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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cooling Can Reduce Neurologic Damage in Perinatal Asphyxia

WEDNESADY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the body temperature of newborn infants who have perinatal asphyxia encephalopathy did not reduce the rates of death or severe disability, but lessened the neurologic damage among survivors, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Combination Treatment Found Effective for Neuropathic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A combination treatment of gabapentin and nortriptyline relieve chronic neuropathic pain better than either medication given as monotherapy, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Efficacy of Treatments for Overactive Bladder Examined

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Sacral nerve stimulation and botulinum toxin are effective treatments for overactive bladder, according to two studies in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract - White
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Abstract - Giannantoni
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Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Stroke Strikes Without Warning in Majority of Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute stroke, only one in eight have a warning from a prior transient ischemic attack, according to a study published in the September issue of Neurology.

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Exertional Illnesses Linked to Anesthesia Complication

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Possible links exist between heat- and exercise-related illnesses that strike even the physically fit and a feared complication of anesthesia, according to a review in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Spinal Opioid Infusion Deemed Probable Cause of Deaths

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An investigation into a cluster of deaths in patients being treated for non-cancer pain with intrathecal opioid pumps found that the pain relief therapy was the probable cause of death, according to a report in the October issue of Anesthesiology.

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Autoantibody May Increase Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a particular autoimmune antibody have a much higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack, with an even higher risk if they take oral contraceptives or smoke, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cirrhosis Complication Linked to Increased Crash Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, those with minimal hepatic encephalopathy diagnosed by the inhibitory control test have significantly higher motor vehicle crash rates than those without the condition, according to a study in the October issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
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Study Looks at Screening and Bilirubin Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of screening for hyperbilirubinemia on the incidence of acute and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy remains unknown, according to research published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Low Back Pain in Pregnancy a Major Health Issue in Iran

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) in pregnancy is an extremely common health problem in Iran, affecting more than 84 percent of women at some point in their pregnancies, according to a study in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Neck Index Found Adequate in Test-Retest Reliability

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mechanical neck disorders, the Neck Disability Index demonstrates adequate responsiveness, according to a study published in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Drain Can Reduce Hematoma Recurrence and Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Placement of a soft silicon drain tube during the surgical procedure to drain a chronic subdural hematoma reduces both recurrence of the brain hematoma and mortality, according to a study in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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New Paradigm for Progress in Surgery Proposed

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a series of articles in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet, a cohort of surgical-thought leaders proposes a new paradigm for innovation, research, and evidence-based advancement in the field of surgery.

Abstract - Barkun
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Abstract - Ergina
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Abstract - McCulloch
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Multiple Strokes Linked to Higher Risk for Post-Stroke Dementia

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing dementia after stroke is higher in patients who have had multiple strokes, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Drug May Slow Progression of Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with rasagiline may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients with very mild disease, according to a study in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Intensive Care Patients Can Benefit From Physical Medicine

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to prevent neuromuscular complications after critical illness can begin in intensive care as soon as a patient is physiologically stabilized, according to a study in the October issue of Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Breast Cancer Prevention Drugs and Cognition Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women, have similar effects on cognition, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Alcohol Linked to Decreased Mortality After Head Injury

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with traumatic brain injuries who test positive for alcohol are less likely to die but more likely to have complications than patients who test negative, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Impaired Financial Skills Could Help Predict Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may have faltering financial reasoning in the year before converting to Alzheimer's disease, which could have implications for their families, according to research published in the Sept. 22 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Cognitive Testing Over Phone, in Person Found Similar

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Conducting neuropsychological tests by telephone may provide similar results as tests administered in person for assessing cognition in older woman, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Drug May Improve Outcomes for CNS Lymphomas

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of high-dose cytarabine to standard methotrexate treatment of primary central nervous system lymphomas greatly improves remission rates, according to a study published early online Sept. 20 in The Lancet to coincide with the European Cancer Organisation meeting in Berlin.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Scoliosis Revision Surgery Rate Seen at Center

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with idiopathic scoliosis who undergo primary fusion surgery, reoperation rates may vary greatly between institutions, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Search Finds Higher Pediatric Ischemic Stroke Rate

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Using radiology searches results in a substantially higher estimate of the incidence of pediatric ischemic stroke than previous estimates, according to research published online Sept. 17 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Drug May Be Effective for Optical Autoimmune Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mycophenolate mofetil may be a safe and effective treatment for neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology. A related study in the same issue concludes that an immunofluorescence (IF) assay is much more sensitive than an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay in diagnosing the disease.

