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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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August 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: September 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for August 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Markers Can Predict More Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Blood flow is impaired and metabolism is enhanced in pancreatic tumors, and a high ratio of metabolism to blood flow predicts poor survival, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Skeletons Shed Light on Cervical Arthrosis Prevalence

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Cervical facet arthrosis appears more common with age and it may more often affect upper cervical levels, according to research on human skeletons published in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Children Should Get Priority in Pandemic Flu Fight

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The higher vulnerability of children to the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A (H1N1) means that preventive and immunization efforts should be targeted at children and young adults, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pluripotent Stem Cells Aid in Exploring Retinal Development

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) may generate retina-specific cell types along a similar time schedule as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which may point to therapies for retinal degenerative diseases, according to research published Aug. 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Drug Linked to Worse Outcome in Sclerosing Cholangitis

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The use of high-dose ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is associated with worse clinical outcomes compared to placebo, according to research published in the September issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
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Narcotics Linked to Patient Satisfaction for Low Back Pain

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain are more likely to be satisfied with their provider if they receive narcotics, and more likely to seek another provider if they lack insurance, according to a study in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Liver Fat, Not Visceral Fat, Linked to Obesity

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of intrahepatic fat correlate better with metabolic changes associated with obesity than visceral fat, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Childhood Immunization Levels Remain Stable and High

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates for America's 19- to 35-month-olds remain stable and high, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Testosterone Linked to Improvements in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone supplementation may improve functional capacity, muscle strength, and glucose metabolism in older men with chronic heart failure, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Restenosis More Common After Angioplasty Than Surgery

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although patients treated for carotid artery stenosis with endovascular treatment are significantly more likely to have restenosis than those treated with carotid endarterectomy, stroke risk for both groups is low, according to two papers from the Carotid And Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty Study published online Aug. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Ederle
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Abstract - Bonati
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Hormonal Signals Seen to Play Role in Ovarian Clock

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Ovulation may be partly dependent on an ovarian circadian clock that is affected by hormonal signals from the pituitary, according to animal research published in the September issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
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H1N1 Surveillance Approaches in U.K. Found Complementary

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- During the 2009 swine flu outbreak in the United Kingdom, infection surveillance reports based on patient self-reported flu symptoms closely matched, and were complementary to, surveillance reports based on the Health Protection Agency (HPA) protocol of testing at-risk individuals, according to a study published Aug. 27 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Psyllium Fiber Beats Out Bran in Irritable Bowel Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary supplementation with soluble psyllium fiber relieves irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) better than the standard dietary recommendation of insoluble bran fiber, according to a study published Aug. 27 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Hopeless Outlook Linked With Atherosclerosis in Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who show signs of hopelessness are more likely to have subclinical atherosclerosis compared to their more optimistic counterparts, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Stroke, while a second study found that the extent of apathy a stroke patient feels has an important impact on stroke outcomes.

Abstract - Whipple
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Abstract - Mayo
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Low-Carb, High-Protein Diet Linked to Atherosclerosis

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Mice on a low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) diet had more aortic atherosclerosis than mice on a typical "Western" diet, despite less weight gain and similar blood lipids, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Mechanism of Neuroblastoma Differentiation Identified

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induces the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells by inducing growth arrest, affecting the epithelium to mesenchyme transition and suppressing a key regulator, according to a study in the September issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
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Saliva Contains Markers Useful for Cancer Detection

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Saliva contains many stable microRNAs (miRNAs), and two of these are present at much lower levels in patients with oral cancer, and could be used for cancer detection, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Peripheral Arterial Disease Linked to Recurrence of Stroke

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease after a stroke or transient ischemic attack are more likely to have another stroke or vascular event, according to a study published online on Aug. 27 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Muscle Changes Can Explain How Exercise Prevents Obesity

