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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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October 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: November 02, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Uninsured Children May Be More Likely to Die in the Hospital

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In-hospital all-cause mortality is higher among uninsured children than among those who have insurance, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
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Disability Rates Similar in Foreign, Domestic Adoptees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children adopted from other countries had similar rates of disability as domestically adopted children, though these rates were much higher than in the general population of children, according to research published in the November issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Swine Flu Radiographic and CT Imaging Patterns Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in one or both lungs with consolidation are the most common computed radiographic (CR) and computed tomography (CT) images of patients with swine-origin influenza A (S-OIV), according to a study to be published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Additional Recommendations for Imaging on the Rise

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for additional imaging in radiology reports at one institution increased steeply in recent years, and from 1980 to 2006, radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures increased roughly 10-fold and 2.5 fold, respectively, according to two studies the November issue of Radiology.

Abstract - Sistrom
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Abstract - Mettler
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Vitamin D Deficiency Found Common in American Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Suboptimal levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) are common in American children, especially non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican-Americans, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Antibiotic Prophylaxis May Halt UTI Recurrence in Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In children with recurrent urinary tract infections, low-dose, continuous oral antibiotic therapy may help prevent future recurrences, according to an Australian study in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Genetic Mutation Linked to Severe Candidasis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired dectin-1 signaling may be responsible for severe mucocutaneous fungal infections, according to two reports published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Ferwerda
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Abstract - Glocker
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Impact of Childhood Sleep Patterns on Obesity Evaluated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In children, getting more sleep on weekends and holidays may reduce the risk of overweight or obesity associated with reduced sleep during weekdays, according to a Chinese study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Antipsychotic Drugs Can Cause Pediatric Weight Gain

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The second generation of antipsychotic mediations cause weight gain and adverse changes in lipid and metabolic parameters, according to a study in the Oct. 28 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Rising Down's Syndrome Trend as Maternal Age Increases

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although there has been an increase in the incidence of Down's syndrome in the United Kingdom since 1989, improved screening has offset the rise and the number of Down's syndrome births has slightly declined, according to a study published Oct. 26 in BMJ.

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Neonatal Aluminum Exposure May Affect Later Bone Health

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm infants who are exposed to parenteral aluminum may have an increased risk of reduced lumbar spine and hip bone mass during adolescence, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise in Inherited Sight Disorder

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Gene therapy for a rare inherited sight disorder in which severely impaired vision in childhood usually results in blindness in adulthood can substantially improve vision, particularly in children, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Far Fewer H1N1 Vaccine Doses Than Expected Are Available

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of production delays, far fewer than the goal of 40 million doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine will be available in the United States by the end of October, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for the investigational antiviral drug peramivir intravenous in certain patients with suspected or confirmed H1N1 infection.

More Information - CDC
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Broad Asthma Screening May Offer Minimal Health Gains

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The potential health benefits from asthma screenings in children seem to be smaller than previously expected, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Dutch Trial Does Not Appear to Sway View on Tonsil Surgery

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A 2004 trial finding equal benefits from adenotonsillectomy and watchful waiting in children moderately affected by throat infections or adenotonsillar enlargement had little effect on Dutch doctors' beliefs regarding the surgery, and tonsillectomy can treat vocal nasalance, according to two studies in the October Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract - Rovers
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Abstract - Subramaniam
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Childhood-Cancer Survivors at Risk of Suicidal Thoughts

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood cancers are more likely to have thoughts of suicide, particularly if they are in poor mental and physical health, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Pediatric Post-Tonsillectomy Antibiotic Courses Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric tonsillectomy patients who received three days of postoperative antibiotics needed no more pain medication and resumed normal activity as soon as patients who received a seven-day course, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Article Reviews Techniques for Idiopathic Clubfoot Correction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The techniques for performing the Ponseti and French functional methods of treating idiopathic clubfeet were the focus of an article in a supplement to the October Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Pregnancy Weight Gain Can Affect Subsequent Retention

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who gain excessive amounts of weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of retaining weight at one-year postpartum, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Cisplatin Alone Effective in Children With Hepatoblastoma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cisplatin alone is just as effective as, but less toxic than, cisplatin plus doxorubicin in children with standard-risk hepatoblastoma, according to a study in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Novel H1N1 Vaccine Found Effective for Most Age Groups

