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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Arterial Duct Stenting Deemed Beneficial to Neonates

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonates with congenital heart disease with duct-dependent pulmonary circulation (CHD-DPC), percutaneous arterial duct stenting is as effective as the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt in fostering pulmonary artery growth, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cigarettes Teeming With Bacteria, Other Pathogens

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarettes contain more than a dozen different types of bacteria, as well as other harmful pathogens that could play a role in smokers' increased risk of infectious and chronic respiratory diseases, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Avoiding Work Conflict Linked to Poor Heart Outcomes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men who covertly cope with unfairness at work rather than directly confronting it may be at greater risk of heart attack or heart-related death, according to research published online Nov. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Efficacy of Revascularization Strategies Similar in Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In diabetic patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) plus stenting may be as effective as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), although the risk of repeat revascularization is higher with PCI, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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West Nile Virus Slipped Through Blood Screening Net

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- West Nile virus still poses a threat to organ transplant and blood product recipients, despite the introduction of nationwide screening, according to a report published in the Nov. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Microembolic Events Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Microemboli and microvascular obstruction are common in acute coronary thrombosis and sudden cardiac death, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Article Offers Overview on Diuretics for Hypertension

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Thiazide diuretics, commonly regarded by physicians as the diuretics of choice for long-term antihypertensive therapy, are the focus of a review article in the Nov. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Plasma Troponin T Level Linked to Heart Failure, Death

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Troponin T concentrations in blood plasma measured using a new and more sensitive assay process were found to be associated with cardiovascular death and heart failure among coronary artery disease patients, but not myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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High Salt Intake Can Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High salt consumption is associated with increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, and, given that average salt consumption in most Western countries is close to double the World Health Organization-recommended limit of 5 g a day, population-wide measures to control salt intake are warranted, according to a study published Nov. 24 in BMJ.

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Physician-Pharmacist Team Improves Hypertension Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Family practices in which pharmacists actively collaborated with physicians on blood pressure (BP) control medications achieved better BP control, and adhered to treatment guidelines better, than practices where pharmacists did not play an active role, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Delayed Treatment May Result in Irreversible Heart Damage

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who receive primary percutaneous coronary intervention, time to reperfusion is associated with the level of reversible and irreversible myocardial injury, including significantly reduced salvaged myocardium with increased time to reperfusion, according to a study the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Gingko Biloba May Not Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Twice daily doses of Gingko biloba did not show any benefit over placebo in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among elderly subjects in a study published online Nov. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Benefit of IV Drugs in Out-of-Hospital Resuscitation Studied

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous administration of drugs during out-of-hospital treatment for cardiac arrest does not improve the odds of survival, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Higher Volume of Angioplasty May Not Improve Outcomes

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The number of angioplasty procedures a hospital performs affects the median door-to-balloon time, and use of evidence-based treatments, but in-hospital mortality rates do not improve with higher volumes, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Psychoses May Increase Risk of Death From Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psychotic disorders are at higher risk of death from heart disease than people who do not have a mental disorder, according to a study in the November/December issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Consumer Advertising Drove Up Clopidogrel Cost, Not Usage

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of clopidogrel did not increase use of the medication, but did increase its unit cost and Medicaid pharmacy expenditures, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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How to Improve GI Surgery Mortality in the Elderly Studied

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients older than 75 years who undergo major gastrointestinal tract surgery have substantially higher morbidity -- including pulmonary and urologic complications -- and mortality than younger patients, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Rofecoxib Cardiovascular Risk Apparent in Late 2000

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Dozens of studies on rofecoxib revealed its association with an increased risk of cardiovascular events nearly three and a half years before it was voluntarily withdrawn by maker Merck and Company, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Remote Pacemaker Monitoring More Effective Than Standard

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Remote pacemaker monitoring is more effective than traditional transtelephonic monitoring (TTM), detecting clinical events more quickly and frequently, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Post-PCI Mortality Similar With Enoxaparin or Heparin

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, those receiving enoxaparin have similar one-year mortality rates compared to those receiving unfractionated heparin, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Left Ventricular Pacing Site Important in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In cardiomyopathy patients referred for implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device, the left ventricular (LV) pacing site primarily determines the hemodynamic response, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Efficacy of Transradial Catheterization Studied

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing coronary catheterization, transradial coronary angiography and angioplasty is as safe and effective as the transfemoral approach, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Sleep Apnea in Kidney Transplant Patients Assessed

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with kidney disease who underwent or are awaiting transplant is similar, but transplant recipients with the sleep disorder may be at higher risk for hypertension, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Alcohol Associated With Lower Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Men who drink alcohol are at lower risk of coronary heart disease than their non-drinking counterparts, according to a Spanish study published online Nov. 19 in Heart.

