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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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June 2009 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: July 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for June 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Protein Growth Factor Used in a Quarter of Spinal Fusions

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- A sharp increase in the use of bone-morphogenetic protein (BMP) growth factor in spinal fusion since 2002 is associated with an increase in the complication rate for anterior cervical fusion and increased hospitalization charges, according to a study in the July 1 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Oncology Best Supportive Care Studies Faulted

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In oncology, best supportive care studies exhibit ethical and methodological shortcomings, and systematic bias or error that may be due to ad hoc supportive care and lack of standardized delivery, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Survival Good in Transplant for Congenital Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In heart transplant patients, those who are transplanted for congenital heart disease and survive the early postoperative period are usually as likely as other patients to experience late survival, according to a study published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Intense Surveillance Beneficial in Early-Stage Colon Cancer

TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stage I and IIA colon cancer, intensive postoperative surveillance is as beneficial as it is in late-stage patients, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Melatonin Fails to Relieve Surgery Anxiety in Children

MONDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Despite positive results treating preoperative anxiety in adults, oral melatonin is not effective in reducing preoperative anxiety in children, according to a study in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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CT-Myelogram Still Useful in Diagnosing Spinal Disorders

MONDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although MRI has become the standard tool for assessing patients with degenerative cervical spinal disorders, postmyelographic computed tomography (CTM) can still provide useful diagnostic information, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
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Genomic Copy Number Affects Anesthetic Response

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- In the fruit fly Drosophila, variation in gene copy number has a significant effect on sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, a finding that may have important implications for human patients, according to a study published in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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Seattle Protocol No Better Than Less Intensive Method

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- In Barrett's esophagus patients with high-grade dysplasia, the intense Seattle biopsy protocol is no more reliable than a less intensive surveillance protocol at predicting early cancers at the time of esophagectomy, according to a study in the June Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Hispanics May Get Lower Quality Bypass Surgeons

FRIDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Massachusetts are more likely than either Caucasian or African-American patients to have a lower quality surgeon, according to a study in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Coronary Intervention Safe Without Surgery Team on Site

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- National data on percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) show they are as safe at medical centers without on-site surgical backup as at centers with on-site backup, according to a report in the June 30 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Ablative Therapy Cost Effective in Barrett's Esophagus

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Barrett's esophagus, endoscopic ablation is a cost-effective strategy for managing those with high-grade dysplasia, and may also be cost effective for those with low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia, according to a study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Licorice Gargle Can Cut Postoperative Sore Throat

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A licorice gargle just before induction of anesthesia may reduce sore throat after surgery, according to research published in the July issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Spinal Cord Stimulation Viable in Deployed Military Personnel

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be a viable approach to treating military personnel with chronic pain who wish to continue overseas deployments, according to research published in the July issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Treating More Patients Cuts Heart Disease Deaths

THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing the number of coronary heart disease patients treated to 60 percent could save 135,000 additional lives, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Urine Biomarkers Discovered for Acute Appendicitis

WEDNESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of certain protein biomarkers in the urine may be useful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, which can present with varied symptoms, according to a study reported online June 24 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Americans Paying for More of Their Health Care Costs

WEDNESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Out-of-pocket costs are rising for Americans with health care coverage, including premiums, deductibles and copayments, according to a new June 23 report from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

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Bariatric Surgery Trims Cancer Incidence in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss resulting from bariatric surgery can cut cancer incidence in obese women, but has no significant effect in obese men, according to a study published online June 24 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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First-Degree Atrioventricular Block Shows Heightened Risk

TUESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with first-degree atrioventricular block may have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, pacemaker implantation, and all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the June 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Vaginal Brachytherapy After Surgery May Offer Benefits

TUESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal brachytherapy may provide improved quality-of-life benefits compared with external-beam radiotherapy following endometrial carcinoma surgery, according to research published online June 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Total Knee Arthroplasty Found Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among Medicare patients, total knee arthroplasty is cost-effective, especially when performed at high-volume hospitals, according to a study published in the June 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Invited Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

President Signs Tobacco Law, Acts on Medicare Coverage

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama moved on two health care fronts today, signing new legislation to regulate tobacco industry marketing and announcing an agreement with the nation's pharmaceutical companies to reduce the cost of prescription drugs for Americans on Medicare who find themselves in the so-called "doughnut hole" coverage gap.

Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act
Pharmaceutical Discounts for Seniors

Platelet Glue May Not Improve Spinal Fusion Rates

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Using platelet glue, which comprises platelet gel and fibrin glue, does not improve the outcome of instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Spine Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
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Violet Light Treatment May Be Useful Against H. pylori

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The use of intra-gastric violet light phototherapy could be helpful in eradicating Helicobacter pylori in infected individuals, according to research published in the July issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
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Reinforced Infection Control Needed to Combat H1N1

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infection control messages aimed at health care workers should be reinforced in an effort to reduce the spread of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus, according to a study published in the June 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Scoliosis Surgeries May Compromise Pulmonary Function

MONDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, surgical approaches that violate the chest wall are associated with a significant but temporary decline in pulmonary function, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
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Office Urologic Procedures Pose Little Risk

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cystoscopy and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy performed in the office setting appear to pose minimal risk to patients, according to research published in the June issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Bone Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis Connection Complex

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis, hip bone mineral density appears to be associated with focal erosions, but the relationship is not significant after controlling for other variables. However, the relationship appears to be stronger in certain subgroups of patients, according to a study published in the June issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Tea Polyphenols May Inhibit Prostate Cancer Progression

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Taking daily doses of green tea polyphenols in capsule form may someday have a role in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer, according to a study published online June 19 in Cancer Prevention Research.

Abstract
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Many Stone Patients May Not See Urologist After ER

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients visiting an emergency department with ureterolithiasis may not follow up with a urologist, according to research published in the June issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Half of Seniors on Kidney Transplant List May Die

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of the patients older than 60 waiting for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor will die while on the waiting list, according to a study published online June 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Advances Seen in Biologic Therapies for Disk Disease

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Biologic therapies show great potential for treating patients with degenerative disk disease, but more research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy before they can be widely used, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
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Billing Claims Markers of Cardiovascular Events

FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients who undergo kidney transplantation, use of combined Medicare Parts A and B billing claims is a sensitive measure of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online June 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Macrophage Marker Linked to Survival in Melanoma

THURSDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of a protein shed from anti-inflammatory macrophages and the level of macrophage infiltration into the tumor are associated with survival in patients with melanoma, according to a study published online June 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Purpose in Life Affects Mortality Rates in Older Adults

THURSDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who score highly on purpose-in-life scales have lower risk of mortality than their counterparts with low scores, according to a study published in the June issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
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Glove Perforation Raises Odds of Surgical Site Infection

THURSDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical glove perforation significantly increases the risk of surgical site infection in procedures where surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis is not applied, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Individual Mandate for Health Insurance Affordable and Fair

WEDNESDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Reforming the health insurance market so that all individuals are required to obtain at least a minimum amount of health insurance would eliminate the problem of adverse selection that the current system enables insurers to avoid, according to a perspective published online June 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Spinal Approaches Linked to Similar Pain Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures, conservative treatment may be associated with similar improvements in pain as percutaneous vertebroplasty, according to research published in the June 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Top Trauma Centers Still Have Preventable Complications

WEDNESDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mature trauma centers have a low rate of preventable or potentially preventable complications, but there is still room for improvement in certain key areas of patient care, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Polymyxin B Hemoperfusion Beneficial in Sepsis

TUESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, an antibiotic-based "hemoperfusion" device to remove toxic products of bacteria from the blood, in addition to conventional treatment may reduce the risk of death, according to a study published in the June 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Clustering Linked With Access to Colon Cancer Care

TUESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- The more African Americans a county has, the less colorectal surgeons, gastroenterologists and radiation oncologists there are in that county, whereas an increasing percentage of Asian Americans is associated with more specialists in that area, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Stenting of Occluded Renal Artery Not Recommended

TUESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Stenting and medical treatment in the treatment of renal artery stenosis showed no benefit over medical treatment alone in a study reported in the June 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Bariatric Surgery May Lead to Back Pain Improvements

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The substantial weight loss resulting from bariatric surgery may be associated with moderate improvements in pre-existing low back pain in the following year, according to research published in the June issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Discoblock Effective for Back Pain Diagnosis

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Pain relief after an injection of bupivacaine rather than pain provocation after injection of contrast medium into the painful disc is a useful tool to diagnose discogenic lower back pain, and patients have better outcomes after spinal surgery, according to a study in the June 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Sweeping Medical Reforms Lack Medical Liability Element

MONDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Three approaches to medical reform currently under discussion in the United States all have pros and cons, and questions remain over whether or not the reform package should include changes to the medical liability system, according to an article published online June 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bill Giving FDA Authority Over Tobacco on Way to President

FRIDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- Legislation giving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory control over tobacco products is headed to the White House for President Obama's signature, as health organizations continue to applaud the action.

