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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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July 2009 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Hepatitis C Virus Viremia Linked to Higher Mortality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at higher risk of death if they have markers of viremia, according to a study in the August issue of Hepatology. A related study in the same issue found that HCV infection is associated with a higher risk of death, although this risk is reduced after long-term treatment.

Abstract - Butt
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Abstract - Uto
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Editorial

Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Maro
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Abstract - Pace
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Natural Killer Cells Implicated in Onset of Biliary Atresia

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Natural killer cell activity appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia, according to research published July 6 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Pregnant Women, Children Among H1N1 Vaccine Priorities

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women, health care workers, and children who are aged 6 months and older should be the first to receive this fall's H1N1 swine flu vaccine, according to recommendations made July 29 by a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) panel.

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Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Has Low Short-Term Risks

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery have a minimal short-term risk of death and other major adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physical Activity Intensity Linked to Cancer Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Leisure-time physical activity at a moderately intense level or greater appears to offer more benefit in preventing cancer-related death in men than low-intensity physical activity, according to research published online July 28 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Older Cancer Survivors Report Good Quality of Life

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Older long-term cancer survivors rate their quality of life better than the norms for their age despite a tendency to poor health behaviors, according to a study published online July 27 in Cancer.

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Autism Linked to Some Gastrointestinal Symptoms

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

Abstract - Arnold
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Abstract - Dolan
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Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Hurdle Overcome

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A virus that normally infects lung cells and causes the common cold has been successfully used to deliver sufficient levels of the gene defective in cystic fibrosis, overcoming a major hurdle to using gene therapy to correct the disease, according to a study published online July 21 in PLoS Biology.

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Linoleic Acid May Be Cause of Some Ulcerative Colitis Cases

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary intake of linoleic acid may be the cause of 30 percent of cases of ulcerative colitis, according to a study published online July 23 in Gut.

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Flu Vaccine Effects Uncertain in Immunocompromised

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Though roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population is immunocompromised for a variety of reasons, data on the efficacy of influenza vaccines in these individuals are scarce, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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Emergency Clinicians Need Training to Treat Blast Injuries

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- With the increasing incidence of terrorist attacks worldwide, civilian emergency clinicians need training on managing the unique injuries that occur in explosions, according to a paper published online July 23 in the The Lancet.

Abstract
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Combo Treatments Appear to Be Equally Effective for Hep C

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection, three different treatment regimens of standard-dose or low-dose peginterferon alpha-2b or peginterferon alfa-2a, in combination with ribavirin are equally safe and effective, according to a study published online July 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prolonged AIDS Treatment May Help Control Hepatitis B

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who are co-infected with HIV and the hepatitis B virus, prolonged use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may help control hepatitis B virus infection and delay or prevent liver complications, according to a study in the May/June issue of HIV Clinical Trials.

Abstract
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More Lymph Node Checks May Not Help Cancer Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Retrieving a high number of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer patients does not help to identify more patients with stage III cases of the disease, a finding which undermines the case for retrieval of at least 12 lymph nodes as a benchmark quality measure of surgical treatment, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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High-Risk Individuals Often Underestimate Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals with Lynch syndrome underestimate their cancer risk if the results of their genetic test are unclear, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Colonoscopy Series Assesses Adenoma Recurrence Risk

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with prior adenoma, looking back at findings from the last two colonoscopies, rather than just the most recent colonoscopy, can help identify patients at low risk for adenoma recurrence who require less frequent surveillance, according to a study in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sox17 Eyed in Pancreas, Biliary System Development

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The Sox17 gene appears to play a necessary role in whether embryonic progenitor cells develop into pancreatic or biliary cells, according to research published in the July 21 issue of Developmental Cell that offers insights into a potential cure for type 1 diabetes.

Abstract
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Treatment Reverses Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse Model

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, treatment with anti-CD3 antibody and transplantation of pancreatic anlagen resulted in restoration of β-cell function and long-term diabetes recovery, according to research published online July 9 in Endocrinology.

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Obesity Rates Highest Among African-American Population

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity is far higher among African-Americans than Caucasians in America, and Hispanics also have significantly higher obesity rates, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Drug Groups Causing Liver Transplantation Identified

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen, antiepileptics, antibiotics, and antituberculosis agents are the leading drug groups responsible for liver transplantation resulting from drug-induced acute liver failure (DIALF), according to research published in the July issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Capsule Endoscopy Found Inferior to Colonoscopy

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In the detection of colorectal polyps and cancer, capsule endoscopy has low rates of sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional colonoscopy, according to a study published in the July 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Sheds Light on Crohn's Disease Pathogenesis

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found a link between two inflammatory signaling pathways in Crohn's disease that could influence the pathogenesis of the disease, according to a study published online July 9 in Current Biology.

