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July 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves New Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved saxagliptin (Onglyza) to treat type 2 diabetes in adults, according to a release issued July 31.

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Lupus Patients Exhibit Lower Response to Flu Vaccine

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be more susceptible to influenza infection after vaccination because of impaired cell-mediated and antibody responses, according to a study in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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UV Tanning Beds Classified as Human Carcinogen

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Ultraviolet (UV) tanning beds should be considered carcinogenic, according to a World Health Organization working group writing in the August issue of The Lancet Oncology.

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Integrated Care of Ill Children Often Improves Nutrition

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy, launched by UNICEF and the World Health Organization in the mid-1990s, has resulted in better breast-feeding rates and decreased stunting in a rural area of Bangladesh, according to a study published in the August 1 issue of The Lancet.

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Laboratory Worker Infected With Vaccinia Virus

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- A laboratory worker in Virginia became infected with the vaccinia virus, leading to severe eye and ear infection, and the tracing of 102 potential contacts, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Enjoying Leisure Time Boosts Health and Well-Being

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging in enjoyable activities during leisure time is associated with better physical health and lower likelihood of depression, according to a study published online July 10 in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine.

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Financial Incentives Boost Access to Prenatal Care

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Offering financial incentives to patients and their obstetricians or midwives encourages timely and comprehensive prenatal care, according to a study published online July 13 in Health Services Research.

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Muscle Density Linked to Hospitalization in Aged

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Lower strength and muscle density are associated with a higher risk of hospitalization in the elderly, according to research published online July 29 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Family Calcium Intake Linked to Children's Health Outcomes

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- A family diet high in calcium during childhood may be associated with a lower risk of death from stroke later in life, according to research published online July 29 in Heart.

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Higher Rheumatoid Arthritis Burden Seen in Poorer Nations

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of rheumatoid arthritis appears to be greater in less affluent countries compared to wealthier countries, according to research published online July 30 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Abdominal Aortic Calcium Linked to Coronary Calcium

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) are strongly associated with high levels of coronary artery calcium (CAC), according to a study in the August 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Antifungal Properties of Breast Cancer Drug Defined

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may have activities against pathogenic yeast and may interfere with the function of calmodulin in its role as an antifungal agent, according to a study in the August issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

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Gene Nanoparticles May Slow Ovarian Tumor Growth

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Injection of nanoparticles encoding the gene for a diphtheria toxin suicide protein (DT-A) into mice with ovarian tumors reduced tumor burden, slowed the growth of the tumors and increased the lifespan of the mice, pointing to a potential therapy for advanced ovarian cancer, according to a study in the August 1 issue of Cancer Research.

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Radiologist Workload Rises Overall, but Varies by Practice

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The workload for radiologists has increased 34 percent overall since the early 1990s, but there is considerable variation in the number of procedures performed each year by individual radiology practices, according to a study in the August issue of Radiology.

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Factors Linked to Hyperglycemia Care Identified

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients are more likely to experience sustained hyperglycemia if they are older and African-American, and are more likely to experience delays in receiving appropriate treatment if they have lower incomes, lower medication adherence, fewer physician visits and higher drug copayments, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Predictors Identified for Progression of Benign MS

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive assessment tests and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can predict future disease progression in patients with benign multiple sclerosis (B-MS), according to a study published online July 29 in Neurology.

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Natural Killer Cells Implicated in Onset of Biliary Atresia

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Natural killer cell activity appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia, according to research published July 6 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Pregnant Women, Children Among H1N1 Vaccine Priorities

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women, health care workers, and children who are aged 6 months and older should be the first to receive this fall's H1N1 swine flu vaccine, according to recommendations made July 29 by a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) panel.

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Malaria Presents Significant but Resolvable Challenges

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- As malaria becomes more resistant to standard therapy, a sustained commitment to the development of life-saving interventions, including vaccines, has become imperative, according to a series of studies published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Has Low Short-Term Risks

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery have a minimal short-term risk of death and other major adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physical Activity Intensity Linked to Cancer Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Leisure-time physical activity at a moderately intense level or greater appears to offer more benefit in preventing cancer-related death in men than low-intensity physical activity, according to research published online July 28 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Can Children Headed for Teen Depression Be Spotted Early?

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- It is possible to identify children at risk for development of depressive symptoms as early as age 7, offering the opportunity for early intervention to avert teenage depression, according to a study published online April 5 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

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H1N1 Flu Infection Poses Special Danger in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- The novel H1N1 influenza virus poses a particularly high risk of hospitalization and death in pregnant women and all pregnant women with known or suspected infection should receive prompt antiviral treatment, according to a July 29 statement from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the corresponding paper published online July 29 in The Lancet. Vaccination for well pregnant women is also urged.