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A new influenza A (H1N1) vaccine developed in China successfully generated a protective immune response in subjects ranging in age from 12 to 60 years, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Intensity Kidney Therapies Show Mixed Results

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In critically ill adults with acute renal injury, higher-intensity renal-replacement therapy does not reduce mortality; however, in children with chronic kidney disease, higher-intensity blood-pressure control has beneficial effects on renal function, according to two studies in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Bellomo
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Abstract - Wühl
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Most H1N1 Hospitalizations Are in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of hospitalizations for H1N1 influenza are occurring in people younger than 25 years of age, and very few are occurring in the elderly, according to information presented at the Oct. 20 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Factors Contributing to Autism in Preterm Children Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The higher risk of autistic disorders related to premature birth may be largely due to higher rates of prenatal and neonatal complications, according to research completed in Sweden and published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Medical Resident Skin Cancer Exam Training Evaluated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students and residents do not get consistent access to training in how to conduct a skin cancer examination, and need more education on how to look for skin cancer during routine medical examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Childhood Hyperactivity Linked to Shortened Nighttime Sleep

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are not able to sleep through the night are more likely to be hyperactive, with the risk especially high for boys with adverse family living conditions, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Report Urges Nutritional Revamp for School Meals

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) - "School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children," a report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), recommends new nutritional targets and menu planning standards for the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, to better meet the nutritional needs of the nation's school children and foster healthy eating habits.

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Report - School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children

Effect of Microbicidal Wipes on Neonatal Sepsis Assessed

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Chlorhexidine vaginal and neonatal wipes are ineffective in preventing sepsis and bacterial colonization of newborns, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

Abstract
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Blood Mercury Not Found to Be Elevated in Autism

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Blood mercury levels are similar in children with autism or autism spectrum disorder (AU/ASD), non-autism developmental delays (DD) or typically developing (TD) controls, according to the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment study published online Oct. 19 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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HIV Vaccine Regimen Shows Modest Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine combination may decrease the risk of HIV infection in a community-based population that has a largely heterosexual risk, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the AIDS Vaccine Conference, held from Oct. 19 to 22 in Paris.

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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Harm in Young Smokers

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke brings increased risk of respiratory symptoms even in adolescents who smoke, and secondhand smoke exposure outside the home has dropped substantially for children since the early 1990s, according to two studies published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Lai
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Abstract - Marano
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Study Confirms Benefits of Belt-Positioning Booster Seats

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of belt-positioning booster seats in children reduces the risk of injury during a crash as compared to the use of standard seat belts, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Review Discusses Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy Procedure

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The surgical technique for tendon transfers to the rotator cuff and open glenohumeral reduction in patients with joint deformity from brachial plexus birth palsy is discussed in an article in the Oct. 1 supplement to the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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CDC Says New Child Deaths Raise H1N1 Beyond Epidemic

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- As of Oct.16, 11 more children in the United States had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, elevating the disease above epidemic proportions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 16 news conference.

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FDA Approves Vaccines for HPV-Related Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- On Oct. 16, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved two vaccines to prevent diseases related to human papillomavirus (HPV) in males and females.

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Paracetamol May Not Be Best for Infant Vaccinations

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Routine use of paracetamol to reduce febrile reactions due to vaccination of infants may not be an optimal approach, as the drug can also reduce the antibody response to several vaccine antigens, according to two consecutive randomized, controlled, open-label studies completed in the Czech Republic and published in the Oct. 17 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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HPV Vaccine's Effect on Genital Wart Rates Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a significant decline in the number of cases of genital warts since 2007 when Australia introduced vaccination against four strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) for girls aged 12 to 18 years and young women under the age of 26, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Abstract
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Morbidity Reduced for People Who Have Nearby Green Space

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Populations in areas with nearby green space tend to have a lower prevalence of common diseases and conditions, particularly depression and anxiety, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Abdominal Pain Common in Childhood, Adolescence

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Both children and adolescents frequently experience abdominal pain, and it is a common cause of a visit to the doctor, according to a study in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Action Urged to Reduce Global Diarrhea Deaths in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce the worldwide diarrhea death toll among children, the United Nations Children's Fund and the World Health Organization have issued a series of prevention and treatment recommendations and an urgent call-to-action, published online Oct. 14 in The Lancet.

