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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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July 2009 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: August 03, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for July 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Blood Biochemical May Predict Severe Osteoarthritis

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The serum level of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), a biochemical thought to be associated with cartilage damage and inflammation in osteoarthritis, offers clinicians the first biochemical predictor of the development of severe osteoarthritis, according to a study in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Gender Outcomes in Kidney Transplants Examined

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo kidney transplant from a male donor have a 12 percent higher risk of graft failure than all other gender combinations, but at the 10-year point the risk is the same, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems Vary Widely

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic disease surveillance systems vary widely from state to state and the lack of homogeneity will raise the cost of data sharing, according to a study published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Health Data Network a Powerful Tool for Quality

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is on the verge of a new era in which distributed health data networks will assure local control of sensitive individual patient data, while providing medical researchers and policy makers access to powerful aggregate data on millions of patients, according to a pair of articles in the September 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Stroke Is a Rare but Serious Complication After PCI

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although fewer than 1 percent of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) develop a stroke, having a stroke greatly increases the likelihood of in-hospital death, according to a study in the August 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Long-Term Risk of Death After Radical Prostatectomy Low

THURSDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- A model developed to predict the 15-year risk of dying of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy shows that the risk is very low, particularly in more recent patients treated in the era of widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, according to a study published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Has Low Short-Term Risks

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery have a minimal short-term risk of death and other major adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Lung Reduction May Offer Better Life Quality Than Meds

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) preserves quality of life for patients with chronic emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease better than medical treatment, at least in the two years post-surgery, according to a study in the August 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Aggressive Approach to Cervix Abnormalities Questioned

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- The benefits of referring women for immediate colposcopy or aggressive treatment instead of cytological surveillance following detection of low-grade cervical abnormalities may not outweigh the risks of overtreatment, according to three related studies from the Trial Of Management of Borderline and Other Low-grade Abnormal smears (TOMBOLA) published online on July 28 in BMJ.

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Drug-Eluting Stent Numbers Show Large Decline

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- A large decline in the use of drug-eluting stents (DES)starting in late 2006 shows how rapidly scientific presentations can influence clinical treatment decisions, according to research published online July 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Developments Offer Hope to Ischemic Stroke Patients

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Current and emerging therapies for acute ischemic stroke have the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes, according to an article published in the inaugural July issue of the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

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Many Coronary Artery Disease Patients Not Referred to Rehab

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Just a little more than half of hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease are referred to cardiac rehabilitation at discharge, according to a study in the August 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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U.S. Faces Serious Upcoming Shortfall of Cardiac Surgeons

TUESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- By 2025, the United States will face a 25 percent shortage in the number of cardiothoracic surgeons needed to care for a growing and aging population, according to a study published online July 27 in Circulation.

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Novel Compound May Provide New Anesthetic Choice

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Methoxycarbonyl-etomidate (MOC-etomidate), a new compound derived from the anesthetic etomidate, is as fast-acting and provides the same hemodynamic stability as its parent drug, but does not cause dangerous adrenal gland suppression as etomidate can, according to a study in the August issue of Anesthesiology.

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Perioperative Transfusion May Not Affect Long-Term Survival

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving a moderate allogeneic blood transfusion in connection with coronary artery surgery is not associated with a reduction in long-term survival, according to a study in the August issue of Anesthesiology.

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Resection for Lung Cancer May Improve Survival Odds

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer, lung resection, preferably by lobectomy, should be considered in addition to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to a study published online July 27 in The Lancet.

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New Guidelines Address Quality of Systematic Reviews

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Updated guidelines have been developed to help authors improve the reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, according to an article published online July 21 in PLoS Medicine.

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Beta Blocker Link to Risk for Postoperative Stroke Analyzed

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- The chronic use of beta blockers prior to non-cardiac surgery is not associated with an increased incidence of postoperative stroke, according to a study in the August 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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New Method Decreased Wait Times at Urology Practice

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In urological practices, a streamlined scheduling system may improve access for new patients, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Operative Scoliosis Treatment Linked to Less Leg Pain

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical treatment of scoliosis in adults may lead to better improvement of leg pain than non-operative treatment, according to research published in the July 15 Spine.

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Methods to Determine Health Care Priorities Questioned

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating health care priorities based on the attitudes of patients (direct method) or the attitudes of the general public (indirect method) can produce different results, complicating decisions on the allocation of health care resources, according to two papers published July 22 in BMJ.

