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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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June 2009 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: July 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for June 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Dads' Depression Linked to Later Infant Crying

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of depression in soon-to-be fathers during pregnancy may be a risk factor for excessive infant crying, according to research published in the July issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Depression Linked to Poor Outcomes in Heart Patients

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In heart patients, depression is significantly associated with an increased risk of angina and cardiovascular mortality, according to two studies published online June 29 in Circulation.

Abstract - Arnold
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Abstract - Frasure-Smith
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Oncology Best Supportive Care Studies Faulted

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In oncology, best supportive care studies exhibit ethical and methodological shortcomings, and systematic bias or error that may be due to ad hoc supportive care and lack of standardized delivery, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Adolescents' Lifespan Belief Linked to Health Outcomes

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- A perceived risk of early death appears to have a reciprocal relationship with health outcomes and risk behaviors in adolescents, according to research published in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Study Highlights Autism's Genetic Complexity

MONDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- A study comparing genetic samples of autistic and normal children has identified 27 different genetic regions where missing or extra copies of DNA segments may interfere with gene function and impair neurological development, according to a study in the June 26 issue of PloS Genetics.

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Melatonin Fails to Relieve Surgery Anxiety in Children

MONDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Despite positive results treating preoperative anxiety in adults, oral melatonin is not effective in reducing preoperative anxiety in children, according to a study in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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Genes That May Play a Role in Etiology of ADHD Identified

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Genes that previously have been associated with autism, schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders may play a role in causing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the most common neuropsychiatric childhood disorder, according a study published online June 23 in Molecular Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Super Bowl Outcome May Affect Cardio Death Rates

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- The National Football League's annual Super Bowl and its outcome may have an impact on the death rate of a city whose team competed in the game, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Alcohol Causes Most Deaths in Russian Adults Under 55

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- In many years, alcohol causes more than half of all deaths in the 15 to 54 years age group in Russia, and together with smoking accounts for the large discrepancy in adult mortality between western European countries and Russia, according to a study in the June 27 The Lancet, which has a special focus on alcohol.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression May Reactivate Inflammatory Bowel Disease

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with quiescent inflammatory bowel disease, depression may reactivate inflammation, according to an animal study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Anxious Heart Attack Patients Struggle to Change Habits

THURSDAY June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Myocardial infarction patients are less likely to adhere to risk-reducing recommendations if they suffer from anxiety, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Americans Paying for More of Their Health Care Costs

WEDNESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Out-of-pocket costs are rising for Americans with health care coverage, including premiums, deductibles and copayments, according to a new June 23 report from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

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President Signs Tobacco Law, Acts on Medicare Coverage

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama moved on two health care fronts today, signing new legislation to regulate tobacco industry marketing and announcing an agreement with the nation's pharmaceutical companies to reduce the cost of prescription drugs for Americans on Medicare who find themselves in the so-called "doughnut hole" coverage gap.

Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act
Pharmaceutical Discounts for Seniors

Body Responds to Changes in Musical Rhythms

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of individual musical preference, changes in musical tempo cause autonomic respiratory and cardiovascular responses, according to a study published on June 22 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Motor Function Declines Faster in Less Socially Active Elders

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who do not participate frequently in social activities are likely to experience a more rapid decline in motor function than their more socially active counterparts, according to a study published in the June 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Schizophrenia Linked to Increased Cancer Mortality

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with schizophrenia, women have an increased risk of death from breast cancer and men have an increased risk of death from lung cancer, according to a study published online June 22 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Reinforced Infection Control Needed to Combat H1N1

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infection control messages aimed at health care workers should be reinforced in an effort to reduce the spread of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus, according to a study published in the June 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Racial Differences Evident in Alcohol-Related Suicides

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- There are significant racial and ethnic variations in the burden of alcohol-attributable suicides in the United States, according to a study published in the June 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Co-Proxamol Withdrawal Results in Fewer Suicides

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- There was a significant reduction in the number of accidental poisonings and suicides when the drug co-proxamol was withdrawn in 2005, and there has been no subsequent increase in the number of deaths involving other painkillers, according to a study published online on June 18 in BMJ.

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Purpose in Life Affects Mortality Rates in Older Adults

THURSDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who score highly on purpose-in-life scales have lower risk of mortality than their counterparts with low scores, according to a study published in the June issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
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Individual Mandate for Health Insurance Affordable and Fair

WEDNESDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Reforming the health insurance market so that all individuals are required to obtain at least a minimum amount of health insurance would eliminate the problem of adverse selection that the current system enables insurers to avoid, according to a perspective published online June 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Serotonin Transporter Gene Not Linked to Depression

TUESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is no connection between the serotonin transporter gene variation 5-HTTLPR, stressful life events, and an increased risk of major depression, according to a study published in the June 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Mouse Model Sheds Light on ARX, Infantile Spasms

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse model of pediatric epilepsy with features of infantile spasms, along with new findings in families with gene mutations linked to infantile spasms, could change the counseling given to families of children with such mutations, according to research published in the June issue of Brain.

Abstract
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Depression Linked to Increased Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- For people with mild cognitive impairment, depression is associated with high risk for development of Alzheimer's disease, but the association can be mitigated with the Alzheimer's disease drug donepezil, according to a study in the June 16 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Stimulants Linked to Sudden Unexplained Death in Youths

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Stimulant drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) have been associated with a more than seven-fold higher risk of sudden death, according to a study published online June 15 in the American Journal of Psychiatry. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not concluded that these data affect the overall risks and benefits, and research is ongoing.