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate daily exercise prevents obesity in rats born to undernourished mothers by activating pathways in skeletal muscle that enhance metabolic flexibility, according to a study in the September issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
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One in Seven Readmitted After Revascularization

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Readmission after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) occurs in 14.6 percent of cases, and rehospitalization within 30 days of undergoing the procedure is associated with higher odds of mortality, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Strong Thighs Affect Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although thigh strength does not seem to affect the likelihood of developing knee osteoarthritis, it may predict the likelihood of patients detecting symptoms of the condition, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Roflumilast Proven Effective in Chronic Pulmonary Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In high-risk patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), treatment with the oral anti-inflammatory drug roflumilast -- a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor -- may improve lung function and reduce the risk of exacerbations, according to two studies published in the Aug. 29 special issue of The Lancet focusing on COPD.

Abstract - Calverley
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Abstract - Fabbri
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Budesonide May Not Increase Pneumonia Risk in COPD

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide is not associated with an increased risk of pneumonia, according to a study contradicting previous research findings in the Aug. 29 special issue of The Lancet focusing on COPD.

Abstract
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Obesity's Effect on Anterior Spine Surgery Examined

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients undergoing anterior lumbar surgery may have similar complications and time to ambulation as non-obese patients, according to research published in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Study Shows How Low Vitamin D May Influence Heart Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In people with diabetes, vitamin D may inhibit foam cell creation by reducing acetylated or oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol uptake in macrophages, according to research published in the Aug. 25 issue of Circulation.

Abstract
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Cardiovascular Risks Linked to Dementia Hospitalization

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking, hypertension and diabetes in midlife are associated with hospitalization for dementia later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Parameters for Pedicle Screw Insertion Measured

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing preoperative thin-cut imaging for cervical pedicle screw insertion, linear and angular parameters show a fair amount of variability, according to a study in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Fulvestrant Shows Benefits in Advanced Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High-dose fulvestrant, an estrogen receptor antagonist, appears to be at least as effective as the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole as a first-line endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, according to research published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Human Papillomavirus May Be Linked to Penile Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially with HPV 16-18, may be associated with nearly half of the cases of penile carcinoma, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.

Abstract
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Middle School Program May Delay Sexual Activity

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In middle school students, "It's Your Game: Keeping It Real" -- a theory-driven, multi-component, curriculum-based intervention -- may help delay the initiation of sexual activity, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
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Radiation Therapy Fatigue Linked to Cytokine Network

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who receive radiation treatment for early-stage breast or prostate cancer, the resulting fatigue may be associated with activation of the proinflammatory cytokine network, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Octreotide May Provide Benefits in Midgut Tumors

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Octreotide LAR might inhibit tumor growth in patients with metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors, according to research published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Stent-Assisted Embolization Feasible for Aneurysms

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acutely ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms that are otherwise difficult to treat, stent-assisted coil embolization may be an effective strategy, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Radiology.

Abstract
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Muscle Pressure and Oxygen Not Linked in Back Muscles

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Intramuscular pressure generally does not correlate with oxygen saturation in the multifidus muscle of healthy young men in various postures, according to a study in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Excess Weight Associated With Adult-Onset Asthma

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In adult women, overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity, regardless of body mass index, are independently associated with adult-onset asthma, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Thorax.

Abstract
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New Sensitive Troponin Assays May Identify Heart Attacks

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In patients presenting with signs and symptoms of heart attack, new sensitive cardiac troponin assays may significantly improve the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, according to two studies published in the Aug. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Reichlin
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Abstract - Keller
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Annual Radiation Exposure Often High in Younger Adults

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In young and middle-aged adults, imaging procedures are a significant source of exposure to ionizing radiation and in some cases can lead to high and very high cumulative effective doses, according to a study published in the Aug. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Perspective (subscription or payment may be required)

New Target Eyed for Colorectal Cancer Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs targeting the pseudo-kinase ERBB3 -- which is closely related to the epidermal growth factor receptor that has been investigated as a target for treatment of colorectal cancer -- might be more effective in treating colorectal cancer, according to research published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Abstract
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Magnetic Resonance Imagining Can Monitor Carotid Narrowing

