Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

September 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Post-Surgery Complications, Mortality in Hospitals Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- While post-surgery complication rates were similar across hospitals, the death rate for hospitals in the quintile with the highest complication-related mortality were nearly twice that of the lowest quintile, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Treating Gestational Diabetes Can Reduce Fetal Overgrowth

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women did not significantly affect stillbirth or perinatal death, but did reduce the risk of fetal overgrowth, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cooling Can Reduce Neurologic Damage in Perinatal Asphyxia

WEDNESADY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the body temperature of newborn infants who have perinatal asphyxia encephalopathy did not reduce the rates of death or severe disability, but lessened the neurologic damage among survivors, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Data Model May Predict Risk of Future Domestic Abuse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Readily available patient medical data can be used in a Bayesian model to estimate the future risk of a diagnosis involving domestic abuse, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Midlife Overweight in Women Leads to Later Poorer Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A woman who is overweight at midlife has significantly reduced odds of healthy survival past the age of 70, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Combination Treatment Found Effective for Neuropathic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A combination treatment of gabapentin and nortriptyline relieve chronic neuropathic pain better than either medication given as monotherapy, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Efficacy of Treatments for Overactive Bladder Examined

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Sacral nerve stimulation and botulinum toxin are effective treatments for overactive bladder, according to two studies in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract - White
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Giannantoni
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Research Finds Limited Benefit From PSA Test

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men should be aware of their chances of benefits and harms from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing before the test, but many are not discussing screening before making the decision, according to the results of two studies in the Sept. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Howard
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Hoffman
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Role of Estrogen Supported in Colorectal Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The finding that younger women with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) survive longer than younger men -- which is not seen in older patients -- supports the idea that estrogen may play a role in improved outcomes in the disease, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Questions Statins in Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Currently, evidence doesn't appear to support the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association's Class I, Level of Evidence: A recommendation for initiating statin therapy in patients before discharge following an acute coronary syndrome episode, according to a commentary in the Oct. 6 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Morrissey
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Waters & Ku
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bladder Cancer Surgery Delay Linked to Poorer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with bladder cancer, less delay between transurethral tumor resection and cystectomy may improve the chances of survival, particularly in those with lower stage disease, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Cancer Outcome Can Be Affected by Social Support

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who are socially isolated may be more likely to have tumor growth as a result of the stress caused by loneliness, compared to their more socially supported counterparts, according to a study in mice published online Sept. 29 in Cancer Prevention Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Imaging Modality Shows Great Promise in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the new "gold standard imaging technique" for the assessment of heart anatomy, function and viability in heart failure patients, according to a report in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stroke Strikes Without Warning in Majority of Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute stroke, only one in eight have a warning from a prior transient ischemic attack, according to a study published in the September issue of Neurology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Leptin-Impaired Obese Mice Not Found to Develop Arthritis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In leptin-impaired mice, the resulting extreme obesity does not cause knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Imaging for Heart Disease Severity Impacts Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) to stratify disease severity subsequently had treatment and risk factor control stepped up, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exertional Illnesses Linked to Anesthesia Complication

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Possible links exist between heat- and exercise-related illnesses that strike even the physically fit and a feared complication of anesthesia, according to a review in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
Full Text

Marker Shows Potential in Finding Heart Disease in Youth

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) appears to be an accurate marker of cardiovascular disease in children, one which may be of diagnostic value, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Baseline Factors May Predict Mortality Risk in Myelofibrosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three baseline factors in the bone marrow disease myelofibrosis can be used to identify patients at the highest risk of death, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Spinal Opioid Infusion Deemed Probable Cause of Deaths

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An investigation into a cluster of deaths in patients being treated for non-cancer pain with intrathecal opioid pumps found that the pain relief therapy was the probable cause of death, according to a report in the October issue of Anesthesiology.

