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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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July 2009 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Maro
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Enjoying Leisure Time Boosts Health and Well-Being

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging in enjoyable activities during leisure time is associated with better physical health and lower likelihood of depression, according to a study published online July 10 in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine.

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Can Children Headed for Teen Depression Be Spotted Early?

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- It is possible to identify children at risk for development of depressive symptoms as early as age 7, offering the opportunity for early intervention to avert teenage depression, according to a study published online April 5 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

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Antipsychotic Drugs May Pose Risk to Older Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Older diabetic patients are at significant risk of hospitalization due to hyperglycemia when they are prescribed antipsychotic medication, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Stress Levels With Prostate Active Surveillance Measured

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Most men with early prostate cancer who are following the active surveillance protocol are generally able to manage the mental stress of their situation very well; factors such as a neurotic personality score, high prostate-specific antigen, and poor health are associated with increased anxiety, according to a study published online July 27 in Cancer.

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Primary Care Identification of Depression Examined

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- General practitioners correctly identify only about half of patients with depression, and misidentifications outnumber missed cases, according to a study published online July 28 in The Lancet.

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Depression Rate Studied in Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term cancer survivors have similar rates of depression as adults without a cancer history, though they may experience greater impairment from depression in their daily life, according to a study published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Caregiver Closeness May Slow Alzheimer's Disease Progress

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with Alzheimer's disease who have a closer relationship with their caregiver -- especially when the caregiver is a spouse -- may have a slower progression of cognitive and functional symptoms, according to research published online June 29 in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences.

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Autism Linked to Some Gastrointestinal Symptoms

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Physically Active Children Fall Asleep Faster

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime physical activity is associated with faster sleep latency in children, and the more inactive children are, the harder it is for them to fall asleep at the end of the day, according to a study published online July 24 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

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Abstract - Dolan
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Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Emergency Clinicians Need Training to Treat Blast Injuries

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- With the increasing incidence of terrorist attacks worldwide, civilian emergency clinicians need training on managing the unique injuries that occur in explosions, according to a paper published online July 23 in the The Lancet.

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Children's Behavior May Improve After Adenotonsillectomy

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children who undergo adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing, improvements in sleep and behavior occur but may not be exactly maintained over time or reach baseline levels, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Vitamin D Supplements May Cut Depression Symptoms

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treating women with seasonal depression using a vitamin D supplement can reduce depressive symptoms, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Depression, Insomnia Affect Many Prostate Cancer Patients

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many men with prostate cancer suffer from insomnia, depression and distress, and younger men as well as those receiving radiation therapy are most at risk, according to a study published the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Teen Exposure to Tobacco-Related Content on Web Analyzed

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who surf the Internet are exposed to a very small volume of tobacco-related content, and not all of the exposure is pro-tobacco, according to a study published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity Rates Highest Among African-American Population

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity is far higher among African-Americans than Caucasians in America, and Hispanics also have significantly higher obesity rates, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Physical Activity May Improve Post-Stroke Function

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Some evidence suggests that getting more physical activity before a stroke may be linked to better functional status afterward, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Inflammation Affects Alzheimer's Protein Transport

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation and a transport protein at the blood-brain barrier affect the passage of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease across the blood-brain barrier, according to a study in the May issue of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity and a study in the third 2009 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Apolipoprotein E Genotype Disclosure May Not Be Harmful

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In the adult children of patients with Alzheimer's disease, the disclosure of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype does not appear to increase short-term psychological distress even in those who are APOE ε4-positive. But positive status may be associated with a premature decline in memory, according to two studies published in the July 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Green
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Abstract - Caselli
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Severe Pulmonary Disease Can Harm Cognitive Functioning

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause a deterioration of cognitive function in older adults over time, according to a study reported in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Peer Support Buffers Teen Depression After Terror Attack

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Social support from friends can help buffer depression among adolescents in the aftermath of a terrorist attack, according to a study published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Antipsychotic Drugs and Mortality Link Explored

MONDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Second-generation schizophrenia drugs are highly heterogeneous in terms of their impact of mortality rates for schizophrenia patients, and given its substantially lower mortality rate, restrictions on the drug clozapine should be reassessed, according to a study published online July 13 in The Lancet.

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Polygenic Component Linked to Risk of Schizophrenia

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Common polygenic variation may be responsible for a considerable portion of the total genetic variation involved in schizophrenia risk, according to research published online July 1 in Nature.

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Obesity Rates for American Adults Still Going Up

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- At least 25 percent of the adult population in 32 states is now obese, and national prevalence of obesity has risen from 25.6 percent in 2007 to 26.1 percent in 2008, according to a July 8 report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Government Program Did Not Cut Teen Pregnancies

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- England's Young People's Development Programme, modeled on the successful U.S. Children's Aid Society's Carrera program and aimed at delaying heterosexual experience, reducing teen pregnancies, cannabis use and drunkenness, did not work and may have increased teen pregnancies, according to a study published online July 7 in BMJ.

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More Suicides and Homicides With Rising Unemployment

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rises in the level of unemployment are associated with rises in the number of suicides and homicides, but a reduction in the number of road traffic accident-related deaths, according to a study published online July 8 in The Lancet.

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Teen Smoking Reduced Among Team Sports Participants

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Seeing smokers on the silver screen increases the risk of an adolescent becoming a smoker, but participation in team sports reduces that risk, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Stepped-Dose Efavirenz May Minimize Side Effects

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-positive patients, step-wise administration of efavirenz may reduce neuropsychiatric adverse events and prove just as effective as full-dose administration, according to a study published online July 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Internet Has Potential to Change Behavior

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based intervention is an effective tool to treat insomnia, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a study in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that Web-based games may be useful to help low-income African-American children make healthy snack food choices.

Abstract - Ritterband
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Drug Shows Promise for Hair-Pulling Disorder

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The amino acid N-acetylcysteine is effective in treating trichotillomania, the disorder characterized by repetitive hair pulling leading to hair loss, and may be helpful in treating other compulsive disorders, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Husband Migration Affects Mexican Wives' Mental Health

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Among wives in rural Mexico, mental health is poorer among those whose husbands migrate to the United States than among those whose husbands stay with the family, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Care for Women International.

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Health Woes of Indigenous People Spur Call to Action

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The world's 400 million indigenous people are dramatically more likely than non-indigenous people to suffer from chronic disease and premature mortality, and national and international efforts are needed to correct these disparities, according to two related review articles published July 4 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Gracey
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Mood Appears to Affect Brain's Processing of Pain

FRIDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' emotional state may affect the way they process painful stimuli, even when it appears to have no impact on subjective responses to pain, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Single Status at Middle-Age May Affect Alzheimer's Risk

FRIDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged people who are widowed or divorced are more likely than their cohabiting counterparts to have cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in later life, according to a study published online on July 2 in BMJ.

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Adolescent Intelligence Link to Adult Mortality Negotiable

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- The association between IQ in adolescence and mortality in later life is almost entirely attenuated by other risk factors, according to a study published online July 1 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Online Genetic Test Results Can Help Smokers Quit

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Whether genetic test results indicate relatives of lung cancer patients are at high or low risk for the disease, smokers' subsequent uptake of smoking cessation services is high, according to a study published online June 30 in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Priorities Set for Comparative Effectiveness Research

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The extent to which large-scale public investment in comparative effectiveness research can achieve its goals of better decision making and improved uptake of new knowledge depends on engaging the medical profession and patients, according to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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