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Camera Phones Can Help Doctors Make Rare Diagnoses

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant patient with an uncommon nipple condition captured images of the transient changes to her nipples and gave them to her doctor, enabling an accurate diagnosis, according to an article published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Classification System Could Improve Low Back Pain Care

FRIDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although low back pain is a heterogeneous condition, recognizing patterns in symptoms can help to classify it and guide more effective treatment, according to a study in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Complications of Acute Otitis Media Becoming More Common

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with acute otitis media, the frequency of acute mastoiditis, as well as mastoid subperiosteal abscesses, is apparently increasing over time, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Drugs for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries Compared

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Both systemic heparin and antiplatelet agents are effective in treating blunt cerebrovascular injuries, according to a paper published in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Computerized Hospital Discharge Reassures Patients

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and their outpatient physicians are more satisfied with hospital discharge when the process involves computerized physician order entry rather than handwritten notes, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Lasers May Provide an Alternative to Liposuction

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In the first trial of its kind, Massachusetts researchers used a laser to destroy adipose tissue, a noninvasive approach that may someday provide an alternative to liposuction, according to a report in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Effects Uncertain in Immunocompromised

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Though roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population is immunocompromised for a variety of reasons, data on the efficacy of influenza vaccines in these individuals are scarce, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Phototherapy Can Help Heal Stubborn Diabetic Leg Ulcers

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Phototherapy can speed up the healing of diabetic leg ulcers that have not responded to other treatments, according to a report in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Blunt Needles May Cause Less Surgical Glove Perforations

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The use of blunt needles may be associated with fewer glove perforations during closure following Caesarean delivery, but with lower physician satisfaction with the needles, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Female Surgeons Happy With Career Choice

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most women surgeons are happy with their choice of career, but they also value maternity leave, at-work child care and the option of working part time, more than their male counterparts do, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Caesarean Deliveries Difficult to Code Into Diagnostic Groups

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The wide variation in coding practices for Caesarean delivery-related hospital admissions underscores difficulties in the coding and the personal judgments that coders need to make when assessing Caesareans, according to a study in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Larger Guide Catheters in PCI Linked to Complications

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The use of 7-F and 8-F guides for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a greater risk of a variety of complications compared with 6-F guides, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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More Lymph Node Checks May Not Help Cancer Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Retrieving a high number of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer patients does not help to identify more patients with stage III cases of the disease, a finding which undermines the case for retrieval of at least 12 lymph nodes as a benchmark quality measure of surgical treatment, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Ultrasound Can Help Diagnose Benign Skin Lesions

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound is a useful tool to diagnose benign subcutaneous lesions and could reduce the number of lesions referred to a hospital for treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Baseline Function Can Affect Change After Prostate Therapy

TUESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effect of prostate cancer treatments on men's sexual, bowel, and urinary function depends on patients' baseline levels of function, according to research published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Children's Behavior May Improve After Adenotonsillectomy

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children who undergo adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing, improvements in sleep and behavior occur but may not be exactly maintained over time or reach baseline levels, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Forceps-Associated Palsy Usually Mild, Temporary

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In neonates, facial nerve palsy caused by forceps use is usually mild and resolves without treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Obesity Not an Obstacle for Prostate Specific Antigen Test

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- A patient's weight does not significantly affect the usefulness of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing to determine prostate cancer, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Age of Undescended Testis Linked to Germ Cell Loss

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In children with cryptorchidism, the longer an affected testis remains undescended, the greater the risk of the loss of germ cells and Leydig cells, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Obesity Rates Highest Among African-American Population

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity is far higher among African-Americans than Caucasians in America, and Hispanics also have significantly higher obesity rates, according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Physical Activity May Improve Post-Stroke Function

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Some evidence suggests that getting more physical activity before a stroke may be linked to better functional status afterward, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Circumcision Does Not Cut Female Partners' HIV Risk

FRIDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Circumcision of HIV-infected men does not confer any additional protection on their female sexual partners, and condoms remain essential for prevention of HIV transmission, according to a study published in the July 18 issue of The Lancet.

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Low Ovarian Cancer Detection Rate by Symptoms Alone

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Using symptoms alone only identifies 20 percent of women with malignant tumors, but a negative result on the symptoms index combined with a negative ultrasound result is highly indicative of a benign mass, according to a study published online July 14 in Cancer.

