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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Role of Estrogen Supported in Colorectal Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The finding that younger women with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) survive longer than younger men -- which is not seen in older patients -- supports the idea that estrogen may play a role in improved outcomes in the disease, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Prognostic Tool May Benefit GI Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo surgery to remove primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a new computer-based tool called a nomogram accurately predicts the risk of cancer recurrence and may help clinicians determine which patients are candidates for adjuvant imatinib therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Cirrhosis Complication Linked to Increased Crash Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, those with minimal hepatic encephalopathy diagnosed by the inhibitory control test have significantly higher motor vehicle crash rates than those without the condition, according to a study in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Study Looks at Screening and Bilirubin Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of screening for hyperbilirubinemia on the incidence of acute and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy remains unknown, according to research published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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New Paradigm for Progress in Surgery Proposed

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a series of articles in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet, a cohort of surgical-thought leaders proposes a new paradigm for innovation, research, and evidence-based advancement in the field of surgery.

Abstract - Barkun
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Abstract - Ergina
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Abstract - McCulloch
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Maternal Bariatric Surgery Tied to Less Offspring Obesity

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in women before pregnancy helps reduce the risk of childhood obesity and improve cardio-metabolic markers in their offspring by improving the intrauterine environment, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Acid Reflux Surgery Unaffected by Delayed Gastric Emptying

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) does not affect control and relief of acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who undergo Nissen fundoplication, although patients with DGE still have more dyspeptic symptoms, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Sleep Aid May Lead to More Acid Reflux Exposure

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The sleep-inducing drug zolpidem may help patients with gastroesophageal reflux sleep through reflux events, increasing their acid exposure, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Study Explores Genetic Links to Crohn's Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic polymorphisms may be associated with risk of certain complications in individuals with Crohn's disease, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Gastric Bypass Patients Need Modified Nursing Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department nurses treating patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery need to adapt their routine methods of care to treat such patients safely, according to an article published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Post-Op Esophageal Bleeding Not Linked to Coagulation

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bleeding from ulceration after elective esophageal varices band ligation (EVL) does not appear to be associated with abnormal blood coagulation, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Smoking, Alcohol Linked to Earlier Cancer Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pancreatic cancer who smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol are diagnosed at a younger age than patients who do not smoke or drink, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nighttime Reflux Disease, Sleep Difficulties Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nighttime symptoms are highly prevalent and the resulting sleep difficulties are associated with increased doctor visits, decreased productivity, and a lower quality of life, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Hispanic/Latino Community Has Unique Cancer Profile

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics and Latinos have a unique cancer profile that means they are less likely to get the four most common cancers, but are more likely to develop cancers related to infection, according to a report published Sept. 15 by the American Cancer Society.

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Celiac Disease Linked to Modestly Increased Death Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with confirmed or latent celiac disease -- including those who underwent small-intestinal biopsy in childhood -- there is a modestly increased risk of death, according to a study in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Dimenhydrinate of Little Help in Pediatric Gastroenteritis

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Administering dimenhydrinate suppositories to children with infectious gastroenteritis can reduce vomiting but does not significantly improve rehydration and overall outcome, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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HLA Alleles May Help Stratify Celiac Disease Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at risk for celiac disease, it's possible to stratify risk on the basis of HLA-DQ genotype, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Exercise May Decrease Hepatic Lipids Without Weight Loss

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In obese, sedentary adults, regular aerobic exercise significantly reduces hepatic lipids even in the absence of weight loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Safety-Net Patients Unlikely to Undergo Colorectal Screens

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients served by a safety-net health system, colorectal cancer screening rates are significantly lower than the national average, according to a study published in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Perineural Invasion Points to Colorectal Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Perineural invasion (PNI) is often not included in pathology reports for colorectal cancer, but it may serve as a predictor of outcomes in these cases, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lapatinib Minimally Effective Against Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lapatinib is not effective in reducing disease progression in patients with advanced liver cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Most Chronic Coughs in Kids From Allergy, Asthma or Reflux

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The great majority of chronic coughs without obvious cause among pediatric patients are from allergies, asthma or gastroesophageal reflux disease, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Chest.

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Retreatment Benefits Some Hepatitis C Non-Responders

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic hepatitis C infection who fail to respond to standard antiviral therapy, retreatment with either pegylated interferon alfa plus ribavirin or pegylated interferon alfa plus ribavirin in combination with antiviral therapies may lead to a sustained virologic response, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Gene Linked to Cystic Fibrosis With Liver Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The SERPINA1 Z allele is associated with severe liver disease with portal hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis (CFLD), according to a study in the Sept. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Diagnoses, Health Costs Rise in Partners of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use increases in partners of cancer patients following the cancer diagnosis, according to research published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Endoscopy as Effective as Surgery for Esophageal Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Early-stage esophageal cancer can be removed through an endoscope rather than removing the whole esophagus, with no apparent effect on survival, according to a study in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Racial Disparities in Pancreatic Cancer Risk Explored

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer do not explain why incidence of the disease is substantially higher in African-Americans versus Caucasians, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Blood Test May Help Identify Pancreatic Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- MicroRNA profiling in plasma may allow for the early detection and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Nadroparin May Prevent Blood Clots During Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced solid cancer, nadroparin may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Imaging Strategy Can Help Assess Pancreatic Perfusion

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling can be used to assess microcirculation of the pancreas in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study reported in the September issue of Radiology.

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