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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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August 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: September 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for August 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Children Should Get Priority in Pandemic Flu Fight

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The higher vulnerability of children to the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A (H1N1) means that preventive and immunization efforts should be targeted at children and young adults, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Childhood Immunization Levels Remain Stable and High

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates for America's 19- to 35-month-olds remain stable and high, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mechanism of Neuroblastoma Differentiation Identified

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induces the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells by inducing growth arrest, affecting the epithelium to mesenchyme transition and suppressing a key regulator, according to a study in the September issue of Endocrinology.

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Muscle Changes Can Explain How Exercise Prevents Obesity

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate daily exercise prevents obesity in rats born to undernourished mothers by activating pathways in skeletal muscle that enhance metabolic flexibility, according to a study in the September issue of Endocrinology.

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Middle School Program May Delay Sexual Activity

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In middle school students, "It's Your Game: Keeping It Real" -- a theory-driven, multi-component, curriculum-based intervention -- may help delay the initiation of sexual activity, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Radiation Therapy Fatigue Linked to Cytokine Network

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who receive radiation treatment for early-stage breast or prostate cancer, the resulting fatigue may be associated with activation of the proinflammatory cytokine network, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Infant Mortality in South Africa on the Rise

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty and the epidemic of HIV/AIDS, as well as sub-optimal implementation of high-impact interventions are behind South Africa's failure to improve its child mortality rates, which have risen since 1990, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

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Violence and Injuries Plague South Africa

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In South Africa, violence and injuries are the second-leading cause of death and lost disability-adjusted life years, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

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Many Health Care Workers Skeptical About Swine Flu Jab

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of health care workers in Hong Kong has found that less than half would accept the offer of vaccination against influenza A H1N1 of swine origin, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

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Scant Evidence to Support Cash for Social Change

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- There is little evidence that child development grants tied to uptake of services aimed at improving social mobility currently undergoing pilot studies in the United Kingdom are workable, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

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Department Issues New HIPAA Notification Regulations

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new regulations on Aug. 19 requiring entities covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to notify individuals after their health information has been breached.

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Germline Variants Linked to Risk of Childhood Leukemia

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Inherited genetic variants appear to play a role both in the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the development of specific types of the disease, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Nature Genetics.

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Cable Ads for Alcohol Linked to Age 12 to 20 Viewership

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In most cable advertising time slots, increases in adolescent viewership are associated with more ads for beer and other types of alcohol, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Smokers' Vehicles Contain High Nicotine Concentrations

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Motor vehicles operated by smokers have higher concentrations of nicotine than those found even in restaurants and bars, according to a pilot study published online Aug. 24 in Tobacco Control.

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Car Seat Confinement Reduces Oxygen in Newborns' Blood

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A young infant's blood oxygen saturation level is lower when he or she is placed in a car seat or car bed compared to lying in a crib, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Children Exposed to Lead Via Contamination of Family Car

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Six children were diagnosed with lead poisoning after having been exposed to the metal via their family vehicles, according to a report published in the Aug. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Findings Spotlight Maternal Role in Prenatal Transplants

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Following prenatal cell transplantation, the mother's immune response may hinder the offspring's tolerance of the cells, according to animal research published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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'Housekeeping' Gene Important for Neurogenesis

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Deficiency of the gene responsible for a rare neurological disease, that was thought to be merely important in metabolism, leads to abnormal development of dopaminergic neurons and may explain some of the pathology of the disease, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in Molecular Therapy.

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Report Addresses Depression Management in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of depression during pregnancy, psychotherapy alone may be appropriate for some women. However, other women may prefer pharmacotherapy or require pharmacological treatment, according to a report published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Alcohol Use Common Among Georgia High School Students

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Over a third of Georgia high school students are current users of alcohol, according to a report published in the Aug. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pediatric Kidney Donor Age No Barrier to Success Rate

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant patients have similar outcomes whether the donor is above or below the age of 5 years, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Health Care Financing Model Rewards Efficient Care

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A health care financing model that includes incentives for reducing potentially avoidable costs can act as a bridge between the current fragmented system and one based on high-value care, according to an article published online Aug. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Violence and Mental Health in Young Afghans Studied

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Many Afghan children and teenagers have experienced a variety of types of trauma related to war and other sources that may influence their mental health, according to research published online Aug. 21 in The Lancet.

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Flu Vaccination for Children and Parents Most Important

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Schoolchildren and their parents should receive priority for flu vaccines (both seasonal and swine flu) because they are primarily responsible for transmission, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in Science.

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Scleral Invasion Linked to Risk of Relapse in Retinoblastoma

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Microscopic scleral invasion is uncommon in patients with retinoblastoma, but these patients are at risk of extraocular relapse and have better outcomes if they receive high-intensity chemotherapy, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Quality of Life in Scoliosis Improves After Surgery

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) generally improves after spinal fusion, particularly with greater reductions in deformity, according to a study in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

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Adolescent Exercise Brings a Good Night's Sleep

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who exercise regularly sleep better and are less anxious and have fewer depressive symptoms than their non-exercising peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 by the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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U.S. Life Expectancy Reaches 77.9 Years

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy in the United States has increased again, from 77.7 to 77.9 years -- a new record -- according to statistics released Aug.19 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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FDA Launches New Center for Tobacco Products

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the launch of its Center for Tobacco Products, an agency armed with the mission of developing and implementing public health strategies to reduce the burden of illnesses and deaths caused by tobacco products nationwide.