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Surgery Errors in Veterans Hospitals Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Errors during ophthalmologic and orthopedic surgeries were the most common found in a study of surgery errors occurring in veterans hospitals, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Hypertension Found Common in Pediatric Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children with chronic kidney disease often have high blood pressure, increasing their risk of left ventricular enlargement, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Heart Attack, Coronary Disease Treatment Guidelines Updated

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency care for heart attack patients requires a communitywide, coordinated response in order to deliver the best treatment, according to a report published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CPR Indicated in Pediatric Bradycardia, Poor Perfusion

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized pediatric patients who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for bradycardia and poor perfusion have a better chance of survival to discharge than those who do not receive CPR until their condition progresses to pulseless cardiac arrest, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Report Cards Lead to Few Hospital Performance Changes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A publicly released report card on hospitals' performance on cardiac quality indicators didn't significantly improve their performance on process-of-care indicators related to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or congestive heart failure (CHF), according to Canadian research published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Treatment Reduces Contrast-Induced Kidney Injury

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A prophylactic protocol using a combination of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sodium bicarbonate should be implemented to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) resulting from contrast agents used in cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions, according to a meta-analysis reported in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Preeclampsia Linked to Higher Hypothyroidism Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In nulliparous pregnant women, preeclampsia is associated with risk of subclinical hypothyroidism later in pregnancy, and women with a history of preeclampsia may be at higher risk of reduced thyroid function later in life, according to research published Nov. 17 in BMJ.

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Transcendental Meditation Can Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who complete a program of training in transcendental meditation, and who are at risk of hypertension, are able to use the relaxation method to lower their blood pressure and levels of psychological distress, according to a study published online Oct. 1 and in the December issue of the American Journal of Hypertension.

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Rates of High LDL Cholesterol Fell During Recent Period

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In a recent period, the prevalence of high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults fell by roughly one-third, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Studies Examine Effectiveness of Implantable Defibrillators

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in preventing death after heart failure, but are not effective in preventing death early after a heart attack, according to two reviews in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Mishkin
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Abstract - Goldberger
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Stress-Only Heart Imaging May Be Sufficient

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Additional rest imaging is unlikely to have an effect on survival but increases radiation dose in patients whose stress myocardial perfusion imaging is normal, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Less Heart Disease Diagnosed in Women Before Arrest

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience sudden cardiac death are much less likely than men to have been diagnosed with structural heart disease, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drugs to Lower Anemia Risk Linked to Pulmonary Embolism

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to reduce anemia risk has rapidly increased since their approval to nearly half of advanced cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, but they are associated with a higher risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism while having no effect on the rate of blood transfusion, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Obesity Linked to Risk of Heart Enlargement

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and hypertension increase the risk of developing left atrial enlargement in the general population, according to a study in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Exercise Linked to Less Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise was associated with lower risk of prostate cancer upon biopsy, as well as lower risk of high-grade disease in those with cancer, and African-American men with increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) showed a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis, according to two studies in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract - Antonelli
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Abstract - Moses
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Hemoglobin A1C Levels May Be Better Predictor of Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hemoglobin A1C levels are a better predictor of retinopathy than fasting plasma glucose, according to a study in the November Diabetes Care. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that routine lowering of blood pressure and intensive glucose control substantially improve renal outcomes and reduces death in type 2 diabetes patients.