Full Text

People Want to Know About Costly Cancer Drug Options

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- If they had cancer, most Australians would want to know about an expensive anticancer drug (EACD), and many would be prepared to pay for it even if they could not afford to, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Autoantibody May Increase Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a particular autoimmune antibody have a much higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack, with an even higher risk if they take oral contraceptives or smoke, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Ultrasound Found Inadequate for Lymph Node Biopsy

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound scanners currently do not have sufficient resolution to biopsy sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) for evidence of cancer metastasis and cannot replace conventional SLN biopsy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Several Factors Affect Risk of Crashes in Teenage Drivers

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Parenting styles and primary access to vehicles significantly affects crash risks in teen drivers, according to two studies published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract - Ginsburg
Full Text
Abstract - Garcia-Espana
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Imaging Modalities for Heart Disease in Diabetics Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was superior to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at detecting coronary artery disease among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Biopsy Protocols Compared for Prostate Cancer Detection

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Twelve-core and eight-core biopsies have similar prostate cancer detection rates for initial biopsy, but the additional transition cores provided in 12-core biopsy may be helpful in detecting missed cancers in repeat biopsies, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Medication Usage Differs Among Hispanic Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In Hispanic children, acculturation differences affect medication usage, according to a study in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Abdominal Obesity May Affect Risks in Heart Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary heart disease, abdominal obesity independently predicts heart failure hospitalization and recurrent cardiovascular events, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Looks at Screening and Bilirubin Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of screening for hyperbilirubinemia on the incidence of acute and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy remains unknown, according to research published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Meningococcal Disease Jabs Should Be Repeated for Some

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- One dose of the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine may not be enough to confer ongoing protection, and vaccination should be repeated in those at high risk, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Socioeconomics Play Role in Prostate Cancer Mortality Odds

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients from low socioeconomic groups are more likely to die than their counterparts of high socioeconomic status, due to delayed diagnosis, poorer diagnostic methods and less invasive treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prophylactic Mastectomy Rare Among High-Risk Women

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is relatively uncommon for women at high risk for breast cancer, but without diagnosed disease, to opt for prophylactic mastectomy, but women diagnosed with breast cancer are increasingly likely to undergo contralateral mastectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Efficacy of Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test Explored

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the rapid influenza diagnostic test can accurately predict confirmed infection with pandemic H1N1 influenza, the test produces too many false negatives to be of use in the management of the disease pandemic, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Parental Understanding of Growth Charts Is Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although pediatricians commonly share children's growth chart data with parents, many parents have a poor understanding of the data, according to a study in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Test Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnostic test using cells from bronchoalveolar lavage is quick and effective in distinguishing active tuberculosis infection from latent infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis where the bacteria are undetectable in sputum, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Moderate Drinking May Reduce Men's Risk of Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive men, moderate drinking may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, in men and women at moderate risk of heart disease, pomegranate juice appears to have no effect on the overall progression of carotid intima-media thickness, according to two studies in the Oct. 1 American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract - Britton
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Davidson
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Back Pain in Pregnancy a Major Health Issue in Iran

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) in pregnancy is an extremely common health problem in Iran, affecting more than 84 percent of women at some point in their pregnancies, according to a study in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

More Information

Better Stove May Improve Women's Respiratory Health

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In rural Mexican women, use of an improved wood-burning stove is associated with better respiratory function compared to a traditional open fire, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Can Cause Lifelong Ills

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minimal-change nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk for osteoporosis, hypertension, sperm abnormalities and cataracts if the condition persists beyond puberty, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Pregnancy Use of SSRIs and Congenital Defects Studied

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with a higher prevalence of septal heart defects in offspring, according to research published online Sept. 23 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Warns Prescribers About Tamiflu Dosing Errors

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Public Health Alert to notify pharmacists and prescribers about the potential for dosing errors with oseltamivir (Tamiflu for Oral Suspension).

