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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Data Model May Predict Risk of Future Domestic Abuse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Readily available patient medical data can be used in a Bayesian model to estimate the future risk of a diagnosis involving domestic abuse, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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People Want to Know About Costly Cancer Drug Options

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- If they had cancer, most Australians would want to know about an expensive anticancer drug (EACD), and many would be prepared to pay for it even if they could not afford to, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Several Factors Affect Risk of Crashes in Teenage Drivers

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Parenting styles and primary access to vehicles significantly affects crash risks in teen drivers, according to two studies published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract - Ginsburg
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Abstract - Garcia-Espana
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Medication Usage Differs Among Hispanic Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In Hispanic children, acculturation differences affect medication usage, according to a study in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Abdominal Obesity May Affect Risks in Heart Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary heart disease, abdominal obesity independently predicts heart failure hospitalization and recurrent cardiovascular events, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Meningococcal Disease Jabs Should Be Repeated for Some

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- One dose of the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine may not be enough to confer ongoing protection, and vaccination should be repeated in those at high risk, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Socioeconomics Play Role in Prostate Cancer Mortality Odds

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients from low socioeconomic groups are more likely to die than their counterparts of high socioeconomic status, due to delayed diagnosis, poorer diagnostic methods and less invasive treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Prophylactic Mastectomy Rare Among High-Risk Women

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is relatively uncommon for women at high risk for breast cancer, but without diagnosed disease, to opt for prophylactic mastectomy, but women diagnosed with breast cancer are increasingly likely to undergo contralateral mastectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Parental Understanding of Growth Charts Is Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although pediatricians commonly share children's growth chart data with parents, many parents have a poor understanding of the data, according to a study in the October issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Test Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnostic test using cells from bronchoalveolar lavage is quick and effective in distinguishing active tuberculosis infection from latent infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis where the bacteria are undetectable in sputum, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Low Back Pain in Pregnancy a Major Health Issue in Iran

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) in pregnancy is an extremely common health problem in Iran, affecting more than 84 percent of women at some point in their pregnancies, according to a study in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Better Stove May Improve Women's Respiratory Health

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In rural Mexican women, use of an improved wood-burning stove is associated with better respiratory function compared to a traditional open fire, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Warns Prescribers About Tamiflu Dosing Errors

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Public Health Alert to notify pharmacists and prescribers about the potential for dosing errors with oseltamivir (Tamiflu for Oral Suspension).

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Lower Legal Drinking Age Linked to Later Problems

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who were able to legally purchase alcohol at younger ages may have a higher risk of recent alcohol or drug disorders, even decades later, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Abstract
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Meta-Analysis Finds Flu Linked to Heart Attack and Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease, getting influenza increases the risk of heart attack and death, and cardiac patients should be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated, according to a literature review and meta-analysis reported in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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Interventions Could Reduce Maternal Mortality in Africa

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Improved health facilities and greater access to misoprostol and antibiotics in the community could prevent thousands of maternal deaths in Africa annually, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Vitamin D Supplementation Helps Avert Melanoma Relapse

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent melanoma relapse and increase the chance that tumors will be thinner if relapse does occur, according to research published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Overweight Can Complicate Aneuploidy Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although body mass index does not affect the visual quality of nuchal translucency ultrasound tests, women with a higher body mass index take longer to complete the test and more need transvaginal ultrasound compared with normal weight women, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Alcohol Linked to Decreased Mortality After Head Injury

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with traumatic brain injuries who test positive for alcohol are less likely to die but more likely to have complications than patients who test negative, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Tanning May Put Very-Light-Skinned Youth at Higher Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Very-light-skinned children who tan develop more nevi than their counterparts who do not, which may indicate increased risk of developing melanoma when they are older, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology, while another study in the same issue recommends more states implement controls on youth access to tanning facilities.