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- High-spatial-resolution, 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging of the carotid artery can monitor plaque build-up in atherosclerotic disease, a progression slowed by statin therapy, according to a study in the September issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Carvedilol May Be Useful Against Variceal Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Carvedilol, a beta blocker, may be useful in preventing variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis, according to research published in the September issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
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Marital Discord May Reduce Long-Term Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors who are going through marital separation at the time of their diagnosis have the lowest long-term relative survival rates compared to their married and unmarried peers, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Violence and Injuries Plague South Africa

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In South Africa, violence and injuries are the second-leading cause of death and lost disability-adjusted life years, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

Abstract
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Hormone Replacement May Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduce their risk of developing colorectal cancer by more than half, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Ovarian Cancer Is Not Always a 'Silent Killer'

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that ovarian cancer is dubbed the "silent killer," patients usually have symptoms that are noticeable, sometimes months before their diagnosis, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Commentary
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Many Health Care Workers Skeptical About Swine Flu Jab

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of health care workers in Hong Kong has found that less than half would accept the offer of vaccination against influenza A H1N1 of swine origin, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Scant Evidence to Support Cash for Social Change

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- There is little evidence that child development grants tied to uptake of services aimed at improving social mobility currently undergoing pilot studies in the United Kingdom are workable, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Drug-Resistant Bacteria Strains on the Rise in the U.S.

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increasingly, Salmonella ser Typhi bacteria strains isolated from typhoid fever cases in the U.S. are resistant to the standard antibiotics, and most of these drug-resistant cases appear to be contracted by U.S. citizens visiting India, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in the Aug. 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Gender Affects Mortality After Acute Coronary Syndromes

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women have different short-term death rates than men following acute coronary syndromes (ACS) depending on clinical presentation, although this appears to be largely due to differences in angiographic disease severity, according to a study in the Aug. 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Department Issues New HIPAA Notification Regulations

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new regulations on Aug. 19 requiring entities covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to notify individuals after their health information has been breached.

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Germline Variants Linked to Risk of Childhood Leukemia

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Inherited genetic variants appear to play a role both in the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the development of specific types of the disease, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Nature Genetics.

Abstract
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Ultrasonography Helps Predict Metastases Post Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasonography of the lymph nodes can detect disease recurrence and help predict the development of distant metastases in women who have had surgery for breast cancer, according to a study in the September issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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FDA Reviewing Adverse Events in Patients on Orlistat

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a review of reports of liver injury in patients taking the weight loss drug orlistat, according to an Aug. 24 news release issued by the agency.

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Medication Reviews Can Keep Hospitalization Rates Down

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Collaborative medicine reviews for patients treated with heart failure medicines are effective in delaying the time to next hospitalization for heart failure, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Abstract
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Cable Ads for Alcohol Linked to Age 12 to 20 Viewership

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In most cable advertising time slots, increases in adolescent viewership are associated with more ads for beer and other types of alcohol, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
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AHA Recommends Limiting Added Dietary Sugars

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' average daily intake of added sugars significantly exceeds discretionary calorie allowances, regardless of energy needs, and should be reduced by up to three-quarters, according to an American Heart Association Scientific Statement published online Aug. 24 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Smokers' Vehicles Contain High Nicotine Concentrations

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Motor vehicles operated by smokers have higher concentrations of nicotine than those found even in restaurants and bars, according to a pilot study published online Aug. 24 in Tobacco Control.