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Study Compares Acetaminophen With Codeine to Ibuprofen

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Ibuprofen appears to be preferable to acetaminophen with codeine in treating children with uncomplicated arm fractures, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Pandemic Flu Vaccines Should Be Fairly Distributed

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Ensuring equitable access around the world to pandemic flu vaccines will require a concerted effort by the global community to ensure that developing, as well as developed, countries get the vaccines that they need, according to an article published online Aug. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Adverse Events Analyzed for Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most adverse events from the human papillomavirus vaccine do not exceed background rates for other vaccines, but syncope and venous thromboembolic events were disproportionately reported, according to a study in the Aug. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antibiotic Use for Respiratory Infections Decreasing

TUESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) is on the decrease, driven down by a drop in the number of office visits by young children with otitis media, according to a study in the Aug. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Magazines Often Depict Infants in Unsafe Sleep Positions

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Magazines widely read by women of childbearing age frequently depict infants sleeping in unsafe positions or environments that do not meet American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines and may place them at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Short Children Found to Be as Well-Adjusted as Peers

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Except for a marginal increase in peer victimization, children who are short in stature do not seem to have any added emotional or behavioral problems compared to non-short peers, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Adolescents Still Need Developmentally-Based Care

MONDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Providing developmentally-based care to school-aged and adolescent perioperative patients is vital for easing stress and fears associated with the surgical experience, according to a paper published in the August issue of the AORN Journal.

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Difference Between Near Miss, Wrong-Site Surgery Studied

MONDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- There are important differences between errors that are caught as near misses and those that progress to wrong-site surgery, and health care professionals can follow simple steps to reduce or eliminate wrong-site surgery, according to a study in the August issue of the AORN Journal.

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Use of Mental Health Help Low for Young Adults in Need

MONDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although young adults suspected of being maltreated during adolescence have a high prevalence of mental health problems, only a small proportion use outpatient mental health services, according to research published in the August issue of Psychiatric Services.

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Alarm Symptoms Often Do Not Result in Timely Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who present with certain alarm symptoms, including hematuria and rectal bleeding, do not receive a diagnosis in a reasonable amount of time, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in BMJ.

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Childhood Cancer Survivorship Linked to Diabetes Mellitus

FRIDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In young adulthood, childhood cancer survivors have an almost doubled risk of diabetes compared to their siblings, and the risk is especially high among those who received either total body or abdominal irradiation, according to a study published in the Aug. 10/24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Discharge Summaries Often Lack Pending Test Results

THURSDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital discharge summaries often do not contain information on pending test results or provider follow-up information, which can lead to medical errors, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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First Epileptic Seizure Linked to Cognitive Deficits

THURSDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Intellectually normal children with a first recognized epileptic seizure are significantly more likely than their healthy siblings to exhibit neuropsychological deficits, which suggests there is a window of opportunity for treatment that could reduce subsequent effects on academic performance, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in Neurology.

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Low Self-Control Can Lead to Girls Becoming Overweight

THURSDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Girls who have low inhibitory self-control are more apt to become overweight, especially if their parents try to restrict their eating habits, according to a study in the August Journal of Pediatrics.

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FDA Aims to Ease Access to Investigational Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has published two new rules to help seriously ill patients gain access to investigational drugs and biologics, according to an Aug. 12 release issued by the agency.

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Many Adolescents Share Prescription Medication

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- One-fifth of U.S. adolescents report sharing prescription medication, and efforts to reduce this practice may be justified, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Mindful Eating Linked to Yoga, Lower Body Mass Index

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A mindful eating questionnaire (MEQ) is a useful and valid measurement of mindful eating, considered nonjudgmental awareness of physical and emotional sensations associated with eating, and is associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and yoga, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Stillbirth, Neonatal Deaths Falling in Scotland

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of death attributed to intrapartum anoxia in term infants fell in recent decades in Scotland, according to research published in the Aug. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Most College Students Categorized as Poor Sleepers

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Inconsistent sleep-wake patterns and insufficient sleep occur at alarming rates among college students, leading to various physical and psychological health problems, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Growth Hormone Shown to Be Beneficial in Short Children

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In short children born small for gestational age, growth hormone therapy may help compensate for reductions in adult height, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Tool Can Significantly Reduce Pediatric Prescription Errors

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric intensive care units, computerized physician order entry and a clinical decision support system that limits doses by weight may significantly reduce rates of medical prescription errors and potential adverse drug events, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Distress May Be Pre-Existing Condition in Teenage Moms

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage mothers are more distressed than their childless peers, but their distress usually precedes their pregnancy and results from family, school, socioeconomic and other factors, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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Antivirals May Not Affect Children's Flu Complications

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) may have little or no effect on various complications in children with seasonal influenza, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in BMJ.