More Information

Maternal Bariatric Surgery Tied to Less Offspring Obesity

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in women before pregnancy helps reduce the risk of childhood obesity and improve cardio-metabolic markers in their offspring by improving the intrauterine environment, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Role of Nitric Oxide Studied in Antibiotic Resistance

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Nitric oxide created by bacterial nitric oxide synthases (bNOS) may help protect bacteria from numerous antibiotics, according to research published in the Sept. 11 issue of Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lower Legal Drinking Age Linked to Later Problems

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who were able to legally purchase alcohol at younger ages may have a higher risk of recent alcohol or drug disorders, even decades later, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise During Pregnancy Cuts Odds of Overweight Baby

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise during pregnancy lowers the odds of giving birth to an excessively heavy baby, but exercise before pregnancy may not make a difference, according to a study published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Procedure Compares Well for Sleep Apnea Treatment

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Multilevel radiofrequency tissue volume reduction may offer similar improvements in sleep apnea-related symptoms compared to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fat Hormone May Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A fragment of the fat hormone adiponectin improves glucose and lipid metabolism and restores insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant diabetic mice, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Meta-Analysis Finds Flu Linked to Heart Attack and Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease, getting influenza increases the risk of heart attack and death, and cardiac patients should be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated, according to a literature review and meta-analysis reported in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Tool May Accurately Predict Cervical Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new tool for assessing cervical cancer risk may offer clinicians a simpler method for making treatment decisions than commonly used management algorithms, according to an article published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet Oncology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Factors Figure Into Cardiovascular Risk Estimation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A number of factors affect the usefulness of risk estimation systems for predicting atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients, including patient age and the applicability of the system to different populations, according to research published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Postpartum Bleeding Higher After Cesarean

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of severe postpartum hemorrhage increases after induction and pre-labor cesarean section, according to a study in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Live-Virus Vaccine Shows Promise Against Rabies

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A rabies vaccine made with a live virus lacking a gene needed for replication appears safe and effective with a simpler dosing regimen than the current post-exposure vaccine, according to results of animal studies published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Explores Head, Neck Cancer Radiation Completion

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with head and neck cancer, having surgery or chemotherapy may influence their likelihood of completing radiotherapy, according to research published in the September Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Found to Lessen Risk for Enlarged Prostate

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A man's risk of developing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP) decreases as his consumption of alcohol increases, but not the risk of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), according to a meta-analysis reported in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug May Slow Progression of Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with rasagiline may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients with very mild disease, according to a study in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Inactivated Vaccine Worked Best in 2007/2008 Flu Season

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Inactivated influenza vaccines were the most effective during the 2007/2008 flu season, but live attenuated vaccines also provided some protection, according to a study in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Interventions Could Reduce Maternal Mortality in Africa

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Improved health facilities and greater access to misoprostol and antibiotics in the community could prevent thousands of maternal deaths in Africa annually, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Widowhood Affects Sexual Infection Risk in Older Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Older men may have an increased risk of sexually transmitted infections after losing a spouse, especially if they take medications for erectile dysfunction, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Rosuvastatin Merits Wider Use for Heart Disease Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing rosuvastatin for patients with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels has enough benefits in terms of number needed to treat values to merit wide use in primary prevention of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidelines Offered for Emergency Pediatric Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A joint policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Emergency Physicians, intended to help hospital emergency departments maintain the appropriate resources and personnel to properly serve pediatric patients, has been published online Sept. 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Study Finds Obesity Impairs Leukemia Treatment Response

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity may directly impair the efficacy of leukemia treatment, according to an animal study published online Sept. 22 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Surgeries Offering Relief for Excessive Drooling Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with drooling will report improvement in symptoms following surgical treatment, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rhinoplasty Patients Typically Want the 'Ideal Nose'

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Rhinoplasty patients typically want results in line with the ideal parameters established by Powell and Humphreys, a common reference for the procedure, and computer imaging can help define patients' preferences, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoking Associated With Lupus Erythematosus

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for lupus erythematosus but alcohol consumption is not, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Intensive Care Patients Can Benefit From Physical Medicine

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to prevent neuromuscular complications after critical illness can begin in intensive care as soon as a patient is physiologically stabilized, according to a study in the October issue of Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Simplified System Reduces Overtriage in Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A simplified triage system based on only four variables considerably reduces the overtriage rate with an acceptable undertriage rate in trauma patients, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obstetric Training Can Be Ranked by Complication Rates

