Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

July 2009 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves New Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved saxagliptin (Onglyza) to treat type 2 diabetes in adults, according to a release issued July 31.

More Information

Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Maro
Full Text
Abstract - Pace
Full Text

Kt/V Use in Predicting Mortality Affected by Model

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- In dialysis patients, Kt/V significantly predicts mortality when accelerated failure time models are used, but not proportional hazard models, according to research published online July 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Factors Linked to Hyperglycemia Care Identified

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients are more likely to experience sustained hyperglycemia if they are older and African-American, and are more likely to experience delays in receiving appropriate treatment if they have lower incomes, lower medication adherence, fewer physician visits and higher drug copayments, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract

Pregnant Women, Children Among H1N1 Vaccine Priorities

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women, health care workers, and children who are aged 6 months and older should be the first to receive this fall's H1N1 swine flu vaccine, according to recommendations made July 29 by a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) panel.

More Information

Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Has Low Short-Term Risks

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery have a minimal short-term risk of death and other major adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Antipsychotic Drugs May Pose Risk to Older Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Older diabetic patients are at significant risk of hospitalization due to hyperglycemia when they are prescribed antipsychotic medication, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Type 1 Diabetes Complications Becoming Less Common

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive therapy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus reduces the frequency of serious complications over the long term, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

One in Seven Low-Income Children Still Obese

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity among low-income, preschool-aged children has not reduced in recent years and remains at 14.6 percent for 2008, despite the fact that the target prevalence set out in the Healthy People 2010 objectives is just 5 percent, according to a study published in the July 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Urinary Tract Symptoms

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Younger men with lower urinary tract symptoms are significantly more likely to exhibit metabolic syndrome than men without urinary tract symptoms, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

Abstract - Arnold
Full Text
Abstract - Dolan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

'Enhanced' Meat High in Phosphate and Potassium

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Uncooked meat and poultry products that have been "enhanced" with additives during processing often have much higher levels of phosphate and potassium compared with their additive-free versions, though the additives may not be listed on the label, according to a study published online July 23 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Marker of Renal Injury May Aid in Diagnosis

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a marker of renal tubular injury, are higher in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) and in critically ill patients who develop acute kidney injury, according to two studies published online July 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract - Paragas
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Siew
Full Text

Heart Disease Prevalence Increasing in Canada

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In Canada, heart disease prevalence and cardiovascular disease risk factors are increasing among nearly all income groups, according to a study published online July 20 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Flu Vaccine Effects Uncertain in Immunocompromised

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Though roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population is immunocompromised for a variety of reasons, data on the efficacy of influenza vaccines in these individuals are scarce, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treatment Can Reduce Bone Turnover in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of bone metastases in prostate cancer patients with denosumab, which blocks bone resorption, reduces bone turnover compared with bisphosphonates, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

England's Pay-for-Performance Scheme Faulted

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The 2004 pay-for-performance scheme for family practices in England resulted in short-term quality of care improvements for asthma and diabetes, but not for heart disease, and ultimately was associated with a long-term slowing in the rate of improvement for all three conditions, according to an article published in the July 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Phototherapy Can Help Heal Stubborn Diabetic Leg Ulcers

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Phototherapy can speed up the healing of diabetic leg ulcers that have not responded to other treatments, according to a report in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Healthy Lifestyle Shown to Greatly Reduce Heart Risks

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy lifestyle is associated with a significantly reduced risk of hypertension in younger women and of heart failure in older men, according to two studies in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Forman
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Djousse
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Modest Glucose Control Linked to Fewer Deaths in Diabetics

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Modest glucose control is associated with fewer deaths in patients with diabetes and heart failure, according to a study in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Approves 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an influenza vaccine for the 2009-2010 season, according to a news release issued July 20 by the FDA.

More Information

Sox17 Eyed in Pancreas, Biliary System Development

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The Sox17 gene appears to play a necessary role in whether embryonic progenitor cells develop into pancreatic or biliary cells, according to research published in the July 21 issue of Developmental Cell that offers insights into a potential cure for type 1 diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Age of Undescended Testis Linked to Germ Cell Loss

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children with cryptorchidism, the longer an affected testis remains undescended, the greater the risk of the loss of germ cells and Leydig cells, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Education Helps Diabetics Control Metabolic Values

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Just three sessions of diabetes education can improve the metabolic control of patients with type 2 diabetes, indicating that client-centered diabetes care programs can help such patients improve their health profile, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Supplements May Cut Depression Symptoms

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treating women with seasonal depression using a vitamin D supplement can reduce depressive symptoms, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including hypertension, heart failure and ischemic heart disease, according to a recent symposium on nutrition and heart disease summarized in the July issue of the American Journal of the Medical Sciences.