AMA Press Release
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NHS and Midwife Births Have Their Share of Problems

FRIDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- The outcomes of births in Great Britain's National Health Service (NHS) and those managed by an independent midwife point to a need for a review of both practices, according to a study published online June 11 in BMJ.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Senate Approves Bill Giving FDA Authority Over Tobacco

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Senate has passed a measure that would give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) broad authority over the advertising, sale, and manufacture of tobacco products, an action that is being applauded by the American Medical Association, among others.

AMA Press Release
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Anesthesia Technique Shows Benefits in Carotid Surgery

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- An anesthesia approach called cooperative patient general anesthesia allows neurological monitoring plus safe airway control during carotid endarterectomy, according to research published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Ginkgo Extract May Be Beneficial for Neuropathic Pain

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- A Ginkgo biloba extract appeared to reduce pain sensitivity in rats with neuropathic pain, according to research published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Colorectal Cancer Rates Increasing in Younger Adults

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Though overall rates of colorectal cancer have been declining in the United States, incidence rates in adults under 50 years of age have been increasing since the early 1990s, according to research published in the June issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Higher Donor Risk Index Linked to Liver Graft Failure

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The donor risk index appears to have a particularly adverse effect on outcomes in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), but liver grafts with steatosis don't seem to worsen three-year survival in patients with this infection, according to the results of two studies published in the June issue of Liver Transplantation.

Abstract - Maluf
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Abstract - Burra
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Prostate Cancer Treatment Side Effects Explored

THURSDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The treatments for localized prostate cancer -- prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external radiation -- have varied side effect profiles, and these should be taken into consideration in the selection of a treatment, according to a study published online June 9 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Androgen Deprivation Linked to Diabetes in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with a higher risk of diabetes and fragility fractures in men with prostate cancer, according to a study published online June 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) dynamics do not add predictive value for prostate cancer outcomes.

Abstract - Alibhai
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Editorial
Abstract - O'Brien
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Editorial

Surgery Improves Spondylolisthesis Outcomes

MONDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and associated spinal stenosis, those who are treated surgically have significantly better outcomes after four years than those who are treated nonoperatively, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Medications Reduce Postmenopausal Fracture Risk

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, teriparatide and raloxifene may significantly reduce the risk of vertebral fractures, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Many at High Risk for Stroke Don't Get Timely Surgery

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients in the United Kingdom at high risk for stroke do not receive carotid endarterectomy within the recommended two weeks from onset of symptoms, according to a study published online on June 5 in BMJ, while a related analysis says the U.K. government's emphasis on acute stroke may come at the expense of resources and attention for other elements of stroke care.

Abstract
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Analysis

Illness, Medical Bills Linked to Growing Bankruptcy Numbers

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Medical problems appear to be contributing to a growing number of bankruptcies in the United States, according to research published online June 5 in the American Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Location of Pain May Affect Spinal Surgery Outcome

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing decompression surgery to treat spinal stenosis are likely to have a worse outcome if their preoperative pain in the back is bad relative to pain in the legs or buttocks, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Active Patients Get Better Outcome From Fusion

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Isthmic spondylolisthesis patients who undergo fusion have a better outcome if they are working prior to surgery, and male gender and regular exercise also contribute to a more favorable outcome, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Human-Rights Treaties Do Not Improve Health Outcomes

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- A country's ratification of a United Nations' human-rights treaty does not necessarily mean improved health for its citizens, according to an article published in the June 6 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Pre-Op Briefing May Cut Down on Surgery Disruptions

THURSDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- A preprocedural briefing -- found commonly in other high-consequence scenarios -- may decrease surgical flow disruptions during cardiac surgery cases, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Abstract
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Many U.K. Trained Doctors Stay in National Health Service

WEDNESDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of domestic medical students in Britain work in the National Health Service (NHS) after graduation, as do the majority of doctors from overseas who go to the country for training, with men and women choosing similar career paths, according to a study published online June 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Many Children Lack Quick Access to Trauma Center

TUESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of children in the United States, particularly those in sparsely populated areas, lack prompt access to pediatric trauma centers (PTCs), according to research published in the June Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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New Surgical Technique for Cervical Cancer Effective

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new surgical technique that removes the Fallopian tubes, uterus, and parts of the vagina is effective in preventing recurrences in women with cervical cancer compared with radical hysterectomy, according to a study published online June 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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