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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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July 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Integrated Care of Ill Children Often Improves Nutrition

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy, launched by UNICEF and the World Health Organization in the mid-1990s, has resulted in better breast-feeding rates and decreased stunting in a rural area of Bangladesh, according to a study published in the August 1 issue of The Lancet.

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Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Family Calcium Intake Linked to Children's Health Outcomes

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- A family diet high in calcium during childhood may be associated with a lower risk of death from stroke later in life, according to research published online July 29 in Heart.

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Natural Killer Cells Implicated in Onset of Biliary Atresia

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Natural killer cell activity appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia, according to research published July 6 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Pregnant Women, Children Among H1N1 Vaccine Priorities

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women, health care workers, and children who are aged 6 months and older should be the first to receive this fall's H1N1 swine flu vaccine, according to recommendations made July 29 by a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) panel.

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Malaria Presents Significant but Resolvable Challenges

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- As malaria becomes more resistant to standard therapy, a sustained commitment to the development of life-saving interventions, including vaccines, has become imperative, according to a series of studies published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Can Children Headed for Teen Depression Be Spotted Early?

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- It is possible to identify children at risk for development of depressive symptoms as early as age 7, offering the opportunity for early intervention to avert teenage depression, according to a study published online April 5 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

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Early Child Care Linked to Adiposity in Toddlers

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Early child care -- especially in someone else's home -- is associated with increased measures of adiposity at ages 1 and 3 years, according to a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Medication Usage High in U.S. Children Under 12

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- In any given week, more than half of American children under the age of 12 years take at least one medication, and about one-quarter take multiple medications, primarily over-the-counter products, according to a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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New Guidelines Developed for Pediatric Nephrotic Syndrome

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines provide recommendations for the management of pediatric nephrotic syndrome, one of the more common childhood kidney diseases, according to a systematic review in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Autism Linked to Some Gastrointestinal Symptoms

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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New Guidelines Address Quality of Systematic Reviews

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Updated guidelines have been developed to help authors improve the reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, according to an article published online July 21 in PLoS Medicine.

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Stem-Like Cells Identified in Benign Tumors

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Benign tumors contain stem-like cells that can be serially transplanted to generate new tumors, suggesting that such cells in benign as well as malignant tumors may be targets for anti-tumor therapies, according to a study published in the July issue of the British Journal of Cancer.

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Parental Stress Seen to Play Role in Pollution-Asthma Link

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose parents are under more stress may be more likely to develop asthma associated with traffic-related pollution or smoking in utero, according to research published online July 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Physically Active Children Fall Asleep Faster

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime physical activity is associated with faster sleep latency in children, and the more inactive children are, the harder it is for them to fall asleep at the end of the day, according to a study published online July 24 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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One in Seven Low-Income Children Still Obese

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity among low-income, preschool-aged children has not reduced in recent years and remains at 14.6 percent for 2008, despite the fact that the target prevalence set out in the Healthy People 2010 objectives is just 5 percent, according to a study published in the July 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Method Decreased Wait Times at Urology Practice

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In urological practices, a streamlined scheduling system may improve access for new patients, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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H1N1 Can Cause Neurologic Complications in Children

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 influenza can lead to neurologic complications in children, according to a study published in the July 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

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Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Complications of Acute Otitis Media Becoming More Common

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with acute otitis media, the frequency of acute mastoiditis, as well as mastoid subperiosteal abscesses, is apparently increasing over time, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Effect of Different Vaccines in H5N1 Pandemic Compared

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccines against H5N1 influenza containing non-aluminum adjuvant might be the best formulation for immunizing the public in the event of a pandemic, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Most Critically Ill Infants Receive Pain Relief

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most critically ill infants undergoing minor painful procedures at an Australian hospital received pain relief, more than reported in previous studies, according to an article in the July issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Impact of School Closings on Flu Pandemic Still Unknown

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Though school closures could potentially help reduce the impact of an influenza pandemic, many economic and societal aspects related to closing schools need to be further investigated, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Healthy Lifestyle Shown to Greatly Reduce Heart Risks

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy lifestyle is associated with a significantly reduced risk of hypertension in younger women and of heart failure in older men, according to two studies in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New York City Ban on Trans Fat Having Nationwide Effect

