Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Gynecology | Hematology | Internal Medicine | Pathology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Role of Blood Transfusions for Bleed Complications Studied

Last Updated: October 16, 2009.

 

Outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention likely unchanged with transfusion

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Blood transfusions used for the treatment of hematocrit level drops due to bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention do not result in improved mortality or myocardial infarction outcomes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Blood transfusions used for the treatment of hematocrit level drops due to bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) do not result in improved mortality or myocardial infarction outcomes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Gabriel Maluenda, M.D., of the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C., and colleagues studied a cohort of 625 patients who underwent PCI from 2003 to 2007, whose hematocrit was between 24 and 30 percent, and of whom 189 received transfusions and 436 did not. Study outcomes of death or myocardial infarction were compared at 30 days and one year.

The researchers found that the mean hematocrit decrease was greater in the patients receiving transfusions (13.23 versus 2.99 percent), as was the incidence of myocardial infarction at initial presentation (30.7 versus 14 percent) and cardiogenic shock (25.4 versus 8.1 percent). The occurrence of death and myocardial infarction was more frequent in the patients receiving transfusions at 30 days (14.8 versus 7.1 percent) and one year (28.6 versus 19.6 percent), but following adjustment for comorbidities and the mean hematocrit decrease, the 30-day and one-year outcome for the patients receiving transfusions were no longer worse than those not transfused.

"In conclusion, our data do not support the routine use of transfusion in patients who present with a nadir hematocrit of 24 to 30 percent after PCI," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Coronary Angiography Found Safe in Chronic Kidney Disease Next: Morbidity Reduced for People Who Have Nearby Green Space

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.