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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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August 2009 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: September 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for August 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Narcotics Linked to Patient Satisfaction for Low Back Pain

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain are more likely to be satisfied with their provider if they receive narcotics, and more likely to seek another provider if they lack insurance, according to a study in the September issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Hopeless Outlook Linked With Atherosclerosis in Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who show signs of hopelessness are more likely to have subclinical atherosclerosis compared to their more optimistic counterparts, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Stroke, while a second study found that the extent of apathy a stroke patient feels has an important impact on stroke outcomes.

Abstract - Whipple
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Abstract - Mayo
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Cardiovascular Risks Linked to Dementia Hospitalization

THURSDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking, hypertension and diabetes in midlife are associated with hospitalization for dementia later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Marital Discord May Reduce Long-Term Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors who are going through marital separation at the time of their diagnosis have the lowest long-term relative survival rates compared to their married and unmarried peers, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Violence and Injuries Plague South Africa

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In South Africa, violence and injuries are the second-leading cause of death and lost disability-adjusted life years, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

Abstract
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Scant Evidence to Support Cash for Social Change

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- There is little evidence that child development grants tied to uptake of services aimed at improving social mobility currently undergoing pilot studies in the United Kingdom are workable, according to an article published online Aug. 25 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Department Issues New HIPAA Notification Regulations

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new regulations on Aug. 19 requiring entities covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to notify individuals after their health information has been breached.

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Cable Ads for Alcohol Linked to Age 12 to 20 Viewership

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In most cable advertising time slots, increases in adolescent viewership are associated with more ads for beer and other types of alcohol, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
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Non-Infectious Disease in South Africa Growing Burden

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- South Africa is struggling under the quadruple burden of communicable disease, non-communicable disease, perinatal and maternal ill-health, and disorders arising from injury in both urban and rural settings, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in a special edition of The Lancet focusing on health in South Africa.

Abstract
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Report Addresses Depression Management in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of depression during pregnancy, psychotherapy alone may be appropriate for some women. However, other women may prefer pharmacotherapy or require pharmacological treatment, according to a report published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Dopamine Important for Creating Persistent Memories

MONDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The brain's dopamine system in the hippocampus is responsible for creating persistent long-term memory (LTM) in rats, according to a study in the Aug. 21 issue of Science.

Abstract
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Violence and Mental Health in Young Afghans Studied

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Many Afghan children and teenagers have experienced a variety of types of trauma related to war and other sources that may influence their mental health, according to research published online Aug. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Comment

Online Behavioral Therapy Found Effective in Depression

FRIDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In a study in the United Kingdom, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions conducted online with a therapist reduced depression better than usual in-person care with a general practitioner, according to a study in the Aug. 22 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Comment

Sexual Minorities More Likely to Seek Mental Health Help

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbian and bisexual women and gay men are more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to seek treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, according to a study published Aug. 14 in BMC Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Adolescent Exercise Brings a Good Night's Sleep

THURSDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who exercise regularly sleep better and are less anxious and have fewer depressive symptoms than their non-exercising peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 by the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
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Heroin Component May Be Effective in Addiction Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Treating heroin addicts, who have previously failed treatment, with the active ingredient in heroin keeps them in treatment and reduces illegal activities better than methadone, according to a study in the Aug. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Personality Type Linked to Increased Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with peripheral arterial disease, Type D personality -- which is characterized by negative emotions and inhibited self-expression during social interactions -- is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality, according to a pilot study published in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Excessive Drinking Among Older Americans Studied

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of men and more than half of women over 50 years old drink alcohol, and at-risk and binge drinking are prevalent in the age group, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Magazines Often Depict Infants in Unsafe Sleep Positions

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Magazines widely read by women of childbearing age frequently depict infants sleeping in unsafe positions or environments that do not meet American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines and may place them at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Short Children Found to Be as Well-Adjusted as Peers

TUESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Except for a marginal increase in peer victimization, children who are short in stature do not seem to have any added emotional or behavioral problems compared to non-short peers, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Use of Mental Health Help Low for Young Adults in Need

MONDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although young adults suspected of being maltreated during adolescence have a high prevalence of mental health problems, only a small proportion use outpatient mental health services, according to research published in the August issue of Psychiatric Services.

Abstract
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Depression Shows Several Effects in Rheumatoid Arthritis

FRIDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, depression severity was associated with inflammation, and depression in the spouse predicted a worse disease course in patients, according to two studies published in the Aug. 15 Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract - Kojima
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Abstract - Lam
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Alarm Symptoms Often Do Not Result in Timely Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who present with certain alarm symptoms, including hematuria and rectal bleeding, do not receive a diagnosis in a reasonable amount of time, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in BMJ.