American Journal of the Medical Sciences

Treatment Reverses Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse Model

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, treatment with anti-CD3 antibody and transplantation of pancreatic anlagen resulted in restoration of β-cell function and long-term diabetes recovery, according to research published online July 9 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Rates Highest Among African-American Population

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity is far higher among African-Americans than Caucasians in America, and Hispanics also have significantly higher obesity rates, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Sunitinib Found Effective, Safe in Advanced Kidney Cancer

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma with poor prognosis who are not usually entered into clinical trials, sunitinib significantly prolongs progression-free and overall survival and is well-tolerated, according to a study published online July 16 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Reflection & Reaction (subscription or payment may be required)

Healthy Lifestyle Demonstrates Gains in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have a healthy diet and engage in physical activity are less likely than their counterparts with less healthy lifestyles to undergo excessive gestational weight gain, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Thyroid Cancer Incidence on Rise Since Late 1980s

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer increased in recent decades, with patterns indicating the rise was not merely due to increased detection, according to research published online July 13 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Active Commuting Associated With Improved Overall Health

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who commute to work by foot or by bike tend to be fitter than those who passively commute, according to a study published in the July 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise Beneficial in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, increased physical activity and fitness have beneficial effects on metabolic indices such as liver enzymes and insulin resistance, according to a study published in the July issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Caloric Restriction Linked to Slowed Aging in Monkeys

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Caloric restriction is associated with a delayed onset of age-related disease and less age-related death in rhesus monkeys, according to research published in the July 10 issue of Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Stroke Associated With High Care Costs

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- In children, acute stroke is costly to treat and may lead to an even greater lifetime cost of care than acute adult stroke, and in young adults with a first-ever ischemic stroke, mostly modifiable factors are independently associated with long-term mortality, according to two studies published online July 9 in Stroke.

Abstract - Perkins
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Putaala
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dialysis May Be Resumed Safely After Heart Attack

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with end-stage renal disease who have heart attacks, resumption of dialysis has no significant effect on morbidity or mortality, according to a study published online July 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dietary Oils May Help Weight Loss in Diabetic Older Women

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The dietary oils, conjugated linoleic acid and safflower oil, may help postmenopausal women with diabetes mellitus to lose weight, according to a study published online June 17 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Rates for American Adults Still Going Up

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- At least 25 percent of the adult population in 32 states is now obese, and national prevalence of obesity has risen from 25.6 percent in 2007 to 26.1 percent in 2008, according to a July 8 report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Press Release
More Information

More Complications After Joint Replacement With Diabetes

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with uncontrolled diabetes are at higher risk of complications and mortality after knee or hip total joint arthroplasty than patients with controlled diabetes, according to research published in the July 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adiponectin Linked to Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of race, people with higher levels of the protein adiponectin may have a significantly lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Protein in Non-Metastatic Tumors May Inhibit Metastasis

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Prosaposin, a protein secreted by non-metastatic tumors, inhibits metastasis by producing factors that inhibit angiogenesis, and may be a potential cancer treatment, according to a study published online July 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Internet Has Potential to Change Behavior

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based intervention is an effective tool to treat insomnia, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that Web-based games may be useful to help low-income African-American children make healthy snack food choices.

Abstract - Ritterband
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Pempek and Calvert
Full Text

Parental Autoimmune Disease Linked to Autism in Children

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of some autoimmune diseases may be associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders and infantile autism in children, according to a study published online July 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bone Loss Process Not Clear in Hypercalciuria, Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Bone loss in patients with hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis results from a poorly understood breakdown of the body's mineral metabolism involving the kidneys, the intestines and the bones themselves, according to a literature review reported in the July issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ghrelin May Play Role in Alcohol Dependence

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to its already known function in the regulation of eating, central ghrelin signaling appears to be necessary for the rewarding properties of alcohol, according to research published online June 29 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

Spine Surgeons Faulted in Elderly Screenings

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients, many spine surgeons may be unwilling to perform routine osteoporosis or osteomalacia workups despite the high incidence of these conditions in this population, according to a study published in the July issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- There is no strong association between metabolic syndrome and increased risk of breast cancer, but there is an association between some of the components of the syndrome and increased risk of the disease, according to a study published online June 30 in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Losartan, Enalapril May Not Slow Diabetic Nephropathy

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that blockade the renin-angiotensin system may not reduce progression of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes, but they do slow the progression of retinopathy, according to a study published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Calls for Chantix, Zyban to Feature Boxed Warning

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing information for the smoking cessation drugs varenicline (Chantix) and buproprion (Zyban) must feature a boxed warning that discusses potentially serious mental health changes linked to the drugs, according to an announcement July 1 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

FDA News Release

Ketamine Appears Safe for Intubation in Critical Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ketamine is safe for use in endotracheal intubation for critically ill patients -- particularly those with sepsis -- compared to etomidate, according to research published online July 1 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Statins May Protect Those at Risk From Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Using statins to treat people with cardiovascular risks, but without cardiovascular disease, significantly improves survival and reduces incidence of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online June 30 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Priorities Set for Comparative Effectiveness Research

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The extent to which large-scale public investment in comparative effectiveness research can achieve its goals of better decision making and improved uptake of new knowledge depends on engaging the medical profession and patients, according to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text
Editorial - Luce
Editorial - Iglehart
Editorial - Conway & Clancy
More Information

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: July 2009 Briefing - Dermatology Next: July 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.