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Economic Factors at Play in Cancer Survival Among Races

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- After controlling for factors including socioeconomic status, survival differences between African-American and Caucasian patients with colorectal cancer ceased to become statistically significant, according to research published online July 13 in Cancer.

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Health-Related Quality of Life May Predict Cirrhosis Survival

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Health-related quality of life is a predictor of survival in cirrhosis patients who are in need of liver transplantation, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Exercise Beneficial in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, increased physical activity and fitness have beneficial effects on metabolic indices such as liver enzymes and insulin resistance, according to a study published in the July issue of Hepatology.

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Diet May Influence Liver Disease Progression

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary nutrient composition may be associated with an increased or decreased long-term risk of developing cirrhosis or liver cancer, according to a study published in the July issue of Hepatology.

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Caloric Restriction Linked to Slowed Aging in Monkeys

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Caloric restriction is associated with a delayed onset of age-related disease and less age-related death in rhesus monkeys, according to research published in the July 10 issue of Science.

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Anti-TNF Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Linked to Tuberculosis

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) monoclonal antibody therapy is associated with a higher risk of tuberculosis than soluble TNF receptor therapy, according to research published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Endoscopy Feasible for Dyspepsia Patients 50 and Up

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopy of dyspepsia patients 50 and older who do not have severe symptoms is reasonable and worth the high cost, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Barrett's Esophagus Surveillance Needs Improvement

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopist adherence to surveillance guidelines calling for extensive biopsies for people with Barrett's esophagus is poor, which results in reduced detection of dysplasia, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Probiotics May Not Help Treat Severe Malnutrition

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adding probiotics and prebiotics to ready-to-use high-energy food to treat African children with severe, acute malnutrition does not improve outcomes, according to a study published in the July 11 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Post-Vaccine Rotavirus Season Was Unusually Mild

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- After the introduction of routine infant rotavirus vaccination in 2006, the 2007/2008 rotavirus season was significantly milder compared to previous seasons, according to a study published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Single-Dose Versus Split-Dose Treatment of Colitis Examined

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis, a single 2-gram dose of mesalamine (5-aminosalicylate) daily is better than two 1-gram doses daily, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Obesity Rates for American Adults Still Going Up

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- At least 25 percent of the adult population in 32 states is now obese, and national prevalence of obesity has risen from 25.6 percent in 2007 to 26.1 percent in 2008, according to a July 8 report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Sex-Specific Cancer Death Risk Higher in African-Americans

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- African-American patients with sex-specific cancers had worse mortality than patients of other races despite similar therapies and follow-up, according to a study published online July 7 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Breath Test Detects Absorptive Disorder in Small Intestine

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The 13C-sucrose breath test (SBT) offers a noninvasive way to test the absorptive integrity of the small intestine, according to a study conducted with Australian Aboriginal children and reported online July 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Parental Autoimmune Disease Linked to Autism in Children

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of some autoimmune diseases may be associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders and infantile autism in children, according to a study published online July 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Famotidine May Prevent Peptic Ulcers in Patients on Aspirin

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The H2-receptor agonist famotidine prevents gastric and duodenal ulcers, as well as erosive esophagitis, in patients taking low-dose aspirin, according to a study published online July 6 in The Lancet.

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Fat Intake Linked to Higher Pancreatic Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of saturated fats, especially from animal foods, may be associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, according to research published online June 26 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Mood Appears to Affect Brain's Processing of Pain

FRIDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' emotional state may affect the way they process painful stimuli, even when it appears to have no impact on subjective responses to pain, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Celiac Disease Seen as Burgeoning Health Threat

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- During the past 50 years, the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease may have increased by more than four-fold, and undiagnosed disease is associated with a nearly four-fold increased risk of mortality, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Mayo Clinic Streamlines Protocol Development

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- At the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, a project using focused process engineering has significantly accelerated the development and approval of clinical trials, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Ghrelin May Play Role in Alcohol Dependence

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to its already known function in the regulation of eating, central ghrelin signaling appears to be necessary for the rewarding properties of alcohol, according to research published online June 29 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Proton Pump Inhibitors May Induce Acid Symptoms

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- After proton pump inhibitor therapy is withdrawn, patients may be likely to experience acid-related symptoms, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Useful in Crohn's Disease

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Crohn's disease, contrast-enhanced ultrasound can accurately assess disease activity, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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New Pediatric CT Protocols Can Reduce Radiation Dose

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric patients, new computed tomography protocols based on clinical indications, patient weight, and number of prior studies may result in significant dose reduction and high compliance, according to a study published in the July issue of Radiology.

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Priorities Set for Comparative Effectiveness Research

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The extent to which large-scale public investment in comparative effectiveness research can achieve its goals of better decision making and improved uptake of new knowledge depends on engaging the medical profession and patients, according to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Editorial - Luce
Editorial - Iglehart
Editorial - Conway & Clancy
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