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- New York City's first-ever ban on artificial trans fat in restaurant food has sparked a nationwide move away from the substance by food chains, and has prompted a dozen other local governments and the state of California to enact similar bans, according to an article in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Breast Cancer Risk From Childhood Radiation Quantified

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Female survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of breast cancer that has a linear relationship with radiation dose, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Internet Asthma Program May Be Superior to Usual Care

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based asthma management program is more effective than usual care in controlling asthma and increasing the number of symptom-free days, according to a study in the July 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Studies Shed Light on Sodium-Blood Pressure Connections

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- A reduction of salt intake leads to decreases in blood pressure in African-Americans, Caucasians and Asians; reduces blood pressure in those with resistant hypertension; and may have other physiologic benefits, according to two studies published online July 20 in Hypertension.

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FDA Approves 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an influenza vaccine for the 2009-2010 season, according to a news release issued July 20 by the FDA.

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Children's Behavior May Improve After Adenotonsillectomy

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children who undergo adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing, improvements in sleep and behavior occur but may not be exactly maintained over time or reach baseline levels, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Forceps-Associated Palsy Usually Mild, Temporary

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In neonates, facial nerve palsy caused by forceps use is usually mild and resolves without treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Age of Undescended Testis Linked to Germ Cell Loss

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children with cryptorchidism, the longer an affected testis remains undescended, the greater the risk of the loss of germ cells and Leydig cells, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Teen Exposure to Tobacco-Related Content on Web Analyzed

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who surf the Internet are exposed to a very small volume of tobacco-related content, and not all of the exposure is pro-tobacco, according to a study published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Infant Urgent Care Decisions Vary Widely Across Hospitals

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Decisions about newborn care, especially those made in urgent situations, vary among hospitals, pointing to the need for clear clinical guidelines and careful weighing of treatment goals and side effects, according to two studies published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Exposure to Hydrocarbons May Affect IQ

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adversely affects children's later intelligence, according to a study published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Sexual Health Not Improving in Teens and Young Adults

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The sexual and reproductive health status of adolescents and young adults is flattening or worsening after a long period of improvement, according to a new Surveillance Summary published July 17 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vaccination Shifts Course of Rotavirus Infection Patterns

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The timing and course of rotavirus epidemics is dependent on the size of the population that has never been infected, and can be shifted by vaccinating at least 80 percent of children in the population, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of Science.

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Obesity Rates Highest Among African-American Population

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity is far higher among African-Americans than Caucasians in America, and Hispanics also have significantly higher obesity rates, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Negative Emotions Often Surround Bottle-Feeding

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who bottle-feed their infants may be poorly informed on how to properly use this feeding method, and they may feel a range of negative emotions about this choice, according to research published online July 14 in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Drug Groups Causing Liver Transplantation Identified

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen, antiepileptics, antibiotics, and antituberculosis agents are the leading drug groups responsible for liver transplantation resulting from drug-induced acute liver failure (DIALF), according to research published in the July issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Certain Asthma Drugs Have Little Effect on Inflammation

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Long-acting β2-agonists (LABA), such as salmeterol or formoterol, do not reduce inflammation in patients with chronic persistent asthma, according to a meta-analysis in the July issue of Chest.

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Endothelial Cells in Blood May Help Spread Childhood Cancer

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Endothelial cells and progenitor cells circulating in the blood of pediatric cancer patients may play a role in the inception and progression of metastatic disease, according to a study in the July 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

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Chronic Daily Headache Often Subsides in Adolescents

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- In most adolescents with chronic daily headache, symptoms decline over time, but about one-quarter of patients may still experience headache-related disability or daily headaches as young adults, according to a study published online July 15 in Neurology.

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Heart Disease Mortality Flattening in Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although overall age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality has significantly decreased in Scotland since 1986, the rate of decline in younger adults appears to be flattening, primarily because of social inequality, according to a study published online July 14 in BMJ.

