Linked to Markers of Asthma

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- High blood folate levels are associated with lower levels of markers of allergy, according to a study published online May 1 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Flu Poses Major Surveillance Challenge

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Containment of the influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, outbreak is probably impossible because cases are already geographically widespread and countries with fragile health systems lack the ability to properly conduct surveillance and containment activities, according to an editorial published online April 30 in BMJ.

Editorial

CDC: More Than 100 H1N1 Flu Infections in US

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- As of Thursday, April 30, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 109 cases of influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, in the United States, with 50 cases in New York, 26 in Texas, 14 in California, 10 in South Carolina, and the rest in seven other states. So far, only one death has been recorded.

More Information

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