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Study Looks at Enema Benefits in Constipated Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Regular enemas may not provide additional benefit to oral laxative regimens used in children with chronic and severe constipation, according to a randomized controlled trial completed in the Netherlands and published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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More Very Preterm Births Is Raising Retinopathy Incidence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing number of extremely preterm babies who are surviving is increasing the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Pronation and Supination Compared for Pulled Elbow

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of children with pulled elbow, limited evidence suggests that pronation may be a more effective and less painful manipulative intervention than the standard supination method, according to an review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract

Folic Acid Blockers May Increase Risk of Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs such as methotrexate and anti-epileptics that reduce folic acid levels during the first trimester of pregnancy more than double the risk of congenital abnormalities in the developing fetus, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Study Links Sleep Environment to Sudden Infant Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In England, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is associated with potentially hazardous co-sleeping environments, including sharing a bed or sofa with a parent who has recently consumed alcohol or narcotics, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Prenatal Drug Exposure Linked to Children's Later Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal substance exposure could lead to later behavioral problems in children through multiple pathways, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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H1N1 Has Made Many Young Adult Patients Critically Ill

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The 2009 influenza A(H1N1) outbreak has put many young adult patients in intensive care with severe respiratory disease, leading to a high fatality rate, according to three studies published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Kumar
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Abstract - Davies
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Abstract - Dominguez-Cherit
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Drugs for Malaria Prevention in Travelers Compared

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline appear to be relatively well-tolerated for malaria prophylaxis in travelers, and are less likely to cause neuropsychiatric effects than mefloquine, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
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Racial Disparities Persist in Prevalence of HIV Infection

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 years after the identification of HIV, the racial disparity between African-Americans and Caucasians in HIV prevalence has persisted despite massive governmental and private efforts to contain the AIDS epidemic, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Guided Imagery Program Can Help Ease Children's Belly Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a home-based guided imagery program to standard medical care was found to more effectively treat functional abdominal pain in children than medical care alone, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Text Message Alerts May Improve Drug Adherence

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A text messaging reminder service may help young people better adhere to their immunosuppressant regimen following liver transplantation, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Impact of Maternal Depression and Abuse on Children Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- When mothers have mental health problems or are victims of family abuse, it negatively impacts the care and health of their children, according to a pair of studies in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Conron
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Abstract - Asling-Monemi
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Oral Vaccine May Help Prevent Endemic Cholera

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- An inexpensive, locally-produced oral cholera vaccine may benefit populations threatened by endemic cholera, according to a double-blind Indian study published online Oct. 9 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Organ Donor Family Consent Request Protocols Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Organ donation using collaborative requesting instead of routine requesting by a patient's clinician may not provide increases in consent rates, according to an unblinded, multi-center, randomized controlled trial performed in the United Kingdom published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Chemical in Plastics Linked to Behaviors in Young Girls

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daughters born to women who were exposed in pregnancy to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resin, are more likely to exhibit aggressive and hyperactive behaviors as 2-year-olds, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
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Vaccinating Boys for HPV Is Not Found to Be Cost Effective

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating boys against human papillomavirus (HPV) exceeds value for money thresholds based on the information currently available, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Assesses Survival After Second Primary Neoplasms

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In survivors of childhood cancer, survival following second primary glioma is poor, though the outlook is good for second primary meningioma, according to research published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Cancer Survivorship Has Little Effect on Birth Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Most infants born to female and male survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are not at increased risk of overall complications, but may be at increased risk of preterm delivery or low birth weight, according to two studies published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Mueller
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Abstract - Chow
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Effect of H1N1 on Southern Hemisphere ICUs Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- During the winter of 2009 in Australia and New Zealand, the H1N1 flu virus had a significant effect on hospital intensive care units, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Survey Finds Asthma Control Poorer in Minority Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- African-American and Hispanic children were found to have more poorly controlled asthma than Caucasian children in a four-state sample from a national asthma survey, according to an analysis from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the October issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Protects Somewhat Against A/H1N1

