Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Hematology | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Nephrology | Nursing | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Benefits, Risks of Darbepoetin Alfa in Diabetes Assessed

Last Updated: November 02, 2009.

 

Use in those with chronic kidney disease and anemia did not reduce mortality or renal disease

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
In patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and anemia, darbepoetin alfa does not reduce death, cardiovascular or renal events, and may be linked to an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and anemia, darbepoetin alfa does not reduce death, cardiovascular or renal events, and may be linked to an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Marc A. Pfeffer, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues randomly assigned 2,012 patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and anemia to darbepoetin alfa to achieve a 13 g per deciliter hemoglobin level and 2,026 patients to placebo, with rescue darbepoetin alfa administered for hemoglobin levels below 9 g per deciliter.

The researchers found that death or a cardiovascular event occurred in 632 patients administered darbepoetin alfa and 602 patients on placebo (hazard ratio, 1.05), while death or end-stage renal disease occurred in 652 patients on darbepoetin alfa and 618 on placebo (hazard ratio, 1.06). Stroke occurred in 101 patients on darbepoetin alfa and 53 on placebo (hazard ratio, 1.92). In addition, the researchers observed only a modest improvement in patient-reported fatigue in the darbepoetin alfa group.

"It is our view that, in many patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and moderate anemia who are not undergoing dialysis, the increased risk of stroke and possibly death among patients with a history of a malignant condition will outweigh any potential benefit of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent," the authors conclude.

The study was supported by Amgen; several authors reported financial and consulting relationships with Amgen and other pharmaceutical companies.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, October 17-21, 2009 Next: IDSA: Obesity May Affect CD4 Cell Counts in HIV Patients

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.