Abstract - Aalborg
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Abstract - Pichon
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Pediatric Nurses Seldom Tackle Parents About Smoking

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric nurses are often in contact with smokers among the parents of their patients, but they seldom engage in smoking cessation activities with them, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
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Scoliosis Surgery Linked to Good Long-Term Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the long term, patients who receive surgical treatment for scoliosis are no more likely to develop low back pain or have an impaired quality of life than the general population, according to two studies in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Abstract
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Cognitive Testing Over Phone, in Person Found Similar

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Conducting neuropsychological tests by telephone may provide similar results as tests administered in person for assessing cognition in older woman, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Papers Look at Lung Cancer Factors in Never Smokers

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A guide to lung cancer in never smokers offers an overview of the disease, a description of the epidemiology and risk factors for lung cancer in those who have never smoked, and differences in molecular profiles between this group and smokers, as published in three papers in the Sept. 15 Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract - Samet
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Abstract - Rudin
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Abstract - Overview
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Color-Coded Charts Increase Parental Awareness of BMI

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric practices, color-coded charting may improve parental understanding of body mass index (BMI), according to a study in the September/October issue of Academic Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Study Finds Spanking in Low-Income Toddlers Detrimental

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal age and children's fussiness may be associated with spanking, which appears to be commonly used on toddlers in low-income families, and may have detrimental effects on the child's cognitive development, according to research published in the September/October issue of Child Development.

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U.K. Minorities More Likely to Fault Health Care Quality

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, ethnic minorities give all aspects of health care lower ratings than whites, in part because they may have different expectations, according to a study published Sept. 17 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Report Finds Adolescent Vaccine Coverage on the Rise

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent vaccine coverage increased in 2008 versus 2007, but further monitoring is needed to track the demographic factors affecting differences in coverage, according to a study in the Sept. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Sleep Aid May Lead to More Acid Reflux Exposure

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The sleep-inducing drug zolpidem may help patients with gastroesophageal reflux sleep through reflux events, increasing their acid exposure, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Most Pediatric Emergency Asthma Cases Not Followed Up

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In reference to children with asthma who are seen at a hospital emergency room, most cases are never followed up and the mother's education level is associated with odds of a child being taken for a check-up, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
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HPV Vaccination Acceptance Low in U.K. Minorities

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) is lower and there are more cultural barriers to acceptance of HPV vaccination among U.K. ethnic minorities than Caucasian women, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Gastric Bypass Patients Need Modified Nursing Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department nurses treating patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery need to adapt their routine methods of care to treat such patients safely, according to an article published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Studies Assess Intermittent Preventive Malaria Treatment

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi) against malaria using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine may be beneficial in a range of malaria-transmission settings, and IPTi with mefloquine may help protect infants from malaria in moderate-transmission areas, according to research from two studies set in Africa published online Sept. 17 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Aponte
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Abstract - Gosling
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Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Treatments for Acute Respiratory Failure Compared

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients suffering acute respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is superior to conventional ventilation support in terms of survival without disability, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Portion of Population at Low Cardio Risk Down Since 1999

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A modest increase in the portion of the U.S. population at low cardiovascular risk from 1971 to 1994 has reversed since 1999, pointing out the need for greater efforts at lifestyle modification and prevention, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Aerobic Exercise May Improve Arterial Function in Obese Men

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese middle-age men, habitual exercise may significantly increase central arterial distensibility according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Depression May Help Predict Mortality in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer patients, depression is associated with a statistically significant but relatively small increased risk of death, but it is not associated with an increased risk of disease progression, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Chlorinated Pools Linked to Problems in Atopic Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic adolescents who swim in chlorinated swimming pools may face a higher risk of asthma and respiratory allergies, according to research published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Opt-Out HIV Screening Well-Accepted by Adolescents

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A routine, opt-out screening process for HIV at a pediatric emergency department was well-accepted by adolescents and their guardians, according to research published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Waist-Hip Ratio Better Predictor of Seniors' Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In high-functioning older adults, waist-hip ratio is a more accurate predictor of all-cause mortality than either body mass index or waist circumference, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Epidemiology.

Abstract
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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

Abstract
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One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine May Offer Substantial Protection

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research indicates that just a single dose of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine can substantially increase protective antibodies, but vaccinations with seasonal flu vaccine provide minimal cross-reactive antibody response, according to several studies published online Sept. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Greenberg
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Abstract - Clark
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Abstract - Hancock
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Editorial

Mass Vaccination Could Mitigate Swine Flu Epidemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A swine flu epidemic could be greatly reduced by vaccinating 70 percent of the population, including children, high-risk groups, and health care and emergency services personnel, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Science.

Abstract
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Cardiology Work Force Crisis Looms as Cases Set to Rocket

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The cardiology work force will need to double by 2050 if it is to keep pace with the growing number of patients requiring specialist cardiology care, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and presented at an ACC media telebriefing earlier today.

