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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2009 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: November 02, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Working After Retirement Associated With Better Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Retirees who engage in bridge employment tend to have better health than those who cease work completely, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

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Toronto Acute Stroke Protocol Increases Timely Thrombolysis

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- An acute stroke treatment protocol in which patients were taken directly to a regional stroke center instead of the closest local hospital resulted in a six-fold increase in the number of patients receiving tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 2.5 hours of symptom onset over a four-month study period, according to a report published online Oct. 29 in Stroke.

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Additional Recommendations for Imaging on the Rise

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for additional imaging in radiology reports at one institution increased steeply in recent years, and from 1980 to 2006, radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures increased roughly 10-fold and 2.5 fold, respectively, according to two studies the November issue of Radiology.

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ACE Inhibitors May Negatively Impact CABG Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The preoperative use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) may increase risk of mortality and other adverse outcomes, according to research published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Overweight Patients May Have Effect on Doctor's Attitude

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have lower respect for patients with high body mass index (BMI), which may have an impact on patient care and outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Link Between Nicotinic Acid and Atherosclerosis Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and atherosclerotic disease, daily use of high-dose nicotinic acid may help reduce atherosclerosis, according to research completed in the United Kingdom and published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Migraine With Aura Linked to Risk of Ischemic Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- People who have migraine headache with aura are at increased risk for ischemic stroke, particularly women, according to a meta-analysis of research on the links between migraines and cardiovascular disease published online Oct. 27 in BMJ.

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Importance of ST-Segment Resolution Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), ST-segment resolution at four hours after treatment may predict outcomes after fibrinolysis, but has limited prognostic value after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), according to the DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 (DANAMI-2) substudy published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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'Good' Cholesterol Levels May Boost Lipid Therapy Benefits

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- One of the key determinants of successfully preventing cardiovascular events with lipid therapy is raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Clinicians Adhering More to Quality Improvement Program

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that are participants in the "Get With The Guidelines" program are showing improvements in adherence over time for both men and women as well as younger and older patients, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Hormone Deficiency Shown to Impair Heart Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of adiponectin, an adipose-derived plasma protein that exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertrophic effects, in aldosterone-induced hypertension worsens left ventricular hypertrophy and heart function in mice, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Endocrinology.

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Antipsychotic Drugs Can Cause Pediatric Weight Gain

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The second generation of antipsychotic mediations cause weight gain and adverse changes in lipid and metabolic parameters, according to a study in the Oct. 28 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Noncardiovascular Deaths Add to Dialysis Patient Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High overall death rates among patients beginning dialysis are not just the result of higher cardiovascular death rates, but of significantly higher noncardiovascular death rates as well, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Venous Thromboembolism Risk Varies With Body Type

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is a positive, dose-dependent association between risk of venous thromboembolism and all the measurements of obesity, such as waist and hip circumference, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Circulation.

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Gender Gap in Midlife Heart Disease Risk Is Narrowing

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of midlife myocardial infarction is increasing for women, and vascular risk factor prevention should be given a higher priority, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Decline in Cardiorespiratory Fitness Speeds Up After 45

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Aging does not necessarily spell a linear decline in cardiorespiratory fitness, with lifestyle factors playing an important role, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Alteplase Effective for Stroke Even After Three-Hour Window

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The tissue plasminogen activator alteplase leads to better outcomes in stroke patients even when administered more than three hours after onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in The Lancet Neurology.

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H1N1 Can Be Particular Threat to Transplant Recipients

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiothoracic surgeons should be vigilant for signs of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus among their patients as the flu season approaches, and aggressively treat any cases, according to an article published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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Cocoa Can Reduce Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, cocoa may significantly decrease levels of some inflammatory biomarkers, suggesting that the flavonoids in cocoa may help protect against atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Hypertension and Cardiac Link During Pregnancy Analyzed

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are at higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, particularly if the hypertension is recurrent, according to a Norwegian study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Liraglutide Beneficial for Non-Diabetic Obese Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In non-diabetic obese patients, treatment with liraglutide may significantly reduce weight, blood pressure, and symptoms of pre-diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in The Lancet.

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Statins Not Associated With Surgical Site Infections

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients who undergo elective surgery, statin use is not associated with an increased or decreased risk of surgical site infection, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Review Evaluates Systems of Care for STEMI Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In Europe and North America, improvements in systems of care may improve outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a state-of-the-art paper published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Levels of Cardiac Troponin T Linked to Heart Failure Events

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) are associated with increased risk of events for patients with stable heart failure, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Remote Patient Monitoring May Lower Heart Failure Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients whose status was checked regularly using remote patient monitoring (RPM), had reduced risk of death and hospitalization compared to patients who received usual standard of care, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pulmonary Embolism Found to Be Often Unrelated to DVT

