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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Midlife Overweight in Women Leads to Later Poorer Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A woman who is overweight at midlife has significantly reduced odds of healthy survival past the age of 70, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

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Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Review Questions Statins in Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Currently, evidence doesn't appear to support the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association's Class I, Level of Evidence: A recommendation for initiating statin therapy in patients before discharge following an acute coronary syndrome episode, according to a commentary in the Oct. 6 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Morrissey
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Abstract - Waters & Ku
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Imaging Modality Shows Great Promise in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the new "gold standard imaging technique" for the assessment of heart anatomy, function and viability in heart failure patients, according to a report in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Imaging for Heart Disease Severity Impacts Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) to stratify disease severity subsequently had treatment and risk factor control stepped up, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Marker Shows Potential in Finding Heart Disease in Youth

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) appears to be an accurate marker of cardiovascular disease in children, one which may be of diagnostic value, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Examines Effects of In Utero Heart Procedure

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Successful fetal aortic valvuloplasty may lead to better growth of the aortic and mitral valves and the ascending aorta without change in left ventricular growth rate, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Autoantibody May Increase Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a particular autoimmune antibody have a much higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack, with an even higher risk if they take oral contraceptives or smoke, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Imaging Modalities for Heart Disease in Diabetics Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was superior to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at detecting coronary artery disease among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Abdominal Obesity May Affect Risks in Heart Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary heart disease, abdominal obesity independently predicts heart failure hospitalization and recurrent cardiovascular events, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Moderate Drinking May Reduce Men's Risk of Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive men, moderate drinking may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, in men and women at moderate risk of heart disease, pomegranate juice appears to have no effect on the overall progression of carotid intima-media thickness, according to two studies in the Oct. 1 American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract - Britton
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Abstract - Davidson
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Hydration Procedure Found to Benefit Kidney Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mild renal insufficiency who undergo elective coronary procedures, standard hydration plus a single-bolus intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate may effectively reduce the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy compared to standard hydration alone, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Can Cause Lifelong Ills

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minimal-change nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk for osteoporosis, hypertension, sperm abnormalities and cataracts if the condition persists beyond puberty, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Early Pregnancy Use of SSRIs and Congenital Defects Studied

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with a higher prevalence of septal heart defects in offspring, according to research published online Sept. 23 in BMJ.

Abstract
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New Paradigm for Progress in Surgery Proposed

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a series of articles in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet, a cohort of surgical-thought leaders proposes a new paradigm for innovation, research, and evidence-based advancement in the field of surgery.

Abstract - Barkun
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Abstract - Ergina
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Abstract - McCulloch
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Endocrine Guidelines Developed for Transsexuals

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A new clinical practice guideline offers advice for the endocrine treatment of transsexuals, according to a special article published in the September Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Multiple Strokes Linked to Higher Risk for Post-Stroke Dementia

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing dementia after stroke is higher in patients who have had multiple strokes, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Meta-Analysis Finds Flu Linked to Heart Attack and Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease, getting influenza increases the risk of heart attack and death, and cardiac patients should be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated, according to a literature review and meta-analysis reported in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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Many Factors Figure Into Cardiovascular Risk Estimation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A number of factors affect the usefulness of risk estimation systems for predicting atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients, including patient age and the applicability of the system to different populations, according to research published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Rosuvastatin Merits Wider Use for Heart Disease Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing rosuvastatin for patients with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels has enough benefits in terms of number needed to treat values to merit wide use in primary prevention of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Inflammation Linked to Peripheral Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammatory markers are consistently associated with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and particular outcomes, but are not necessarily causally associated; and, although genetics may play an important role, no genetic marker has been associated with the disease, according to a review in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Public Smoking Bans Linked to Fewer Heart Attacks

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bans on smoking in public are associated with a drop in hospitalizations for heart attacks and the benefits increase with time, according to one study in the Sept. 29 Journal of the American College of Cardiology and a second study published online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract - Meyers
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Abstract - Lightwood
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Measures Could Help in Fight Against Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New performance measures for cardiovascular care will improve health care providers' efforts to prevent heart disease among their patients, according to a joint statement published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