Abstract
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Car Seat Confinement Reduces Oxygen in Newborns' Blood

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A young infant's blood oxygen saturation level is lower when he or she is placed in a car seat or car bed compared to lying in a crib, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Non-Infectious Disease in South Africa Growing Burden

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- South Africa is struggling under the quadruple burden of communicable disease, non-communicable disease, perinatal and maternal ill-health, and disorders arising from injury in both urban and rural settings, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

Abstract
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Children Exposed to Lead Via Contamination of Family Car

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Six children were diagnosed with lead poisoning after having been exposed to the metal via their family vehicles, according to a report published in the Aug. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Findings Spotlight Maternal Role in Prenatal Transplants

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Following prenatal cell transplantation, the mother's immune response may hinder the offspring's tolerance of the cells, according to animal research published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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'Housekeeping' Gene Important for Neurogenesis

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Deficiency of the gene responsible for a rare neurological disease, that was thought to be merely important in metabolism, leads to abnormal development of dopaminergic neurons and may explain some of the pathology of the disease, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in Molecular Therapy.

Abstract
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Report Addresses Depression Management in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of depression during pregnancy, psychotherapy alone may be appropriate for some women. However, other women may prefer pharmacotherapy or require pharmacological treatment, according to a report published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Current Smoking Linked to Active Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In Taiwan, smokers have a doubled risk of tuberculosis compared to non-smokers, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Panel Relaxes Restrictions on Liquids During Labor

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women in normal labor can safely drink modest amounts of clear liquids, and those undergoing cesarean delivery can do so for up to two hours before they are given anesthesia, according to a new opinion released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Obstetric Practice and published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Caring for Diabetes Patients Often a Struggle

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Many caregivers of diabetic patients struggle with dietary and exercise guideline compliance and find the medical management of the condition difficult, according to a study by The Hormone Foundation in collaboration with the National Alliance for Caregiving.

Press Release
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Alcohol Use Common Among Georgia High School Students

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Over a third of Georgia high school students are current users of alcohol, according to a report published in the Aug. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Hospital Factors Affect Cancer Outcome in African-Americans

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Racial disparities in breast and colon cancer outcomes are strongly associated with hospital factors such as quality, according to a report published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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30-Minute Electroacupuncture Application Found Optimal

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Electroacupuncture stimulation, which applies a small electrical current to needles inserted into the acupuncture points, relieves pain best when applied for 30 minutes, according to a study in the September issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Dopamine Important for Creating Persistent Memories

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The brain's dopamine system in the hippocampus is responsible for creating persistent long-term memory (LTM) in rats, according to a study in the Aug. 21 issue of Science.

Abstract
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Postoperative Radiation May Be Beneficial in Vulvar Cancer

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with groin node-positive vulvar cancer who have undergone radical vulvectomy and inguinal lymphadenectomy, postoperative radiation is associated with a significantly lower rate of cancer-related death than postoperative pelvic node resection, according to a study in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Spinal Stenosis Surgery Can Improve Bone Metabolism

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with lumbar spinal stenosis have improvements in bone metabolism after decompression surgery, regardless of whether they receive bisphosphonates, according to a study in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Cost-Effectiveness of Lynch Syndrome Screenings Studied

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer, immunohistochemistry followed by single gene sequencing may be the most cost-effective screening strategy for Lynch syndrome, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Sleep-Disordered Breathing May Raise Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-disordered breathing may be associated with higher all-cause and cardiovascular-related mortality in middle-aged and older people, particularly men, according to research published online Aug. 18 in PLoS Medicine.

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Wearable Artificial Kidney Device Shows Progress

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The prototype design for a "wearable artificial kidney" (WAK) matched the performance of larger dialysis units and may offer a new modality for daily dialysis in end stage renal disease, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Pediatric Kidney Donor Age No Barrier to Success Rate

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant patients have similar outcomes whether the donor is above or below the age of 5 years, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Nerve Fiber Density May Diagnose Endometriosis

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nerve fiber density is higher in endometrial biopsies from women with endometriosis and could be used as a diagnostic test, according to two studies published online Aug. 18 in Human Reproduction.