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Antipsychotic Drugs May Pose Risk to Older Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Older diabetic patients are at significant risk of hospitalization due to hyperglycemia when they are prescribed antipsychotic medication, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Older Cancer Survivors Report Good Quality of Life

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Older long-term cancer survivors rate their quality of life better than the norms for their age despite a tendency to poor health behaviors, according to a study published online July 27 in Cancer.

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Prostate Cancer Vaccine Elicits Immune Response

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine against a prostate tumor antigen is safe, elicits an immune response, and may increase prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with recurrent prostate cancer, according to an early-stage study published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Stress Levels With Prostate Active Surveillance Measured

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Most men with early prostate cancer who are following the active surveillance protocol are generally able to manage the mental stress of their situation very well; factors such as a neurotic personality score, high prostate-specific antigen, and poor health are associated with increased anxiety, according to a study published online July 27 in Cancer.

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Ischemia Risk May Be Linked to Exercise Capacity

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at intermediate to high risk of coronary artery disease are at low risk of developing ischemia if they are able to reach a high exercise workload during an exercise stress test, according to a study in the August 4 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Primary Care Identification of Depression Examined

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- General practitioners correctly identify only about half of patients with depression, and misidentifications outnumber missed cases, according to a study published online July 28 in The Lancet.

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Risk Factors May Predict Fast Knee Cartilage Loss

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with no or minimal structural osteoarthritis, baseline factors including overweight and obesity are strong predictors of significant fast tibiofemoral cartilage loss, according to a study published online July 27 in Radiology.

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Depression Rate Studied in Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term cancer survivors have similar rates of depression as adults without a cancer history, though they may experience greater impairment from depression in their daily life, according to a study published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Caregiver Closeness May Slow Alzheimer's Disease Progress

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with Alzheimer's disease who have a closer relationship with their caregiver -- especially when the caregiver is a spouse -- may have a slower progression of cognitive and functional symptoms, according to research published online June 29 in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences.

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Early Child Care Linked to Adiposity in Toddlers

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Early child care -- especially in someone else's home -- is associated with increased measures of adiposity at ages 1 and 3 years, according to a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Medication Usage High in U.S. Children Under 12

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- In any given week, more than half of American children under the age of 12 years take at least one medication, and about one-quarter take multiple medications, primarily over-the-counter products, according to a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Autism Linked to Some Gastrointestinal Symptoms

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Parental Stress Seen to Play Role in Pollution-Asthma Link

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose parents are under more stress may be more likely to develop asthma associated with traffic-related pollution or smoking in utero, according to research published online July 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Review Shows Benefits of Massage in Low Back Pain

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Massage may offer long-lasting benefits in individuals with subacute or chronic nonspecific low back pain, according to research published in the July 15 issue of Spine.

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Physically Active Children Fall Asleep Faster

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime physical activity is associated with faster sleep latency in children, and the more inactive children are, the harder it is for them to fall asleep at the end of the day, according to a study published online July 24 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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One in Seven Low-Income Children Still Obese

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity among low-income, preschool-aged children has not reduced in recent years and remains at 14.6 percent for 2008, despite the fact that the target prevalence set out in the Healthy People 2010 objectives is just 5 percent, according to a study published in the July 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Method Decreased Wait Times at Urology Practice

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In urological practices, a streamlined scheduling system may improve access for new patients, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Stroke Patients Need More Than Words to Get Active

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Using verbal encouragement does not appear to result in increased physical activity in patients who have had an ischemic stroke, according to a study published online July 22 in BMJ.

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H1N1 Can Cause Neurologic Complications in Children

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 influenza can lead to neurologic complications in children, according to a study published in the July 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

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Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Complications of Acute Otitis Media Becoming More Common

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with acute otitis media, the frequency of acute mastoiditis, as well as mastoid subperiosteal abscesses, is apparently increasing over time, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Computerized Hospital Discharge Reassures Patients

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and their outpatient physicians are more satisfied with hospital discharge when the process involves computerized physician order entry rather than handwritten notes, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Linoleic Acid May Be Cause of Some Ulcerative Colitis Cases

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary intake of linoleic acid may be the cause of 30 percent of cases of ulcerative colitis, according to a study published online July 23 in Gut.