Full Text - JACC
Abstract - Circulation
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Hispanics Show Lower Artery Bypass Rate After PCI

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Despite having a higher cardiovascular risk profile than Caucasians, Hispanics are less likely to have coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in the year after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Heart Risks in Midlife Reduce Men's Life Expectancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged men with cardiovascular risk factors, long-term life expectancy is significantly shortened even if they subsequently modify those risk factors, according to a study published Sept. 17 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Search Finds Higher Pediatric Ischemic Stroke Rate

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Using radiology searches results in a substantially higher estimate of the incidence of pediatric ischemic stroke than previous estimates, according to research published online Sept. 17 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Treatments for Acute Respiratory Failure Compared

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients suffering acute respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is superior to conventional ventilation support in terms of survival without disability, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Physical Activity Can Improve Mortality Risk in Old Age

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Remaining physically active well into old age substantially improves survival as well as the odds of preserving independence and daily functioning as the years pile up, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Lipid Screening Cost Effective for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid screening in survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma who receive mediastinal irradiation, which increases their risk of coronary heart disease, is most cost effective if done every three years, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Diabetes Treatments May Not Reduce Inflammatory Markers

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, treatment with insulin or metformin does not significantly improve inflammatory biomarker levels compared to placebo, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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More Chest Compressions in CPR May Improve Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The more that emergency personnel perform chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a patient in cardiac arrest, the greater the odds of patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Three Medications Beneficial in Breast Cancer Prevention

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Three medications -- the selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, and tibolone, a drug not approved in the United States but used in many other countries to treat menopausal symptoms -- may reduce the risk for primary breast cancer. However, the three drugs are variously associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, endometrial cancer, or stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Portion of Population at Low Cardio Risk Down Since 1999

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A modest increase in the portion of the U.S. population at low cardiovascular risk from 1971 to 1994 has reversed since 1999, pointing out the need for greater efforts at lifestyle modification and prevention, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Aerobic Exercise May Improve Arterial Function in Obese Men

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese middle-age men, habitual exercise may significantly increase central arterial distensibility according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Lovastatin Reduces Coronary Events Based on Cholesterol

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with no cardiovascular risk factors who take lovastatin have a lower risk of developing major coronary events if they have substantial increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and substantial decreases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the first year of treatment, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Study Explores Framingham Score, CAD Relationship

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a strong correlation between Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and the development of functionally relevant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Drug Shown to Aid Patients With Resistant Hypertension

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The vasodilator darusentan significantly lowers blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is resistant to current drugs, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Exercise May Decrease Hepatic Lipids Without Weight Loss

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In obese, sedentary adults, regular aerobic exercise significantly reduces hepatic lipids even in the absence of weight loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
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Screening Athletes Could Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should undergo routine screening for heart abnormalities, as the practice would help prevent sudden death, according to two articles published in the September issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, a special issue in partnership with the International Olympic Committee dedicated to elite sports injury prevention.

Abstract - Bessem
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Review (subscription or payment may be required)
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Waist-Hip Ratio Better Predictor of Seniors' Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In high-functioning older adults, waist-hip ratio is a more accurate predictor of all-cause mortality than either body mass index or waist circumference, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Epidemiology.

Abstract
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Quick Stenting Beneficial in Heart Attacks in Remote Areas

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who live in rural areas with long transfer times to angioplasty have significant improvements in the rate of death, reinfarction, and stroke if they receive angioplasty immediately after thrombolysis, according to a study presented at the 2009 European Society of Cardiology Congress and published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

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Cardiology Work Force Crisis Looms as Cases Set to Rocket

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The cardiology work force will need to double by 2050 if it is to keep pace with the growing number of patients requiring specialist cardiology care, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and presented at an ACC media telebriefing earlier today.

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Statins May Offer Improved Outcomes for COPD Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Statins appear to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but more interventional trials are needed to specifically assess the drugs' effect on relevant COPD outcomes, according to a literature review in the Sept. 1 issue of Chest.

