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Adiponectin Associated With Childhood Lymphoma

Last Updated: September 10, 2009.

 

Higher adiponectin levels at diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma linked to poorer survival

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Higher levels of adiponectin, but not leptin, are associated with childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as a poorer prognosis, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of adiponectin, but not leptin, are associated with childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as a poorer prognosis, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Eleni Th. Petridou, M.D., of the University of Athens Medical School in Greece, and colleagues analyzed data from 121 children with incident non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (mean age, 8.8 years) and 121 controls matched by age and sex. Guardians provided lifestyle and other information about cases and controls, and the children provided blood samples.

After adjustment for a variety of factors, the researchers found that higher levels of adiponectin were associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (odds ratio, 1.82); however, leptin was not associated with the disease. Higher adiponectin levels at diagnosis were associated with time to relapse and poorer survival, but leptin did not predict time to relapse or survival.

"In conclusion, this study demonstrates that elevated serum adiponectin, but not leptin, concentrations are an independent risk factor for development of childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Moreover, this study highlights the potential prognostic value of measuring serum adiponectin levels in childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as the former is associated with poor prognosis and survival," the authors conclude. "Further studies focusing on underlying mechanisms, evaluating the associated circulating cytokine networks and exploring potential adiponectin signaling pathways in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are needed."

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