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Some Improvements Seen in Hip Fracture Pain Practices

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults with hip fractures, pain assessment and management practices in emergency departments have improved since new standards were issued by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, but the level of care still does not consistently meet best practice guidelines, according to a study published in the July Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Lasers May Provide an Alternative to Liposuction

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In the first trial of its kind, Massachusetts researchers used a laser to destroy adipose tissue, a noninvasive approach that may someday provide an alternative to liposuction, according to a report in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Heart Disease Prevalence Increasing in Canada

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In Canada, heart disease prevalence and cardiovascular disease risk factors are increasing among nearly all income groups, according to a study published online July 20 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Flu Vaccine Effects Uncertain in Immunocompromised

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Though roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population is immunocompromised for a variety of reasons, data on the efficacy of influenza vaccines in these individuals are scarce, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Effect of Different Vaccines in H5N1 Pandemic Compared

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccines against H5N1 influenza containing non-aluminum adjuvant might be the best formulation for immunizing the public in the event of a pandemic, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Researchers, Officials Disagree on Privacy Rule

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer researchers and compliance officers often disagree on how to comply with the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule in regards to cancer research, and additional training and best practice standards are needed, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Treatment Can Reduce Bone Turnover in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of bone metastases in prostate cancer patients with denosumab, which blocks bone resorption, reduces bone turnover compared with bisphosphonates, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Revised Labor Induction Guidelines Published

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Revised guidelines have been published detailing how and under what circumstances to induce labor, according to a practice bulletin issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Emergency Clinicians Need Training to Treat Blast Injuries

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- With the increasing incidence of terrorist attacks worldwide, civilian emergency clinicians need training on managing the unique injuries that occur in explosions, according to a paper published online July 23 in the The Lancet.

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Antihypertensive Drugs Associated With Cataracts

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated with beta blockers for hypertension are more likely than their counterparts not using the drugs to develop cataracts and require cataract surgery, according to a study published online July 23 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Gene Variants Found in Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- About 5 percent of patients with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome have variants of the thrombomodulin gene that impair its ability to inactivate an immune pathway, according to a study in the July 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Combo Treatments Appear to Be Equally Effective for Hep C

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection, three different treatment regimens of standard-dose or low-dose peginterferon alpha-2b or peginterferon alfa-2a, in combination with ribavirin are equally safe and effective, according to a study published online July 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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England's Pay-for-Performance Scheme Faulted

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The 2004 pay-for-performance scheme for family practices in England resulted in short-term quality of care improvements for asthma and diabetes, but not for heart disease, and ultimately was associated with a long-term slowing in the rate of improvement for all three conditions, according to an article published in the July 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Most Critically Ill Infants Receive Pain Relief

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most critically ill infants undergoing minor painful procedures at an Australian hospital received pain relief, more than reported in previous studies, according to an article in the July issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Phototherapy Can Help Heal Stubborn Diabetic Leg Ulcers

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Phototherapy can speed up the healing of diabetic leg ulcers that have not responded to other treatments, according to a report in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Impact of School Closings on Flu Pandemic Still Unknown

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Though school closures could potentially help reduce the impact of an influenza pandemic, many economic and societal aspects related to closing schools need to be further investigated, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Blunt Needles May Cause Less Surgical Glove Perforations

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The use of blunt needles may be associated with fewer glove perforations during closure following Caesarean delivery, but with lower physician satisfaction with the needles, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Hospitalizations Rising for Adult Congenital Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for adults with congenital heart disease have more than doubled between the years 1998 and 2005 in the United States, with even greater increases in costs, according to a study in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Most Female Surgeons Happy With Career Choice

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most women surgeons are happy with their choice of career, but they also value maternity leave, at-work child care and the option of working part time, more than their male counterparts do, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Hormonal Contraceptives Can Be Safe for Many With Lupus

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The use of hormonal contraception appears to be appropriate in many women with lupus, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Models Help Anticipate Early Delivery in Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Two prediction models using analysis of amniotic or cervical fluids may help identify which pregnant women in preterm labor will deliver within seven days, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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More Lymph Node Checks May Not Help Cancer Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Retrieving a high number of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer patients does not help to identify more patients with stage III cases of the disease, a finding which undermines the case for retrieval of at least 12 lymph nodes as a benchmark quality measure of surgical treatment, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Healthy Lifestyle Shown to Greatly Reduce Heart Risks

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy lifestyle is associated with a significantly reduced risk of hypertension in younger women and of heart failure in older men, according to two studies in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Genes Play Role in Racial Heart Failure Differences

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Gene polymorphisms may explain differences in beta-blocker treatment response in Caucasians and African-Americans with heart failure, and palliative care should be integrated into comprehensive heart failure treatment throughout the course of its management, according to two articles published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, focusing on heart failure.