Abstract
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In-Hospital Pediatric Diagnosis of VTE Up 70 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Yearly pediatric hospital cases of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have risen 70 percent in this decade, with many children having coexisting chronic conditions, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Higher Bone Lead Levels Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Lead concentration in the bones accumulated in prior decades of environmental exposure is associated with all-cause and all-cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Can Hike Peripheral Artery Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Women with the array of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at elevated risk for the eventual development of peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Reducing Americans' Salt Intake Can Save Health Costs

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing a population's sodium consumption can result in health care savings due to lower incidence of hypertension and can also bring quality-of-life improvements, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Article

Study Supports Protocol for Cardiac Computed Tomography

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adenosine stress computed tomography (CT) may have similar accuracy in discovering stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoking Linked to Arrhythmia Recurrence in Women Only

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may be associated with a greater risk of atrial arrhythmia recurrence in women following cardioversion, and a higher risk of death in men, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Waist-Height Ratio Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The waist-to-height ratio may be useful in detecting central obesity and its related cardiovascular risk factors in normal-weight adults, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Thigh Size Can Have Impact on Risk of Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A thigh circumference below 60 centimeters is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease and premature mortality in both men and women, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Adults Who Play Video Games May Experience Health Effects

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Playing video games is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) among men and more depression and poorer self-health perceptions among women in comparison with non-playing peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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AHA Advocates Atherosclerosis Assessment in Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In a scientific statement published online Sept. 3 in Hypertension, the American Heart Association has promulgated recommendations for a standardized approach to the noninvasive assessment of children and adolescents for the earliest signs of approaching atherosclerosis.

Abstract
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Bleeding Rates in Elderly A-Fib Patients on Warfarin Assessed

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- With careful management, elderly patients with atrial fibrillation may be able to use oral anticoagulant treatment while maintaining a reasonably low risk of major bleeding complications, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Angiography Before Vascular Surgery May Be Beneficial

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Routine coronary angiography may improve long-term outcomes in certain patients undergoing surgery for peripheral arterial disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Scant Evidence of Combination Lipid Therapy Benefit Found

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is scant evidence to support the use of combination lipid-lowering therapies over high-dose statin monotherapy to treat patients at high risk of coronary disease, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Statin Therapy Before Vascular Surgery Cuts Cardiac Events

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Administering fluvastatin to patients in advance of vascular surgery can reduce the incidence of adverse cardiac events postoperatively, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Alcohol Use Associated With More Physical Activity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink alcohol -- even heavily -- may be more likely to engage in physical activity, according to research published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Article

Carbon Monoxide Exposure Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease episodes in urban areas rise with same-day increases in the environmental level of carbon monoxide (CO), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Self-Care Help Needed for Heart Failure Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Acknowledging shortcomings of the health care system in promoting self-care for heart failure patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) has offered recommendations for clinicians and family members in a scientific statement published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

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Secondhand Smoke, Pollution Pose Cardiovascular Risks

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- While risks of cardiovascular mortality are greatest for active cigarette smokers, the relative risk for people exposed to secondhand smoke or air pollution is significant, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Top Hospitals Have Slightly Better Heart Failure Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitals ranked by the U.S. News & World Report as the best providers of heart care and surgery achieve better 30-day mortality rates than their non-ranked counterparts, readmission rates are similar regardless of ranking, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
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Nadroparin May Prevent Blood Clots During Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced solid cancer, nadroparin may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Intervention Delay Has Little Effect on Heart Conditions

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndromes, delaying intervention for a day does not affect heart attack rates and other outcomes, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Findings Point to Link Between Cholesterol and Bone Loss

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The RANKL protein may play a role in a relationship between oxidized lipids and immune-mediated bone loss, according to research published online Aug. 22 in Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
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Epinephrine Dosage for Anesthetic Overdose Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In an experiment on rats whose hearts were stopped by anesthetic overdose, the administration of the hormone epinephrine above a dose threshold was found to counteract lipid-based resuscitation, according to a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology.

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Imaging Strategy Can Help Assess Pancreatic Perfusion

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling can be used to assess microcirculation of the pancreas in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study reported in the September issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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More Problems Seen in Women With Endovascular AAA Repair

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms had a higher risk of mortality and morbidity than men, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

Abstract
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