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Drug Groups Causing Liver Transplantation Identified

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen, antiepileptics, antibiotics, and antituberculosis agents are the leading drug groups responsible for liver transplantation resulting from drug-induced acute liver failure (DIALF), according to research published in the July issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Peripheral and Marrow Grafts in Leukemia Compared

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients in remission with acute myelocytic leukemia, the risk of relapse is higher and the prospect of leukemia-free survival is lower for patients who undergo autologous stem cell transplantation from peripheral blood versus bone marrow, according to a study published online July 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cervical Procedure May Double Risk of Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo loop electrosurgical excision of the cervix, a procedure widely used for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, face a doubled risk of spontaneous singleton preterm delivery, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Endoscopic Harvesting Linked to Adverse Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo coronary-artery bypass grafting, endoscopic harvesting is associated with significantly poorer clinical outcomes, including mortality, than open harvesting, according to a study published in the July 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mechanics of First Near-Total Face Transplant Explained

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The procedure used for the composite face transplantation of an American citizen has been explained in a paper published online on July 15 in The Lancet.

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Repair of Patent Foramen Ovale May Not Be Beneficial

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a patent foramen ovale that is discovered and repaired during unrelated surgery may have a significantly increased risk of postoperative stroke, according to a study published in the July 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Genetic Alterations Linked to Malignant Gliomas

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The development and progression of malignant gliomas may be related to the interactions between a network of altered genes, and the responsible mechanism may be a deregulation of the annexin A7 (ANXA7) gene, according to two related studies published in the July 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Health-Related Quality of Life May Predict Cirrhosis Survival

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Health-related quality of life is a predictor of survival in cirrhosis patients who are in need of liver transplantation, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Adhesion Rate for Repeat Cesareans Analyzed

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Adhesions affect almost a quarter of all second-time cesarean sections, and the rate of adhesions increases with subsequent cesareans, slowing down time to each successive delivery, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Halo Treatment Effective in Cervical Spine Injury

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Treating traumatic cervical spine injuries with halo vest immobilization (HVI) is a reasonable option, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Proprioceptive Training Helps Prevent Repeat Ankle Sprains

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes who receive proprioceptive training after an ankle sprain are less likely to have a recurrent sprain than athletes who do not receive the training, according to a study published July 9 in BMJ.

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Study Finds a Third of Breast Cancers May Be Overdiagnosed

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- One in three breast cancers diagnosed in public mammography screenings is an overdiagnosed cancer that will never produce symptoms or lead to death, according to a meta-analysis by Danish researchers published July 9 in BMJ.

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Routine X-Rays After Lumbar Fusion May Not Be Useful

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Routine X-rays appear to have limited usefulness in the year after lumbar spinal fusion, according to research published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Barrett's Esophagus Surveillance Needs Improvement

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopist adherence to surveillance guidelines calling for extensive biopsies for people with Barrett's esophagus is poor, which results in reduced detection of dysplasia, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Mouse Study Suggests Rapamycin May Increase Longevity

FRIDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, significantly extends the lifespan of aged mice, according to a study published online July 8 in Nature.

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Researchers Fault Workload for Attending Physicians

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients face unnecessary risks from medical errors because of the practice of allowing attending physicians to work unlimited hours, according to an article published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity Rates for American Adults Still Going Up

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- At least 25 percent of the adult population in 32 states is now obese, and national prevalence of obesity has risen from 25.6 percent in 2007 to 26.1 percent in 2008, according to a July 8 report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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More Complications After Joint Replacement With Diabetes

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with uncontrolled diabetes are at higher risk of complications and mortality after knee or hip total joint arthroplasty than patients with controlled diabetes, according to research published in the July 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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One-Fifth of Patients Aged 60 to 69 Have Spinal Stenosis

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) increases with age, and almost one-fifth of patients aged 60 to 69 years have absolute stenosis, putting them at greater risk for lower back pain, according to a study published in the July issue of The Spine Journal.

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MRI May Offer Superior Accuracy in Evaluating Endometriosis

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging provides superior accuracy for the preoperative assessment of endometriosis, according to research published online July 7 in Radiology.

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Bevacizumab May Improve Hearing in Neurofibromatosis

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with bevacizumab may improve hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2, and it may also be associated with a reduction in growing vestibular schwannoma volume, according to a study published online July 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Inflammation Is Linked to Corneal Transplant Rejection

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- For patients receiving a corneal transplant for herpes simplex virus keratitis, signs of inflammation in excised corneal tissue detected in a histopathologic examination indicate increased risk for allograft rejection, according to a study in the July issue of Ophthalmology.

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Non-Sudden Death Measured in Childhood Cardiomyopathy

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The need to identify risk factors for non-sudden cardiac death in children with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is at least as important as finding risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to research published in the July 14 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sciatica Outcomes Not Better After Tubular Diskectomy

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with sciatica, minimally invasive treatment with tubular diskectomy does not significantly improve functional disability compared to conventional microdiskectomy, and may be associated with poorer outcomes, according to a study in the July 8 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Requires Stronger Label Warnings About Propoxyphene

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken steps to help prevent overdose in patients taking pain medications that contain the opioid propoxyphene, including Darvon and Darvocet, according to a July 7 release issued by the agency.