Abstract - Bokor
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Abstract - Al-Jefout
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New Cement Shows Promise for Use in Vertebroplasty

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A new bone substitute material may offer advantages when used in vertebroplasty compared to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), according to research from an animal study published in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Breast-Feeding May Lower Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers with multiple sclerosis (MS) who breast-feed exclusively may have a lower risk of postpartum MS relapses, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Health Care Financing Model Rewards Efficient Care

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A health care financing model that includes incentives for reducing potentially avoidable costs can act as a bridge between the current fragmented system and one based on high-value care, according to an article published online Aug. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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FDA Issues Warnings on Unlawful Topical Ibuprofen

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warning letters to eight companies marketing over-the-counter topical products containing ibuprofen, noting that the drugs' claims have not been evaluated by the FDA, according to an Aug. 20 release issued by the agency.

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Violence and Mental Health in Young Afghans Studied

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Many Afghan children and teenagers have experienced a variety of types of trauma related to war and other sources that may influence their mental health, according to research published online Aug. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Adjuvant Chemotherapy Little Help for Urothelial Cancer

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated surgically for upper tract urothelial carcinoma are not usually offered adjuvant chemotherapy, and for those who are, the treatment does not seem to have much impact on the odds of survival, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Online Behavioral Therapy Found Effective in Depression

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In a study in the United Kingdom, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions conducted online with a therapist reduced depression better than usual in-person care with a general practitioner, according to a study in the Aug. 22 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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CDC Issues Guidance for Swine Flu on College Campuses

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued guidance for colleges and universities to plan for and respond to the upcoming flu season.

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Flu Vaccination for Children and Parents Most Important

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Schoolchildren and their parents should receive priority for flu vaccines (both seasonal and swine flu) because they are primarily responsible for transmission, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in Science.

Abstract
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Most Melanomas Found Are Dermatologist Initiated

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Routine full-body skin checks by dermatologists detect more melanomas at an earlier stage than investigations as a result of patient complaints, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Prion Protein Eyed for Role in Pancreatic Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A form of prion protein (PrP) may play a role in the aggressiveness of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), according to research published Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Scleral Invasion Linked to Risk of Relapse in Retinoblastoma

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Microscopic scleral invasion is uncommon in patients with retinoblastoma, but these patients are at risk of extraocular relapse and have better outcomes if they receive high-intensity chemotherapy, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Healing Impaired in Leaking Blebs After Glaucoma Surgery

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- After filtration surgery for glaucoma, mitomycin C-treated filtering blebs with persistent leaks often display aberrant wound healing, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Technique Benefits Patients With Vocal Fold Polyps

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with vocal fold polyps, percutaneous corticosteroid injection is a minimally invasive and effective treatment that may offer an alternative to standard direct microlaryngoscopic surgery, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Seizures Uncommon in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Seizures appear uncommon in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but they may be more likely to occur in younger patients, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Sexual Minorities More Likely to Seek Mental Health Help

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbian and bisexual women and gay men are more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to seek treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, according to a study published Aug. 14 in BMC Psychiatry.

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Quality of Life in Scoliosis Improves After Surgery

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) generally improves after spinal fusion, particularly with greater reductions in deformity, according to a study in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

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Federal Guidelines Suggest Employers Plan for Swine Flu

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released a series of guidelines for employers to protect the health of their employees and their businesses' bottom lines in the event of an outbreak of H1N1 swine flu over the fall and winter.

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Gatorade Not Found to Affect Risk of Urinary Stones

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although consumption of the carbohydrate-electrolyte drink Gatorade increases mean urinary sodium and chloride levels, the increase is within normal parameters and has no clinical significance, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Adolescent Exercise Brings a Good Night's Sleep

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who exercise regularly sleep better and are less anxious and have fewer depressive symptoms than their non-exercising peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 by the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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U.S. Life Expectancy Reaches 77.9 Years

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy in the United States has increased again, from 77.7 to 77.9 years -- a new record -- according to statistics released Aug.19 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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