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Category: Orthopedics | Monthly Briefing

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October 2009 Briefing - Orthopedics

Last Updated: November 02, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Tai Chi Can Improve Pain and Function in Knee Arthritis

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The ancient Chinese exercise practice Tai Chi can reduce pain, preserve functionality, and improve personal well-being among subjects with knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Additional Recommendations for Imaging on the Rise

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for additional imaging in radiology reports at one institution increased steeply in recent years, and from 1980 to 2006, radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures increased roughly 10-fold and 2.5 fold, respectively, according to two studies the November issue of Radiology.

Abstract - Sistrom
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Abstract - Mettler
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Pain Among Men and Women War Veterans Evaluated

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Among veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), women have a lower prevalence of overall pain, moderate-severe pain, and persistent pain compared to men, according to a study in the October issue of Pain Medicine.

Abstract
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Overweight Patients May Have Effect on Doctor's Attitude

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have lower respect for patients with high body mass index (BMI), which may have an impact on patient care and outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Neonatal Aluminum Exposure May Affect Later Bone Health

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm infants who are exposed to parenteral aluminum may have an increased risk of reduced lumbar spine and hip bone mass during adolescence, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Article Reviews Techniques for Idiopathic Clubfoot Correction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The techniques for performing the Ponseti and French functional methods of treating idiopathic clubfeet were the focus of an article in a supplement to the October Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Pulmonary Embolism Found to Be Often Unrelated to DVT

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with pulmonary embolism, only a few have deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the pelvic or proximal lower extremity veins, suggesting that pulmonary embolism originates in the lungs, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Supervised Exercise Found Helpful in Treating Knee Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A program of supervised exercise is more effective than usual care in treating patellofemoral pain syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in BMJ.

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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Hip Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of hip fracture is much higher for people who have a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study among Swedish twins reported in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

Abstract
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Review Discusses Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy Procedure

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The surgical technique for tendon transfers to the rotator cuff and open glenohumeral reduction in patients with joint deformity from brachial plexus birth palsy is discussed in an article in the Oct. 1 supplement to the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Article Reviews Technique for Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cervical disc arthroplasty -- which research has suggested is equivalent to arthrodesis for cervical myelopathy with single-level abnormalities in the disc space -- is the focus of a surgical technique article in a supplement to the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Electrical Stimulation Not Linked to Better Spinal Fusion

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Electrical stimulation following spinal fusion surgery wasn't effective in improving fusion rates in older patients, but was associated with a tendency toward better functional outcome, according to two articles published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract - Part 1
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Abstract - Part 2
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Lumbar Spondylolysis Rate Is 6 Percent in Japanese

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of lumbar spondylolysis, a crack in the lumbar vertebrae often caused by repeated stress, is about 6 percent in the Japanese, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Corticosteroid Shot Helpful in Post-Pregnancy Back Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Corticosteroid injections in the ischial spine can help relieve long-standing sacral low back pain that begins during pregnancy, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Serious Pathology Uncommon in Low Back Pain Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients presenting to primary care settings with acute low back pain, previously undiagnosed serious spinal pathology is rare, and commonly asked "red flag" screening questions may not identify it, according to a study in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Pronation and Supination Compared for Pulled Elbow

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of children with pulled elbow, limited evidence suggests that pronation may be a more effective and less painful manipulative intervention than the standard supination method, according to an review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract

Study Finds Exercise Reduces Bone Loss During Lactation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Lactating women who participate in a resistance and aerobic exercise program may experience less bone loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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Cytokines Linked to Knee Pain With Meniscal Injury

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Several inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the pain that develops following meniscal injuries in the knee, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Organ Donor Family Consent Request Protocols Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Organ donation using collaborative requesting instead of routine requesting by a patient's clinician may not provide increases in consent rates, according to an unblinded, multi-center, randomized controlled trial performed in the United Kingdom published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Study Supports Surgery for Osgood-Schlatter Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease in young adults typically results in excellent or good functional outcomes, with rare reoperations, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Roundtable
Perspective - Cutler

Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

Abstract
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Many Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Recover Within a Year

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to common wisdom that patients with chronic low back pain can rarely recover, one-third of patients will recover in nine months, and four in 10 patients will recover within a year, according to a study published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Wrist Fractures Less Likely Evaluated for Osteoporosis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Osteoporosis evaluation and management is less common in patients with wrist fractures than in those with hip and spine fractures, according to a national Korean cohort study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Effectiveness and Cost Help to Make Coverage Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Countries using evidence-based cost-effectiveness and effectiveness to help make drug coverage decisions show how these factors can successfully support decision making and can also be adapted to the specific conditions of other countries, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Expanded Health Coverage Could Save Money Later

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding health coverage to adults may result in later savings from reduced Medicare spending on these individuals after they turn 65, especially for the uninsured with cardiovascular disease, diabetes or severe arthritis, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions Increasing

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- During the period of 1997 to 2006, the rate of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction significantly increased, and subsequent knee surgery was required more often among younger patients and those treated by a lower-volume surgeon or at a lower-volume hospital, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Sports Medicine Increasing

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is being increasingly used in sports medicine, even though minimal clinical evidence exists that it can enhance healing, according to a review in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Abstract
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Prevalence of Alcohol as Self-Medication for Pain Assessed

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of alcohol as a self-management strategy for orofacial pain and arthritis raises concerns about potential interactions between alcohol and pain medications, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Vitamin D Can Help Reduce Falls in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation of between 700 and 1,000 IU can significantly reduce the risk of falls in older adults, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Surgical Masks Found to Be Non-Inferior to Respirators

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical masks may be no less effective than N95 respirators in preventing influenza in health care workers, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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CDC Says States Not Meeting Fruit and Veggie Objectives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a Sept. 29 press release, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says no U.S. state is currently meeting the national Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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Risk of Foot Pain Associated With Footwear Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women who wear shoes that are of suboptimal design for feet are significantly more likely to report hindfoot pain than those who wear good shoes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Physicians May Fail to Act on Electronic Alerts Quickly

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians using a system with electronic medical records and computerized alerts may not acknowledge or act upon critical imaging results in a timely manner, according to research published in the Sept. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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