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Protein in Non-Metastatic Tumors May Inhibit Metastasis

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Prosaposin, a protein secreted by non-metastatic tumors, inhibits metastasis by producing factors that inhibit angiogenesis, and may be a potential cancer treatment, according to a study published online July 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Advances in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Seen

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although major advances have been made in the surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament tears, the optimal technique has yet to be identified, according to a review article published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Survival Is Improving

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- During the past 20 years, long-term survival has improved for Swedish patients undergoing intact abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and remained stable for those undergoing ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, despite increases in patient age and comorbidities, according to a study published online July 6 in Circulation.

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Aortic Dilations Often Missed on Electronic Medical Records

TUESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dilations picked up on computed tomography (CT) scans are often not recorded by clinicians in the patient's electronic medical record, according to a study published in the July 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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No Superior Treatment for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute basilar artery occlusion, intra-arterial therapy (IAT) is not unequivocally superior to primary intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), according to a study published online July 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Thromboprophylaxis Need Assessed in Spine Surgery

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- In spinal trauma with or without spinal cord injury, spine surgeons agree that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is necessary for selected groups of patients, according to a study published in the July issue of The Spine Journal.

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Prostate Condition Symptoms Linked to Ejaculation Problems

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Urologists treating patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which suggest benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), should counsel patients on the increased risk that LUTS/BPH and BPH treatment present for ejaculatory dysfunction, according to a literature review published in the July issue of Urology.

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Cartilage Transplantation Evolving for Ankle Repair

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Ankle repair techniques have improved as a result of the adaptation of knee repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation, according to an article published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Health Woes of Indigenous People Spur Call to Action

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The world's 400 million indigenous people are dramatically more likely than non-indigenous people to suffer from chronic disease and premature mortality, and national and international efforts are needed to correct these disparities, according to two related review articles published July 4 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Gracey
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Abstract - King
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Walking Aids Linked to Fall Injuries in Elderly

FRIDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Each year, more than 47,000 elderly patients go to the emergency department after being injured in falls associated with walkers and canes, according to a study published online June 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Atorvastatin Pretreatment Linked to Better PCI Outcomes

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- For patients on statin therapy, a high-dose atorvastatin reload before percutaneous coronary intervention was associated with a lower risk of major adverse cardiac events in the following 30 days, according to research published online July 1 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Mayo Clinic Streamlines Protocol Development

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- At the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, a project using focused process engineering has significantly accelerated the development and approval of clinical trials, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Bone Loss Process Not Clear in Hypercalciuria, Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Bone loss in patients with hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis results from a poorly understood breakdown of the body's mineral metabolism involving the kidneys, the intestines and the bones themselves, according to a literature review reported in the July issue of Urology.

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Spine Surgeons Faulted in Elderly Screenings

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients, many spine surgeons may be unwilling to perform routine osteoporosis or osteomalacia workups despite the high incidence of these conditions in this population, according to a study published in the July issue of The Spine Journal.

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Preoperative Staging May Reduce Lung Cancer Surgeries

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-small cell lung cancer, preoperative staging with combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) is associated with reductions in total and futile thoracotomies and has no effect on overall mortality, according to a study published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ketamine Appears Safe for Intubation in Critical Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ketamine is safe for use in endotracheal intubation for critically ill patients -- particularly those with sepsis -- compared to etomidate, according to research published online July 1 in The Lancet.

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Needle Treatment May Help Calcific Shoulder Tendonitis

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Percutaneous ultrasound-guided treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendonitis may provide rapid improvement of shoulder function and relief of pain, according to research published in the July issue of Radiology.

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Overweight Patients Require Increased Radiation Dose

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- During diagnostic radiologic procedures, overweight and obese patients require radiation doses that are several times greater than those needed by lean patients. With careful management, however, the effective doses may be reduced, according to a study published in the July issue of Radiology.

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Priorities Set for Comparative Effectiveness Research

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The extent to which large-scale public investment in comparative effectiveness research can achieve its goals of better decision making and improved uptake of new knowledge depends on engaging the medical profession and patients, according to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Triple Antithrombotic Therapy Becoming Growing Concern

WEDNESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Given that the number of patients requiring warfarin and dual antiplatelet therapy is expected to rise, clinicians should give thought to the best use of these therapies to balance their benefits and risks, according to a review published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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