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Healthy Lifestyle Demonstrates Gains in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have a healthy diet and engage in physical activity are less likely than their counterparts with less healthy lifestyles to undergo excessive gestational weight gain, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Halo Treatment Effective in Cervical Spine Injury

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Treating traumatic cervical spine injuries with halo vest immobilization (HVI) is a reasonable option, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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History of Periodontitis Linked to Stroke in Men

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A history of periodontitis, but not current periodontal inflammation, is associated with the incidence of stroke and transient ischemic attack in men, according to research published online ahead of print on May 28 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Peer Support Buffers Teen Depression After Terror Attack

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Social support from friends can help buffer depression among adolescents in the aftermath of a terrorist attack, according to a study published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Falls in the Bathtub a Common Cause of Childhood Injury

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Falls in the bathtub or shower are a common cause of childhood injury, especially for children age 4 years and under, according to a study published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Potassium Citrate May Prevent Stones in Ketogenic Diet

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- An oral potassium citrate supplement, Polycitra K, can prevent the formation of kidney stones in children put on a ketogenic diet for intractable epilepsy, according to a study published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Overall Health of Children in America Mixed

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- The overall health of children in the United States is mixed, according to a July report from the federal government on the status of the nation's children and youth, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009.

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Pediatric Stroke Associated With High Care Costs

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- In children, acute stroke is costly to treat and may lead to an even greater lifetime cost of care than acute adult stroke, and in young adults with a first-ever ischemic stroke, mostly modifiable factors are independently associated with long-term mortality, according to two studies published online July 9 in Stroke.

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Probiotics May Not Help Treat Severe Malnutrition

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adding probiotics and prebiotics to ready-to-use high-energy food to treat African children with severe, acute malnutrition does not improve outcomes, according to a study published in the July 11 issue of The Lancet.

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Polygenic Component Linked to Risk of Schizophrenia

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Common polygenic variation may be responsible for a considerable portion of the total genetic variation involved in schizophrenia risk, according to research published online July 1 in Nature.

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Gender Disparities Seen in Research Grant Applications

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Among pediatric residents, gender differences in research grant applications and funding are similar to disparities seen among faculty members, according to a study published July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Post-Vaccine Rotavirus Season Was Unusually Mild

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- After the introduction of routine infant rotavirus vaccination in 2006, the 2007/2008 rotavirus season was significantly milder compared to previous seasons, according to a study published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Researchers Fault Workload for Attending Physicians

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients face unnecessary risks from medical errors because of the practice of allowing attending physicians to work unlimited hours, according to an article published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity Rates for American Adults Still Going Up

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- At least 25 percent of the adult population in 32 states is now obese, and national prevalence of obesity has risen from 25.6 percent in 2007 to 26.1 percent in 2008, according to a July 8 report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Xylitol Effective at Preventing Tooth Decay in Toddlers

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The antibacterial agent xylitol in syrup form can prevent up to 70 percent of cavities in the primary teeth of young children, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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HPV Vaccine Linked to High Efficacy in Neoplasia Reduction

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine shows high efficacy in the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ (CIN2+) associated with HPV-16/18, and may also provide cross-protection of non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types, according to the final analysis of the PATRICIA study published online July 7 in The Lancet.

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Government Program Did Not Cut Teen Pregnancies

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- England's Young People's Development Programme, modeled on the successful U.S. Children's Aid Society's Carrera program and aimed at delaying heterosexual experience, reducing teen pregnancies, cannabis use and drunkenness, did not work and may have increased teen pregnancies, according to a study published online July 7 in BMJ.

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Breath Test Detects Absorptive Disorder in Small Intestine

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The 13C-sucrose breath test (SBT) offers a noninvasive way to test the absorptive integrity of the small intestine, according to a study conducted with Australian Aboriginal children and reported online July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Genetic Tests May Have Value in Heritable Heart Condition

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be useful in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of family members of patients with the condition, according to research published in the July 14 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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More Suicides and Homicides With Rising Unemployment

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rises in the level of unemployment are associated with rises in the number of suicides and homicides, but a reduction in the number of road traffic accident-related deaths, according to a study published online July 8 in The Lancet.