Abstract
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Editorial
More Information - FDA

Sweeping Medical Reforms Lack Medical Liability Element

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Three approaches to medical reform currently under discussion in the United States all have pros and cons, and questions remain over whether or not the reform package should include changes to the medical liability system, according to an article published online June 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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SSRI Link to Bleeding After Heart Surgery Analyzed

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants pose no greater bleeding risk after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) than non-SSRI antidepressants, according to a study in the May 15 American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Behavioral Intervention May Help Overactive Bladder

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Tolterodine extended release, along with a behavioral intervention, may lead to treatment satisfaction in patients with overactive bladder who were previously dissatisfied with antimuscarinics, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Many Emergency Nurses Suffer From Compassion Fatigue

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The high prevalence of symptoms of secondary traumatic stress among emergency room nurses indicates that many may be at risk of emotional exhaustion and separation from patients, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
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Bill Giving FDA Authority Over Tobacco on Way to President

FRIDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- Legislation giving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory control over tobacco products is headed to the White House for President Obama's signature, as health organizations continue to applaud the action.

AMA Press Release
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China's Profile of Mental Illness Poorly Researched

FRIDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- The estimates of prevalence, disability and treatment rates used in the national analysis of the mental illness disease burden in China do not match the reality of the situation at provincial level, according to a study published in the June 13 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Senate Approves Bill Giving FDA Authority Over Tobacco

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Senate has passed a measure that would give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) broad authority over the advertising, sale, and manufacture of tobacco products, an action that is being applauded by the American Medical Association, among others.

AMA Press Release
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Dry Eye Affects 1.68 Million Older Men in U.S.

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Dry eye disease affects 1.68 million U.S. men age 50 and older, and those who have high blood pressure, an enlarged prostate, or use antidepressants are at elevated risk, according to a study reported in the June Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Effects of Depression on Families Need to Be Addressed

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Treating depression should incorporate strategies to detect and prevent the impact of the disease on patients' children, according to a June 10 report by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine.

More Information

Discrimination Perceived in Huntington's Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- People at risk for having the Huntington's disease mutation frequently experience discrimination when buying insurance and in family, social and other situations, according to a study published June 9 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Childhood Eye Condition Linked to Psychiatric Disorders

WEDNESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Children with the eye condition intermittent exotropia (IXT) have a nearly three-fold increase in risk for a mental health disorder in adulthood, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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New Cognitive Test Accurately Detects Alzheimer's Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- A new self-administered and concise cognitive test developed at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., can detect Alzheimer's disease with 93 percent sensitivity, according to a study published online June 9 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Education, Fitness Associated With Successful Aging

TUESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- The profile of older adults who maintain cognitive function is unique and different from those who undergo cognitive decline, according to a study published in the June 9 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Prognostic Testing Often Desired in Choroidal Melanoma

MONDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with choroidal melanoma may be likely to want to know the results of prognostic testing, but also desire accompanying counseling, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Genetic Counseling.

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Sedatives, Hypnotics Linked to Suicide Risk in Elderly

MONDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals taking sedative or hypnotic drugs may have a higher risk of suicide, according to research published June 4 in BMC Geriatrics.

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Researchers Identify Novel Autism Candidate Gene

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- The calcium channel subunit gene, CACNA1G, may be a novel candidate gene for autism spectrum disorder, according to a study published online May 19 in Molecular Psychiatry.

Abstract
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148,000 U.S. Children Have Tourette Syndrome

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 148,000 U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 17 have Tourette syndrome, a prevalence of 3.0 in 1,000, according to a report in the June 5 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Tai Chi May Be Modestly Effective for Arthritis Patients

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with arthritis, Tai Chi appears to be modestly effective at reducing pain and tension and improving disability, physical performance, and quality of life; but in people with other types of musculoskeletal pain, its effects are unclear, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research).

Abstract
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Frequent Moving Linked to Suicide Risk in Adolescence

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Changing residences frequently is associated with risk of suicidal behavior in adolescents, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Many U.K. Trained Doctors Stay in National Health Service

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of domestic medical students in Britain work in the National Health Service (NHS) after graduation, as do the majority of doctors from overseas who go to the country for training, with men and women choosing similar career paths, according to a study published online June 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Family Therapy Can Help Children of Anxious Parents

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Family-based cognitive behavioral therapy can help prevent children of parents with anxiety disorders from developing anxiety disorders themselves, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Abstract
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Citalopram Found Ineffective Treating Autistic Children

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant citalopram hydrobromide was no better than placebo in the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorders, according to a report in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Behavioral Program Can Help Prevent Teen Depression

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- A cognitive behavioral prevention program can help prevent depression in teenagers who have a family history of the condition, according to a report in the June 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Survey Spurs Female Dialogue With Doctors on Violence

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- A computer-based screening survey can help facilitate discussion between women and their physicians and detect incidents of intimate partner violence and control (IPVC), according to a study published online June 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Depression Diagnoses Drop After 2003 Suicide Warning

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- In the wake of a 2003 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warning about potential suicide among pediatric patients on antidepressants, the projected rate of depression diagnosis dropped sharply, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Major, Minor Depression Frequent in Pregnancy

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Major and minor depression are relatively common in pregnant women, each with different risk factors, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Perceptions of Junk Food TV Ads Aimed at Kids Challenged

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Television advertisements of particular appeal to children are no more likely to be promoting unhealthy foods than those that don't appeal to children, according to a study published online May 28 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Abstract
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