Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Hematology | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pathology | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Technique May Aid Detection of Residual Leukemia

Last Updated: October 07, 2009.

 

Tagging leukemia cells with magnetic particles allows them to be preferentially sampled

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A technique that tags leukemia cells using antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles and allows them to be preferentially sampled greatly increases the ability to detect residual disease, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A technique that tags leukemia cells using antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles and allows them to be preferentially sampled greatly increases the ability to detect residual disease, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

Jason E. Jaetao, from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and colleagues tested the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) conjugated to an antibody against the acute leukemia antigen CD34, followed by a magnetic needle biopsy to preferentially collect the charged leukemia cells, to help detect residual leukemias using leukemia cells producing various amounts of CD34.

Using three different methods to assess cell sampling, the researchers found that the antibody-conjugated SPIONs preferentially bound leukemias producing high levels of CD34. The technique was able to detect leukemia cells diluted into normal blood at levels lower than those normally found in remission bone marrow samples, as well as increase the detection of lymphoblasts in undiluted bone marrow by 10-fold.

"These data suggest that bone marrow biopsy using antigen-targeted magnetic nanoparticles and a magnetic needle for the evaluation of minimal residual disease in CD34-positive acute leukemias can significantly enhance sensitivity compared with the current standard of care," Jaetao and colleagues conclude.

Several authors are employees of Chemicell or Senior Scientific L.L.C., and one author has an equity interest in two companies developing magnetic resonance-based biosensing technologies.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Midlife Vision Linked to Early Childhood Factors Next: Wrist Fractures Less Likely Evaluated for Osteoporosis

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.