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with pulmonary embolism, only a few have deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the pelvic or proximal lower extremity veins, suggesting that pulmonary embolism originates in the lungs, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Causes of Heart Failure Patient Rehospitalizations Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most of the hospitalizations of heart failure patients subsequent to their diagnosis are for non-cardiovascular conditions, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Heart Attack Outcomes May Be Better With On-Site Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) have better outcomes if they present to a hospital with on-site cardiac surgery, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Diabetes May Not Influence Heart Disease Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes mellitus does not affect outcomes in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis treated with drug-eluting stents or coronary artery bypass, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Most H1N1 Hospitalizations Are in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of hospitalizations for H1N1 influenza are occurring in people younger than 25 years of age, and very few are occurring in the elderly, according to information presented at the Oct. 20 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Hip Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of hip fracture is much higher for people who have a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study among Swedish twins reported in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Aldosterone Antagonists May Be Underused in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many heart failure patients are not receiving aldosterone antagonist therapy, though they may be candidates for it under professional prescribing guidelines, according to a study in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Omega-3 Augmentation of Antidepressant Evaluated

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Giving omega-3 fatty acids along with sertraline to patients with depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) did not augment the effect of the antidepressant, according to a study in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Role of Antihypertensives in Stable Heart Disease Studied

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stable ischemic heart disease and preserved ventricular function may benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

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High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein May Predict Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In stroke-free middle-aged and older people, higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with a modestly increased risk of heart attack and death, but are not associated with an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of Neurology.

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Smoking Linked to Sperm Harm in Men With Varicocele

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men with varicocele, smoking more than 10 cigarettes daily was associated with a harmful effect on sperm motility and morphology, according to research published in the October issue of Urology.

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Health Effects of Air Pollution on Obese People Studied

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The health impact of fine particulate matter appears to be worse for obese people than their normal-weight counterparts, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Partner's Education Linked to Death Risk of Both in Couple

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among married or cohabiting couples, women's education and men's social class appear to have an important effect on the mortality risk of both partners, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Fish Oil Deemed Safe for Antiplatelet Therapy Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cardiovascular disease, the bleeding risk is not increased when high-dose fish oil is combined with aspirin and clopidogrel, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Role of Blood Transfusions for Bleed Complications Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Blood transfusions used for the treatment of hematocrit level drops due to bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) do not result in improved mortality or myocardial infarction outcomes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Coronary Angiography Found Safe in Chronic Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Screening coronary angiography does not reduce renal function in high-risk patients with advanced chronic kidney disease awaiting a kidney transplant, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Optimal Medical Therapy Alone Feasible for Heart Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary disease, an initial strategy of optimal medical therapy alone does not increase the risk of death or heart attack; however, a high rate of such patients ultimately will require revascularization, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Excess Weight's Role in Sleep-Disordered Breathing Studied

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Excess body weight may serve as a potentially important predictor of oxygen desaturation severity during sleep disturbances caused by apneas or hypopneas, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Intervention May Benefit Trial-Ineligible Heart Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who are usually excluded from randomized controlled trials, primary percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with a lower rate of in-hospital death than thrombolytic therapy, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Smoking Bans May Reduce Heart Attacks in Nonsmokers

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans may effectively reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attacks attributable to secondhand smoke, according to a report released Oct. 15 by the Institute of Medicine.

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Study Links Text Messages and E-mails to Smoking Cessation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- While short-term text message mobile phone interventions have been effective, further research needs to be completed to determine whether messages sent over mobile phones can help individuals with smoking cessation over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Podcasts May Help in Weight Loss Battle

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Using a social cognitive theory-based podcast can help overweight people lose weight, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Second-Line Diuretics in Hypertension Reviewed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of diuretics as a second-line approach to another anti-hypertensive agent further lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressure, providing the same effect as when used as first-line monotherapy, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Hospital Resource Use Variations Affect Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients with heart failure, variations in hospital resource use have a significant effect on outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Endovascular Aneurysm Repair May Reduce Early Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) reduced procedure time, hospital stay, and early postoperative mortality compared to open surgery, according to a study in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gene Variant Linked to Statin-Induced Side Effects

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women and those with a variant of a liver-metabolizing enzyme have a higher risk of mild statin-associated side effects, particularly those associated with simvastatin, according to a study in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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Early AMD May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may be at higher risk of coronary heart disease, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study published in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Lifestyle Counseling May Help Obese With Weight Loss

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle counseling from a clinical practitioner targeting prevention of weight gain may help overweight and obese individuals lose or maintain their weight, according to the results of a Dutch randomized control trial published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Suppressing Kinase Activity May Slow Cardiac Aging

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity in genetically-altered mice preserves cardiac function and prevents the appearance of other markers of cardiac aging, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Circulation.

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Preoperative Biomarker Levels May Predict Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high preoperative levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be at a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery, according to a systematic review published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Survey Assesses Management of Liver Transplant Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatologists overwhelmingly agree that primary care physicians should play a more active part in the management of common metabolic complications in liver transplant patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Atypical β-Blocker May Improve Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Nebivolol, a third generation β-blocker that has recently become available in the United States, offers a treatment alternative for hypertension, coronary artery disease and heart failure that goes beyond simple adrenergic blocking with direct vasodilation and stimulatory effects to improve arterial endothelial function, according to a paper in the Oct. 13 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Evidence Scant on Effects of Exercise After Stroke

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise training that involves walking may improve walking ability in individuals following a stroke, but the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness training on death and disability remain unclear, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Organ Donor Family Consent Request Protocols Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Organ donation using collaborative requesting instead of routine requesting by a patient's clinician may not provide increases in consent rates, according to an unblinded, multi-center, randomized controlled trial performed in the United Kingdom published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Herpes Zoster Infection May Increase Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke is higher in people who have had a herpes zoster infection than in those with no history of the disease, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Stroke.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Underused but Beneficial

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac rehabilitation, a medically supervised program to help heart patients recover and improve their functioning, is often not seen as an important component of comprehensive cardiac care and is underused, studies have shown clear benefits, according to a review published online Oct. 8 in Heart.