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Residency programs for obstetricians can be ranked for quality by comparing the maternal complications rates for the cohorts of physicians that graduate from the programs, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mindfulness Training Can Improve Physician Well-Being

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians participating in a program teaching self-awareness and mindful communication were able to reduce stress and burnout while improving their sense of well-being and other traits associated with patient-centered care, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hot Flush Severity Linked to Estrogen Effects on Vasculature

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Oral estrogen treatment of recently postmenopausal women has adverse effects on vasculature in women with relatively mild hot flushes, suggesting that hot flush severity should be taken into account when assessing hormone therapy, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Most Pregnant Women Can Safely Fly

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women can safely fly as long as they do not have any obstetric or other medical complications, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Supplementation Helps Avert Melanoma Relapse

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent melanoma relapse and increase the chance that tumors will be thinner if relapse does occur, according to research published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Inflammation Linked to Peripheral Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammatory markers are consistently associated with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and particular outcomes, but are not necessarily causally associated; and, although genetics may play an important role, no genetic marker has been associated with the disease, according to a review in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Overweight Can Complicate Aneuploidy Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although body mass index does not affect the visual quality of nuchal translucency ultrasound tests, women with a higher body mass index take longer to complete the test and more need transvaginal ultrasound compared with normal weight women, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Cancer Prevention Drugs and Cognition Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women, have similar effects on cognition, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Public Smoking Bans Linked to Fewer Heart Attacks

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bans on smoking in public are associated with a drop in hospitalizations for heart attacks and the benefits increase with time, according to one study in the Sept. 29 Journal of the American College of Cardiology and a second study published online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract - Meyers
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Lightwood
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Measures Could Help in Fight Against Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New performance measures for cardiovascular care will improve health care providers' efforts to prevent heart disease among their patients, according to a joint statement published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

Full Text - JACC
Abstract - Circulation
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Linked to Decreased Mortality After Head Injury

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with traumatic brain injuries who test positive for alcohol are less likely to die but more likely to have complications than patients who test negative, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Acid Reflux Surgery Unaffected by Delayed Gastric Emptying

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) does not affect control and relief of acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who undergo Nissen fundoplication, although patients with DGE still have more dyspeptic symptoms, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Impaired Financial Skills Could Help Predict Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may have faltering financial reasoning in the year before converting to Alzheimer's disease, which could have implications for their families, according to research published in the Sept. 22 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sclerotic Skin Diseases Often Have Psychosocial Impact

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The chronic sclerotic skin diseases eosinophilic fasciitis and morphea can be accompanied by physical pain, psychological distress, perceived social stigmatization, and other impacts that combine to impair the patient's quality of life, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tanning May Put Very-Light-Skinned Youth at Higher Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Very-light-skinned children who tan develop more nevi than their counterparts who do not, which may indicate increased risk of developing melanoma when they are older, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology, while another study in the same issue recommends more states implement controls on youth access to tanning facilities.

Abstract - Aalborg
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Pichon
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Nurses Seldom Tackle Parents About Smoking

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric nurses are often in contact with smokers among the parents of their patients, but they seldom engage in smoking cessation activities with them, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Scoliosis Surgery Linked to Good Long-Term Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the long term, patients who receive surgical treatment for scoliosis are no more likely to develop low back pain or have an impaired quality of life than the general population, according to two studies in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pain Linked to Functional Decline in Middle-Aged Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, pain is associated with an accelerated decline in physical function, with mobility limitations similar to those decades older without pain, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Testing Over Phone, in Person Found Similar

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Conducting neuropsychological tests by telephone may provide similar results as tests administered in person for assessing cognition in older woman, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Even Lower Blood Lead in Children Can Impair Function

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Lead levels in the blood of young children are associated with hindered educational attainment at concentrations half that previously considered as a cause for concern, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Papers Look at Lung Cancer Factors in Never Smokers

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A guide to lung cancer in never smokers offers an overview of the disease, a description of the epidemiology and risk factors for lung cancer in those who have never smoked, a

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: September 2009 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology Next: September 2009 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.