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There are early signs that the 2008/2009 trivalent inactivated seasonal flu vaccination offers some protection against influenza A/H1N1, particularly in its most severe forms, but this should not be taken to mean that vaccination against swine flu is superfluous, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Doctor Attitude Affects Counsel on Emergency Contraception

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians who have less favorable attitudes toward abortion and teen sex are less likely to counsel their patients on emergency contraception and prescribe it in accordance with pediatric practice guidelines, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Food-Insecure Children Found More Likely to Be Overweight

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Girls in food-insecure households are more likely to be overweight than their counterparts from food-secure homes, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Childhood Trauma Linked to Premature Death

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple adverse childhood experiences such as abuse, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation or divorce, or growing up in a household where members are mentally ill, substance abusers, or sent to prison may be associated with premature death, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Roundtable
Perspective - Cutler

Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

Abstract
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Depression, Anxiety May Raise Odds of Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety and the risk of future obesity, according to a study published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Glioma Risk Associated With Youth Obesity and Inactivity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of glioma is greater among those who are tall and those who were inactive or obese in adolescence, suggesting a link between the cancer and early-life energy balance, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Technique May Aid Detection of Residual Leukemia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A technique that tags leukemia cells using antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles and allows them to be preferentially sampled greatly increases the ability to detect residual disease, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Mother's Use of Antidepressant May Carry Risks for Newborn

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns who have been exposed in utero to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) taken by their mothers are at higher risk for shorter gestational age, preterm delivery and admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, according to a study in the October Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Midlife Vision Linked to Early Childhood Factors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal, childhood biological and social determinants may contribute to midlife visual function, according to a study in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Bovine Lactoferrin May Help Prevent Sepsis in Preemies

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In very low birth weight infants, supplementation with bovine lactoferrin, either alone or in combination with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, may significantly reduce the risk of a first episode of late-onset sepsis, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Effectiveness and Cost Help to Make Coverage Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Countries using evidence-based cost-effectiveness and effectiveness to help make drug coverage decisions show how these factors can successfully support decision making and can also be adapted to the specific conditions of other countries, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Studies Examine Strategies Against Flu Pandemics

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating against H1N1 earlier this fall may save more money and avert more deaths than vaccinating later in the season, and expanded adjuvanted vaccination and antiviral prophylaxis could be beneficial in an influenza A (H5N1) pandemic, according to two studies published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Study 1
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Report Finds Invasive MRSA Infections on the Rise in Iowa

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Invasive community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an increasing public health threat in Iowa, according to a study in the October issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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New Guidelines Endorsed for Pediatric Hepatitis B

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations seek to improve the screening, monitoring, initial management, and referral of children with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a special article published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Nicotine Replacement in Pregnant Smokers Likely Safe

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine replacement therapy does not increase the risk of adverse events in pregnant smokers, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder May Affect 673,000 Children in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, the point-prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in children may be significantly higher than previously estimated, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Burns Often Send Children to the Emergency Room

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. emergency rooms treat more than 120,000 pediatric burn injuries each year, and children under 6 years of age may be especially likely to sustain serious injuries, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Smoking Adds to Social Inequalities in Stillbirth Rates

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy accounts for 38 percent of the social inequality in the rate of stillbirths, and 31 percent of infant death inequality, according to a study published online on Oct. 1 in BMJ.

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High-Status Children More Likely to Be Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with the highest status among their peers are at lower risk for disease in adulthood, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Food Habits Studied in Children of Working Parents

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers work full-time or part-time are more likely to have unhealthy eating habits compared to the offspring of stay-at-home mothers, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Surgical Masks Found to Be Non-Inferior to Respirators

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical masks may be no less effective than N95 respirators in preventing influenza in health care workers, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Strep Infections Not Linked to Neuropsychiatric Disorders

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In children, streptococcal infections do not appear to significantly affect the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Neurology.

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CDC Says States Not Meeting Fruit and Veggie Objectives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a Sept. 29 press release, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says no U.S. state is currently meeting the national Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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Prenatal Pandemic Flu May Increase Cardiovascular Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to the notoriously virulent 1918 pandemic flu increased the risk of cardiovascular disease and growth retardation later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.

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