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Teen Smoking Reduced Among Team Sports Participants

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Seeing smokers on the silver screen increases the risk of an adolescent becoming a smoker, but participation in team sports reduces that risk, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Non-Sudden Death Measured in Childhood Cardiomyopathy

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The need to identify risk factors for non-sudden cardiac death in children with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is at least as important as finding risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to research published in the July 14 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Reduced-Dose PCV-7 Schedules May Be Effective

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- In infants, two or three primary doses of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) significantly decrease vaccine serotype pneumococcal carriage, according to a study published in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Adiponectin Linked to Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of race, people with higher levels of the protein adiponectin may have a significantly lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Requires Stronger Label Warnings About Propoxyphene

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken steps to help prevent overdose in patients taking pain medications that contain the opioid propoxyphene, including Darvon and Darvocet, according to a July 7 release issued by the agency.

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Internet Has Potential to Change Behavior

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based intervention is an effective tool to treat insomnia, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that Web-based games may be useful to help low-income African-American children make healthy snack food choices.

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Pulse Oximetry May Detect Heart Defects in Infants Early

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse oximetry of newborns may be able to detect congenital heart disease early and should be studied further for adoption as a routine newborn health assessment, according to a Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), published online July 6 in both Circulation and Pediatrics.

Abstract - Circulation
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Parental Autoimmune Disease Linked to Autism in Children

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of some autoimmune diseases may be associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders and infantile autism in children, according to a study published online July 6 in Pediatrics.

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Researchers Debate Benefits of Prenatal Magnesium Sulfate

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although debate continues about the ability of prenatal magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy in preterm infants, the weight of evidence suggests that it may be beneficial, according to three studies published in the June issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Swine Flu Airborne Transmission Found Inefficient

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The swine-origin 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus, the so-called swine flu, does not spread as efficiently by inhaled respiratory droplets as the common seasonal flu, according to a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported July 2 in Science.

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Hip Screening Methods for Later Arthritis Weighed

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Screening of all newborns for hip dysplasia with a physical exam, along with ultrasound for high-risk infants, appears to be the best of three options for improving the chance of having a non-arthritic hip later in life, according to research published in the July 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Health Woes of Indigenous People Spur Call to Action

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The world's 400 million indigenous people are dramatically more likely than non-indigenous people to suffer from chronic disease and premature mortality, and national and international efforts are needed to correct these disparities, according to two related review articles published July 4 in The Lancet.

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Celiac Disease Seen as Burgeoning Health Threat

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- During the past 50 years, the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease may have increased by more than four-fold, and undiagnosed disease is associated with a nearly four-fold increased risk of mortality, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Mayo Clinic Streamlines Protocol Development

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- At the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, a project using focused process engineering has significantly accelerated the development and approval of clinical trials, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Adolescent Intelligence Link to Adult Mortality Negotiable

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- The association between IQ in adolescence and mortality in later life is almost entirely attenuated by other risk factors, according to a study published online July 1 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Lack of Inpatient Beds Cause of Emergency Room Waits

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Failure to process patients from the emergency department to inpatient beds is at the root of the gridlock, rather than patients with non-urgent conditions, according to a 2009 report by Press Ganey Associates Inc.

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New Pediatric CT Protocols Can Reduce Radiation Dose

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric patients, new computed tomography protocols based on clinical indications, patient weight, and number of prior studies may result in significant dose reduction and high compliance, according to a study published in the July issue of Radiology.

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Losartan, Enalapril May Not Slow Diabetic Nephropathy

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that blockade the renin-angiotensin system may not reduce progression of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes, but they do slow the progression of retinopathy, according to a study published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Calls for Chantix, Zyban to Feature Boxed Warning

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing information for the smoking cessation drugs varenicline (Chantix) and buproprion (Zyban) must feature a boxed warning that discusses potentially serious mental health changes linked to the drugs, according to an announcement July 1 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Antibiotics for Childhood Ear Infections May Raise Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Children treated with amoxicillin for acute otitis media are more likely to experience a recurrent infection than children not treated with antibiotics, according to a study published online June 30 in BMJ.

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Priorities Set for Comparative Effectiveness Research

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The extent to which large-scale public investment in comparative effectiveness research can achieve its goals of better decision making and improved uptake of new knowledge depends on engaging the medical profession and patients, according to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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