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Kenyan Immunization May Reduce Sickle-Cell Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Sickle-cell anemia is more than 25 times more common in Kenyan children with bacterial infections, and immunization may prevent death since the bacterial species are the same as those in developed countries, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Neonatologists Need to Brush Up on Communication Skills

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although neonatologists graduate with a high degree of training in the technical skills they need, they typically lack adequate training in how to best communicate with families facing end-of-life decisions, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Compensation Status Doesn't Delay Canadians' Back Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In Canadian patients with sciatica from a herniated lumbar disc, compensation status has no effect on waiting times for elective surgical lumbar discectomy, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Guideline Reduces Antibiotics Usage, Adverse Drug Effects

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of lower respiratory tract infections, procalcitonin-based guidelines may lead to lower rates of antibiotic exposure and associated adverse effects without increasing adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Reducing Americans' Salt Intake Can Save Health Costs

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing a population's sodium consumption can result in health care savings due to lower incidence of hypertension and can also bring quality-of-life improvements, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Article

Many Children Receive Little Pain Relief After Surgery

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although most parents say that their children are in pain after surgery, many give them little or no pain relief, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics. In a related study in the same issue, nearly all families like being present for rounds in the pediatric intensive care unit, but on the first day of their child's admission, they often do not understand the plan and have privacy concerns.

Abstract - Fortier
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Abstract - Aronson
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Safety of Many Drugs During Breast-Feeding Unclear

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Only about two-thirds of psychotropic drugs can even be evaluated for their safety while breast-feeding, and only about a third of these can be judged as safe to use based on current evidence, according to a review published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Smoking Linked to Arrhythmia Recurrence in Women Only

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may be associated with a greater risk of atrial arrhythmia recurrence in women following cardioversion, and a higher risk of death in men, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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H1N1 Vaccines Appear Safe for Adults, Children

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The new H1N1 swine flu vaccine appears to be as safe as the seasonal flu variety, according to experts from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; and, intravenous use of the antiviral zanamivir (Relenza) may provide a lifesaving alternative for severe cases of H1N1 pneumonitis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in The Lancet.

More Information - Vaccines
The Lancet Case Report (subscription or payment may be required)

Adults Who Play Video Games May Experience Health Effects

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Playing video games is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) among men and more depression and poorer self-health perceptions among women in comparison with non-playing peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text
Editorial

Many Orthopedic Trials Do Not Adhere to Principle for Validity

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many orthopedic randomized clinical trials do not properly follow the intention-to-treat principle, potentially producing bias in trial results and analyses, according to a report in the Sept. 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Race Not Shown to Affect Liver Transplant Outcome

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant outcomes for patients with hepatitis B are similar regardless of whether the patient is Caucasian, Asian-American or African-American, according to a study in the September issue of Liver Transplantation.

Abstract
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Editorial

House Screens Key in Preventing Malaria Transmission

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Houses with screening have fewer mosquitoes indoors, which may help prevent malaria-related anemia in children, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Use Associated With More Physical Activity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink alcohol -- even heavily -- may be more likely to engage in physical activity, according to research published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Article

Carbon Monoxide Exposure Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease episodes in urban areas rise with same-day increases in the environmental level of carbon monoxide (CO), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Self-Care Help Needed for Heart Failure Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Acknowledging shortcomings of the health care system in promoting self-care for heart failure patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) has offered recommendations for clinicians and family members in a scientific statement published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

Full Text

Secondhand Smoke, Pollution Pose Cardiovascular Risks

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- While risks of cardiovascular mortality are greatest for active cigarette smokers, the relative risk for people exposed to secondhand smoke or air pollution is significant, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Childhood Sexual Behaviors Temporary, Normal

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual behavior by children is often normal and transient in nature, but clinicians need to be able to distinguish between age-appropriate sexual behaviors and those which may indicate problems in the child's environment, according to a clinical report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Aug. 31 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Top Hospitals Have Slightly Better Heart Failure Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitals ranked by the U.S. News & World Report as the best providers of heart care and surgery achieve better 30-day mortality rates than their non-ranked counterparts, readmission rates are similar regardless of ranking, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
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Smoking Linked to Higher Multiple Sclerosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers may face a higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis, but the risk increase may not be due to nicotine, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Neurologists Should Report Reactions to Flu Vaccine

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Neurologists should report any possible new cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome after immunization with the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine to health officials.

www.vaers.hhs.gov
CDC - H1N1 Update
American Academy of Neurology
The Brain Matters - Public Web Site

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