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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2009 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: October 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Test Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnostic test using cells from bronchoalveolar lavage is quick and effective in distinguishing active tuberculosis infection from latent infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis where the bacteria are undetectable in sputum, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Better Stove May Improve Women's Respiratory Health

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In rural Mexican women, use of an improved wood-burning stove is associated with better respiratory function compared to a traditional open fire, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Paradigm for Progress in Surgery Proposed

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a series of articles in the Sept. 26 issue of The Lancet, a cohort of surgical-thought leaders proposes a new paradigm for innovation, research, and evidence-based advancement in the field of surgery.

Abstract - Barkun
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Abstract - Ergina
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Abstract - McCulloch
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Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Meta-Analysis Finds Flu Linked to Heart Attack and Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease, getting influenza increases the risk of heart attack and death, and cardiac patients should be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated, according to a literature review and meta-analysis reported in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Intensive Care Patients Can Benefit From Physical Medicine

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to prevent neuromuscular complications after critical illness can begin in intensive care as soon as a patient is physiologically stabilized, according to a study in the October issue of Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Papers Look at Lung Cancer Factors in Never Smokers

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A guide to lung cancer in never smokers offers an overview of the disease, a description of the epidemiology and risk factors for lung cancer in those who have never smoked, and differences in molecular profiles between this group and smokers, as published in three papers in the Sept. 15 Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract - Samet
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Abstract - Rudin
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Abstract - Overview
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Hormone Replacement Linked to Lung Cancer Deaths

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with estrogen plus progestin in postmenopausal women is associated with higher death rates from lung cancer, according to a study published early online Sept. 20 in The Lancet to coincide with the European Cancer Organisation meeting in Berlin. In a related study published the same day in the The Lancet, researchers found that pemetrexed is effective maintenance therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

Abstract - Chlebowski
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Ciuleanu
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Report Finds Adolescent Vaccine Coverage on the Rise

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent vaccine coverage increased in 2008 versus 2007, but further monitoring is needed to track the demographic factors affecting differences in coverage, according to a study in the Sept. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Most Pediatric Emergency Asthma Cases Not Followed Up

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In reference to children with asthma who are seen at a hospital emergency room, most cases are never followed up and the mother's education level is associated with odds of a child being taken for a check-up, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
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SPDEF Tied to Overproduction of Mucus in Lung Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- SPDEF (SAM Pointed Domain Ets-like Factor) plays an important role in regulating a transcriptional network that induces pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and overproduction of mucus, according to research published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Guideline Adherence Can Improve Pneumonia Outcomes

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Adult and elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) achieve better outcomes when treated with empirical antimicrobial therapy in accordance with the 2007 professional guidelines for CAP, according to a pair of studies in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Arnold
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Abstract - McCabe
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Treatments for Acute Respiratory Failure Compared

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients suffering acute respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is superior to conventional ventilation support in terms of survival without disability, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Hispanic/Latino Community Has Unique Cancer Profile

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics and Latinos have a unique cancer profile that means they are less likely to get the four most common cancers, but are more likely to develop cancers related to infection, according to a report published Sept. 15 by the American Cancer Society.

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Report

FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Chlorinated Pools Linked to Problems in Atopic Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic adolescents who swim in chlorinated swimming pools may face a higher risk of asthma and respiratory allergies, according to research published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pneumothorax From Air Travel Rare Among Lung Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with interstitial lung diseases have only a slight risk of experiencing pneumothorax as the result of traveling by air or land, according to a study in the September issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Current Health Policy May Not Serve Young People Well

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A high proportion of deaths in young people worldwide are due to intentional and unintentional injury, and the current adolescent health policy focus on HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality is not enough to prevent mortality amongst youngsters, according to a study in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

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S. pneumoniae Leads to Death in Many Under 5

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 11 percent of all deaths in children aged 1 to 59 months are due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and greater efforts to prevent and treat disease associated with the bacterium could help attain the United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine May Offer Substantial Protection

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research indicates that just a single dose of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine can substantially increase protective antibodies, but vaccinations with seasonal flu vaccine provide minimal cross-reactive antibody response, according to several studies published online Sept. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Greenberg
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Abstract - Clark
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Abstract - Hancock
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Editorial

Statins May Offer Improved Outcomes for COPD Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Statins appear to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but more interventional trials are needed to specifically assess the drugs' effect on relevant COPD outcomes, according to a literature review in the Sept. 1 issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Most Chronic Coughs in Kids From Allergy, Asthma or Reflux

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The great majority of chronic coughs without obvious cause among pediatric patients are from allergies, asthma or gastroesophageal reflux disease, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Chest.

Abstract
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In-Hospital Pediatric Diagnosis of VTE Up 70 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Yearly pediatric hospital cases of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have risen 70 percent in this decade, with many children having coexisting chronic conditions, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Early Day Care May Not Protect Against Childhood Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Although early exposure to day care causes an increase in airway symptoms, it does not confer any additional protection against asthma in later childhood, according to a study published in the September 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Gene Linked to Cystic Fibrosis With Liver Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The SERPINA1 Z allele is associated with severe liver disease with portal hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis (CFLD), according to a study in the Sept. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Guideline Reduces Antibiotics Usage, Adverse Drug Effects

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of lower respiratory tract infections, procalcitonin-based guidelines may lead to lower rates of antibiotic exposure and associated adverse effects without increasing adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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H1N1 Vaccines Appear Safe for Adults, Children

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The new H1N1 swine flu vaccine appears to be as safe as the seasonal flu variety, according to experts from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; and, intravenous use of the antiviral zanamivir (Relenza) may provide a lifesaving alternative for severe cases of H1N1 pneumonitis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in The Lancet.

More Information - Vaccines
The Lancet Case Report (subscription or payment may be required)

RSV Infection Has Different Effect Throughout Airways

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of bronchial cells induces transcript and protein overexpression of nerve growth factor, which may protect the cells against virus-induced apoptosis, but the same does not occur in nasal and tracheal cells, according to research published online July 31 in PLoS One.

Abstract
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Diagnoses, Health Costs Rise in Partners of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use increases in partners of cancer patients following the cancer diagnosis, according to research published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Alcohol Use Associated With More Physical Activity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink alcohol -- even heavily -- may be more likely to engage in physical activity, according to research published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Article

Nadroparin May Prevent Blood Clots During Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced solid cancer, nadroparin may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

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