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New York City Ban on Trans Fat Having Nationwide Effect

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- New York City's first-ever ban on artificial trans fat in restaurant food has sparked a nationwide move away from the substance by food chains, and has prompted a dozen other local governments and the state of California to enact similar bans, according to an article in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Three-Year Outcomes Similar in Men, Women Given Stents

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men have similar three-year outcomes following coronary stent placement, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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IV Immunoglobulin Treatment May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Prior treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for indications not having to do with Alzheimer's disease may lower the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and Alzheimer's disease-related disorders (ADRD), according to a study in the July 21 issue of Neurology.

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High-Risk Individuals Often Underestimate Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals with Lynch syndrome underestimate their cancer risk if the results of their genetic test are unclear, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HIV Genetic Tests Associated With Improved Survival

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Taking the HIV-1 genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility testing (GPT) to guide antiretroviral treatment selection is associated with improved survival of HIV-infected adults, according to a study in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Colonoscopy Series Assesses Adenoma Recurrence Risk

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with prior adenoma, looking back at findings from the last two colonoscopies, rather than just the most recent colonoscopy, can help identify patients at low risk for adenoma recurrence who require less frequent surveillance, according to a study in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Modest Glucose Control Linked to Fewer Deaths in Diabetics

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Modest glucose control is associated with fewer deaths in patients with diabetes and heart failure, according to a study in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Breast Cancer Risk From Childhood Radiation Quantified

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Female survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of breast cancer that has a linear relationship with radiation dose, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Ultrasound Can Help Diagnose Benign Skin Lesions

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound is a useful tool to diagnose benign subcutaneous lesions and could reduce the number of lesions referred to a hospital for treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Baseline Function Can Affect Change After Prostate Therapy

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effect of prostate cancer treatments on men's sexual, bowel, and urinary function depends on patients' baseline levels of function, according to research published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Internet Asthma Program May Be Superior to Usual Care

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based asthma management program is more effective than usual care in controlling asthma and increasing the number of symptom-free days, according to a study in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Studies Shed Light on Sodium-Blood Pressure Connections

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- A reduction of salt intake leads to decreases in blood pressure in African-Americans, Caucasians and Asians; reduces blood pressure in those with resistant hypertension; and may have other physiologic benefits, according to two studies published online July 20 in Hypertension.

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FDA Approves 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an influenza vaccine for the 2009-2010 season, according to a news release issued July 20 by the FDA.

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Children's Behavior May Improve After Adenotonsillectomy

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children who undergo adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing, improvements in sleep and behavior occur but may not be exactly maintained over time or reach baseline levels, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Obesity Not an Obstacle for Prostate Specific Antigen Test

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- A patient's weight does not significantly affect the usefulness of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing to determine prostate cancer, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Age of Undescended Testis Linked to Germ Cell Loss

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children with cryptorchidism, the longer an affected testis remains undescended, the greater the risk of the loss of germ cells and Leydig cells, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Multidisciplinary Approach Recommended for Pelvic Pain

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a commentary on three diverse studies in the August Journal of Urology, a leading urologist advocates a multidisciplinary approach to unravel the complex pathologies of pelvic pain, prostatitis, painful bladder syndrome, and interstitial cystitis.

Commentary - Moon (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Tekin
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Abstract - Liang
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Abstract - FitzGerald
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Education Helps Diabetics Control Metabolic Values

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Just three sessions of diabetes education can improve the metabolic control of patients with type 2 diabetes, indicating that client-centered diabetes care programs can help such patients improve their health profile, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
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Vitamin D Supplements May Cut Depression Symptoms

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treating women with seasonal depression using a vitamin D supplement can reduce depressive symptoms, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
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Depression, Insomnia Affect Many Prostate Cancer Patients

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many men with prostate cancer suffer from insomnia, depression and distress, and younger men as well as those receiving radiation therapy are most at risk, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
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Teen Exposure to Tobacco-Related Content on Web Analyzed

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who surf the Internet are exposed to a very small volume of tobacco-related content, and not all of the exposure is pro-tobacco, according to a study published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Infant Urgent Care Decisions Vary Widely Across Hospitals

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Decisions about newborn care, especially those made in urgent situations, vary among hospitals, pointing to the need for clear clinical guidelines and careful weighing of treatment goals and side effects, according to two studies published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Zecca
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