Abstract
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First Epileptic Seizure Linked to Cognitive Deficits

THURSDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Intellectually normal children with a first recognized epileptic seizure are significantly more likely than their healthy siblings to exhibit neuropsychological deficits, which suggests there is a window of opportunity for treatment that could reduce subsequent effects on academic performance, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Self-Control Can Lead to Girls Becoming Overweight

THURSDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Girls who have low inhibitory self-control are more apt to become overweight, especially if their parents try to restrict their eating habits, according to a study in the August Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Radiotherapy, Cognitive Decline Linked in Glioma

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Low-grade glioma patients who receive radiotherapy are at an increased risk of declining attentional functioning in the long term, regardless of fraction dose, according to a study in the September issue of The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Mindful Eating Linked to Yoga, Lower Body Mass Index

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A mindful eating questionnaire (MEQ) is a useful and valid measurement of mindful eating, considered nonjudgmental awareness of physical and emotional sensations associated with eating, and is associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and yoga, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Suicidality Varies by Age in Adults on Antidepressants

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The link between suicidality and use of antidepressants in adults is strongly age-dependent, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Visceral Fat, Social Stress, Atherosclerosis Linked

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- There is a direct relationship between coronary artery atherosclerosis, a high visceral to subcutaneous abdominal fat ratio, and social stress, supporting the hypothesis that social stress may worsen coronary artery atherosclerosis by increasing the amount of visceral fat in the body, according to research published in the August issue of Obesity.

Abstract
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Diet, Physical Activity and Risk of Alzheimer's Studied

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Following a Mediterranean diet and getting more physical activity may be associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease and slower cognitive decline, according to the results of two studies in the Aug. 12 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Scarmeas
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Abstract - Feart
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Most College Students Categorized as Poor Sleepers

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Inconsistent sleep-wake patterns and insufficient sleep occur at alarming rates among college students, leading to various physical and psychological health problems, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
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Optimism, Lower Hostility Linked to Reduced Mortality

TUESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Both optimism and cynical hostility are independently associated with cancer and coronary heart disease outcomes, including mortality, according to research published online Aug. 10 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Distress May Be Pre-Existing Condition in Teenage Moms

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage mothers are more distressed than their childless peers, but their distress usually precedes their pregnancy and results from family, school, socioeconomic and other factors, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract
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Best Treatment for Lower Extremity Sarcoma Unknown

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a lower prevalence of amputations, limb salvage surgery may not offer a more effective outcome for health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for younger individuals with bone and soft tissue sarcomas of the leg, according to a review published online Aug. 10 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Midlife Cholesterol Level Linked to Alzheimer's Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In middle age, even mildly elevated cholesterol levels are associated with a significantly increased risk of dementia later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders.

Abstract
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HHS Releases Reports on Health Insurance Reform

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released a series of state-by-state reports that outline its conclusions on the effects health insurance reform would have on health care for Americans, according to an Aug. 7 release issued by the agency.

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Intervention Found to Improve Depression After Stroke

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A brief psychosocial-behavioral intervention, when applied in addition to antidepressant treatment, can markedly reduce both short- and long-term depression following stroke, according to research published online Aug. 6 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Debatable

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Whether to continue to classify obsessive-compulsive disorder as an anxiety disorder is controversial, according to a review in the Aug. 8 issue of The Lancet. The review notes that biological and behavioral models can explain some aspects of the disorder and have helped to develop treatments.

Abstract
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Consumer Ads May Have Little Influence on Cancer Therapy

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Most individuals with cancer appear to be aware of direct-to-consumer advertising for cancer medications, but these ads may have little influence on their therapy, according to research published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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More Asthma Diagnoses After September 11 Attacks

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults exposed to the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center attacks developed asthma or post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Domestic Violence Screening, Referral Found Ineffective

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for domestic violence followed by referral to a clinician does not reduce the recurrence of violence among women, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

Elder Self-Neglect, Abuse Linked to Higher Death Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Elder self-neglect and abuse are associated with a higher risk of death, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

Editorial Opposes European Commission Proposals

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The United Kingdom should not accept new proposals from the European Commission that would allow drug companies to provide information about prescription-only drugs over the Internet and in some print publications, according to an editorial published in the August issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

Editorial

Links Explored Between Depression, Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Having coronary artery disease (CAD) may have a larger sustained effect on the risk of developing major depression than vice-versa, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Pain Relief Not Only Motive for Teenagers' Opioid Use

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of U.S. high school seniors report non-medical use of prescription opioids, and many of them are motivated by factors other than physical pain relief, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Cognitive Activities Beneficial in Preclinical Dementia

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults who are destined to develop dementia, those who frequently engage in intellectually stimulating leisure activities such as reading, writing, crossword puzzles, board or card games, group discussions, or playing music may significantly delay the onset of memory decline, according to a study published in the Aug. 4 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Preschool Depression May Not Be a Transient Phenomenon

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In preschoolers, depression is not a transient syndrome but is a significant predictor of recurrent or chronic depression, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Dramatic Increase Seen in Antidepressant Use

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1996 and 2005, antidepressant use in the United States nearly doubled but stayed relatively low among African-Americans and Hispanics, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Divorce May Have Long-Term Negative Impact on Health

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Marital disruption can have harmful effects on health even years later, and divorced individuals who later remarry may still have poorer health, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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Many Factors Affect Patients' GERD Treatment Satisfaction

MONDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, multiple factors affect how satisfied or dissatisfied they are with their treatment, according to a study published in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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