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Medication Overdoses in Children Create Large Burden

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Medication overdoses, particularly in preschoolers, account for a substantial portion of poisonings involving young people that are treated in emergency rooms, according to research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Propranolol Shows Rapid Effect on Infantile Hemangiomas

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Propranolol, a β-adrenergic receptor blocker, appears to have a rapid effect in treating complicated infantile hemangiomas, according to research published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Sudden Deaths in Young Lacrosse Players Appear Rare

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden death among young competitive lacrosse players appears rare, though commotio cordis may be a particular concern among these players, according to research published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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HHS Releases Reports on Health Insurance Reform

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released a series of state-by-state reports that outline its conclusions on the effects health insurance reform would have on health care for Americans, according to an Aug. 7 release issued by the agency.

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CDC Issues Guidance for Handling Influenza in Schools

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released guidelines to help state and local school and public health officials respond to 2009 H1N1 influenza in schools. The CDC and other federal agencies announced the guidelines at an Aug. 7 joint news conference.

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Corticosteroids May Reduce Sore Throat Pain

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with sore throat, systemic corticosteroids in combination with antibiotics and analgesia may significantly improve symptoms, mostly in those with severe or exudative sore throat, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in BMJ.

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Early Exercise May Reduce Body Fat in Later Childhood

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity at a moderate level or greater in young children may help protect them from fat accumulation later in childhood, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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High Hopes for Tuberculosis Drugs, Tools in Pipeline

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- New drug regimens, vaccines, and diagnostic tools currently in development for tuberculosis have the potential to radically change the incidence of the disease worldwide, according to findings published online Aug. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Screening Rationale May Be Affected by HPV Vaccination

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Early vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) can reduce the risk of cervical cancer by up to 70 percent, but screening should be initiated later and less often to reduce the risk of false positives, according to a review in the August issue of Gynecologic Oncology.

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Nurse Home Visit Can Benefit Children With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Children with problematic asthma can better manage their condition and avoid stronger medications with the help of a home visit by an asthma nurse who can identify conditions leading to exacerbations, according to a study published online June 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Deprivation, Ethnicity Major Predictors of Perinatal Death

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Infant and perinatal mortality are high in parts of England, and social deprivation, ethnicity and maternal age explain many of the differences in these mortality rates between primary care trusts, according to a study published Aug. 4 in BMJ.

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TV Time Linked to Blood Pressure in Young Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent in front of the television may be associated with higher blood pressure in young children, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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More Asthma Diagnoses After September 11 Attacks

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults exposed to the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center attacks developed asthma or post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Requiring Stronger Warnings for TNF Blockers

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now requiring that the prescribing information for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers contain stronger warnings, including an updated boxed warning, according to an Aug. 4 release issued by the agency.

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Editorial Opposes European Commission Proposals

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The United Kingdom should not accept new proposals from the European Commission that would allow drug companies to provide information about prescription-only drugs over the Internet and in some print publications, according to an editorial published in the August issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

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Course Could Improve Dating Health in High School Students

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A course on dating violence and healthy relationships may provide benefits for high school students, particularly boys, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Pain Relief Not Only Motive for Teenagers' Opioid Use

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of U.S. high school seniors report non-medical use of prescription opioids, and many of them are motivated by factors other than physical pain relief, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Extended-Duration Antiviral Chemoprophylaxis Feasible

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In healthy Caucasian and Japanese adults, administration of zanamivir or oseltamivir significantly reduces the risk of developing symptomatic influenza, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Simple Steps Can Prevent Household Spread of Influenza

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In households where a member has been infected with influenza, virus transmission is significantly less likely when all household members practice rigorous hand washing and wear surgical masks soon after the sick member develops influenza symptoms, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Accurate Clostridium difficile Diagnosis Seen as Critical

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Clostridium difficile infection is becoming increasingly widespread and virulent, making accurate diagnosis essential. But many clinicians are unsure how to best evaluate suspected cases, according to an article in the Aug. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Preschool Depression May Not Be a Transient Phenomenon

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In preschoolers, depression is not a transient syndrome but is a significant predictor of recurrent or chronic depression, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Inhibition of tPA May Reduce Brain Injury in Newborns

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Inhibiting tissue-type plasminogen activators could be useful in preventing brain injury in infants with oxygen or blood-flow deprivation, according to research published July 8 in the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Neonatal Urinary Tract Infection Prognosis Difficult

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Renal scintigraphy of young infants with urinary tract infections (UTIs) can help rule out permanent renal damage, but catheterization to perform voiding cystourethrography may still be required to detect congenital defects such as dilating vesicoureteral reflux, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Physical Education Injuries Up 150 Percent Since 1997

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The number of injuries sustained by children and adolescents annually during physical education (PE) activities increased more than 150 percent during the years 1997 to 2007, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Cardiovascular Risks Higher for Youth With Low Vitamin D

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A low serum level of vitamin D is associated with increased cardiovascular risk among children and adolescents, according to two studies published online Aug. 3 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Kumar
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Abstract - Reis
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