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Study Explores Thrombus Healing by Plaque Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Thrombus healing in sudden cardiac death victims may depend on the presence of plaque ruptures or erosions, and, in some patients, call for different treatment approaches, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Effect of H1N1 on Southern Hemisphere ICUs Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- During the winter of 2009 in Australia and New Zealand, the H1N1 flu virus had a significant effect on hospital intensive care units, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACS Education May Not Reduce Prehospital Delay

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), educational and counseling intervention may not lead to decreased hospital arrival times or increased emergency medical services (EMS) use after the onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Protects Somewhat Against A/H1N1

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There are early signs that the 2008/2009 trivalent inactivated seasonal flu vaccination offers some protection against influenza A/H1N1, particularly in its most severe forms, but this should not be taken to mean that vaccination against swine flu is superfluous, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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More Elderly Might Benefit From Stroke Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Given an aging population, the prevention and treatment of stroke in the very elderly -- who are under-represented in studies regarding therapy -- will become more important, according to research published online Oct. 2 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Model Can Predict Likelihood of Acute Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A mathematical model that considers clinical variables and levels of a biomarker can predict the likelihood of heart failure, particularly in patients judged as having intermediate probability, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Medication Errors in Nursing Home Residents Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, more than two-thirds of nursing home residents may be exposed to medication errors, according to a study in the October issue of Quality and Safety in Health Care.

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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Study Reports Lacking Benefit of ICD Early After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) does not reduce the risk of death when given to high-risk patients within a month after a heart attack, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

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Effectiveness and Cost Help to Make Coverage Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Countries using evidence-based cost-effectiveness and effectiveness to help make drug coverage decisions show how these factors can successfully support decision making and can also be adapted to the specific conditions of other countries, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Premature Death in China Linked to Hypertension

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated blood pressure is one of the leading preventable risk factors for premature death in China, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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Non-Cardiac Incidental Results Rarely Clinically Significant

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Non-cardiac findings found by cardiac computed tomography (CT) are usually not clinically significant and have no impact on death rates, but can lead to complications and add to health care costs, according to a study in the Oct. 13 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Novel Risk Factors Not Found Useful for Heart Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- After a systematic review of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) finds there is insufficient evidence to support the use of any of nine novel risk factors in the routine screening of patients for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Oct. 6 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Expanded Health Coverage Could Save Money Later

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding health coverage to adults may result in later savings from reduced Medicare spending on these individuals after they turn 65, especially for the uninsured with cardiovascular disease, diabetes or severe arthritis, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Mercury Linked to High Blood Pressure in Native Canadians

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- High exposure to environmental mercury in Canadian Inuits, which is due to their traditional diet of fish, is associated with high blood pressure, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Hypertension.

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Appetite Hormone May Affect Peripheral Fat Metabolism

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When administered directly into the brain, the appetite hormone ghrelin regulates peripheral fat metabolism largely independently of growth hormone, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Nicotine Replacement in Pregnant Smokers Likely Safe

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine replacement therapy does not increase the risk of adverse events in pregnant smokers, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Cardiovascular Risk Factors Studied in Ex-Football Players

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to community controls, retired National Football League (NFL) players have significantly fewer cardiovascular risk factors; but, they have a similar prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Heroin, Crack Treatment Often Successful in Short Term

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heroin and crack cocaine addiction can be successfully treated in the short term with either pharmacological or psychosocial methods, but treatments are less successful in those with addictions to both drugs, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in The Lancet.

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Resynchronization Can Slow Heart Failure Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves clinical outcomes, as well as left ventricular function and size, in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Use of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Increasing

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The use of endovascular repair (EVAR) has increased over open repair (OAR) for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) during this decade in the United States, which is associated with better outcomes, according to a study in the October Journal of Vascular Surgery.

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Rising Numbers of Elderly Will Pose Issues for Nations

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- An anticipated rise in life expectancy, involving more than half of babies born in wealthy nations living to 100, will cause societal and economic challenges in coming decades, according to research published in the Oct. 3 issue of The Lancet.

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High-Status Children More Likely to Be Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with the highest status among their peers are at lower risk for disease in adulthood, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Kidney Disease Risk May Be Higher in Allergic Diabetics

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In male diabetics, there is a correlation between eosinophil counts and microalbuminuria that may point to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease in those with allergic rhinitis or asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Early Presentation Remains Uncommon in Stroke Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Between 2001 and 2004, there was no change in the proportion of stroke patients who arrived at academic medical centers within two hours of symptom onset. However, usage of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) in such patients increased, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Stroke.

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