Abstract - Jacob
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Abstract - McKeon
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Stroke Education Mailing Cut Time-to-Hospital for Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A population-based intervention, in the form of a letter emphasizing the need for rapid medical care for stroke, effectively reduced delays in women getting to the hospital, but not men, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Earlier Parkinson's Treatment Based on Disability, Education

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early Parkinson's disease are more likely to need treatment earlier with greater impairment, disability, and education level, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Prediction Rules for Brain Injury Can Cut Down on Scans

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Children at very low risk for brain injury following head trauma can be identified using a set of prediction rules that obviate the need for a computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Portion of Population at Low Cardio Risk Down Since 1999

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A modest increase in the portion of the U.S. population at low cardiovascular risk from 1971 to 1994 has reversed since 1999, pointing out the need for greater efforts at lifestyle modification and prevention, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Microcephaly Evaluation Guidelines Issued

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Because microcephaly is associated with developmental delays, learning disorders and neurologic conditions, children with microcephaly should be screened for such problems, according to a special article published in the Sept. 15 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Aerobic Exercise May Improve Arterial Function in Obese Men

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese middle-age men, habitual exercise may significantly increase central arterial distensibility according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Studies Explore Genetic Factors Underlying Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple genetic factors may help predict patient response to antidepressants, and a haplotype in the CRHR1 gene may help protect individuals who were subjected to childhood mistreatment from depression in adulthood, according to the results of two studies published in the September Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Polanczyk
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Abstract - Ising
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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Twin Study Eyes Inflammation in Those With Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An association between proinflammatory monocytes and bipolar disorder is largely due to a common shared environmental factor, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

Abstract
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S. pneumoniae Leads to Death in Many Under 5

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 11 percent of all deaths in children aged 1 to 59 months are due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and greater efforts to prevent and treat disease associated with the bacterium could help attain the United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Viruria Could Help Predict Rare Condition in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Analyzing the urine of multiple sclerosis patients for JC virus could help identify those at risk of developing another rare demyelinating disease after natalizumab (Tysabri) treatment, according to a study in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. And two additional reports detail cases of this rare condition, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

Abstract - Chen
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Case Study - Wenning (subscription or payment may be required)
Case Study - Linda (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Compensation Status Doesn't Delay Canadians' Back Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In Canadian patients with sciatica from a herniated lumbar disc, compensation status has no effect on waiting times for elective surgical lumbar discectomy, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Spinal Nerve Infiltration Has Potential in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low back pain and radicular pain, an L2 spinal nerve infiltration may temporarily reduce symptoms, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Infections Linked to Mental Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Acute systemic inflammation linked to episodes of illness or injury may speed the rate of cognitive decline in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Antipyretics Not Found to Stop Recurrent Febrile Seizures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antipyretic agents cannot prevent the recurrence of febrile seizures, although they can lower temperature in non-seizure febrile episodes, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Dopamine Reward Pathway Linked to ADHD Deficits

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rewards-motivation deficits reported in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be associated with a disruption in the mesoaccumbens dopamine reward pathway evidenced by reduced dopamine synaptic markers seen in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Study Implicates Hippocampal Region in Schizophrenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A subfield of the hippocampal formation may be involved in the early stages of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Chronic Alcohol Consumption Interferes With Body Clock

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic alcohol consumption interferes with circadian rhythms in hamsters, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Abstract
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Appetite Hormone Acts on Brain to Regulate Bone

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The fat hormone leptin regulates bone mass and suppresses appetite by acting through serotonin pathways in the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 4 issue of Cell.

Abstract
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HIV-Associated Dementia Linked to Disease Subtype

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-associated cognitive impairment may be more common in persons who are infected with the HIV subtype D, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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AHA Advocates Atherosclerosis Assessment in Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In a scientific statement published online Sept. 3 in Hypertension, the American Heart Association has promulgated recommendations for a standardized approach to the noninvasive assessment of children and adolescents for the earliest signs of approaching atherosclerosis.

Abstract
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Underlying Conditions in Kids Increase Risks From Swine Flu

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- At least 36 children younger than 18 years of age are among the nearly 500 Americans who have died of complications from H1N1 swine flu, according to a new government report in the Sept. 4 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Cancer Drug Targets Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug, GDC-0449, that targets the hedgehog pathway has shown promise in the treatment of basal-cell cancer and medulloblastoma, according to two reports and an editorial published online Sept. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Von Hoff
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Abstract - Rudin
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Editorial

Smoking Linked to Higher Multiple Sclerosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers may face a higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis, but the risk increase may not be due to nicotine, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Surgical, Gradual Menopause Effects on Cognition Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Natural menopause and surgical menopause might have different effects on cognitive function, according to the results of animal research published in the September issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
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Neurologists Should Report Reactions to Flu Vaccine

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Neurologists should report any possible new cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome after immunization with the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine to health officials.

www.vaers.hhs.gov
CDC - H1N1 Update
American Academy of Neurology
The Brain Matters - Public Web Site

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