Abstract - Cheng
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Abstract - Zoungas
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Cardiac Problems Present in Adults With Kawasaki Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An increasing number of adults who had Kawasaki disease as children will present with cardiovascular problems, but no guidelines currently exist for the management of these patients, according to a review in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Menstrual Cycle Shows Effect on Exhaled Nitric Oxide Levels

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In premenopausal women with asthma who don't use oral contraceptives, there are significant associations between sex hormones and asthma markers, according to a study published in the November issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Common Infections May Increase Risk of First Stroke

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to five common infections potentially linked to atherosclerosis may increase the risk for first stroke, according to the Northern Manhattan Study published online Nov. 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Clopidogrel Can Be Effective in Reducing Cardiac Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The antiplatelet drug clopidogrel is likely effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in both men and women, according to a study in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Early Treatment Needed for Drug-Induced Hypertension

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Early management of cediranib-induced hypertension is effective in patients with advanced cancers, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Models Assess Heart Disease Based on Glucose Tolerance

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Two models are more predictive than a third in assessing the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on glucose tolerance in older adults, according to a study in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Revascularization in Renovascular Disease Studied

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Revascularization through angioplasty and stenting does not significantly improve renal function in patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease compared to medical therapy alone, according to a study in the Nov. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Elderly Slow Walkers at More Risk of Cardiovascular Death

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Elders who walk slowly are more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their faster walking counterparts, regardless of age, sex, body mass index or the amount of physical activity they engage in, according to a study published Nov. 10 in BMJ.

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Trend Steady in Medicare Heart Failure Readmissions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of Medicare data for 2004 to 2006 found no significant change in the rate of hospital readmission among beneficiaries who have been hospitalized for heart failure and discharged, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Wider Income Gap May Mean Poorer Health for Everybody

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Income inequality has an adverse outcome on health, and narrowing the divide between the rich and poor yields health benefits across society, not just to the poor, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in BMJ.

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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Long-Term Statin Use Linked to Lower Gallstone Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of statins is associated with a lower risk of gallstones that require surgery to remove the gallbladder, according to a study in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Non-Fasting Lipid Levels Can Stratify Vascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke can be assessed by measuring cholesterol or apolipoprotein levels, without the need to fast, according to a study in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Drug Not Linked to Smaller Infarct Size Post-STEMI

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of erythropoietin (EPO) does not appear to reduce the infarct size in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) also treated with a thrombolytic, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Fasting Glucose Changes May Predict Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Fasting glucose changes during acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations may serve as better prognostic indicators than fasting glucose taken at baseline, according to an Israeli study in the Oct. 15 American Journal of Cardiology.

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Genetics, Cardiac Risks

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics contribute to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which in turn is associated with patient-reported cardiovascular health and quality of life, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Xie
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Abstract - Cohen
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Shorter Working Hours May Compromise Surgeon Training

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although restricting trainee surgeons' working hours may improve the trainees' quality of life, it may also compromise their education and undermine patient safety, according to an article published Nov. 5 in BMJ.

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Kidney Function Can Affect Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Decline in kidney function is associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to two studies published online Nov. 5 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, while a third study published online Nov. 5 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology found that there is a link between higher phosphorous levels and calcification of the coronary arteries.

Abstract - Matsushita
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Abstract - Shlipak
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Abstract - Tuttle & Short
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High Testosterone May Raise Cardiac Risks in Older Women

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women over the age of 65 years who have higher levels of testosterone may likely be at greater risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), according to a study published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Study Examines How Estrogen Protects Against Stroke

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen can protect the brain against stroke damage by free radicals, but only if present before the stroke, which may shed light on why women are more susceptible to stroke damage after menopause, according to a study in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Abstract
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Independent Predictors of Cardiac Risk Evaluated

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with normal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) results, a severe coronary artery calcium score (CACS) may predict high long-term cardiac risk, according to research published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Different Aortic Valves Linked to Similar Long-Term Survival

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bioprosthetic (BP) valves for aortic valve replacement have similar longer-term survival rates as mechanical valves (MP), but may carry a higher risk of valve failure and reoperation, according to an Italian study published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Off-Pump and On-Pump Heart Bypass Outcomes Compared

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) performed with cardiopulmonary bypass support (on-pump) produced better results after one year than CABG performed without bypass support (off-pump), according to a study in the Nov. 5 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Aspirin May Not Help Prevent Primary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The potential benefits and harms of using aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease are too finely balanced for the drug to be recommended for routine use in at-risk patients with no history of cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the November issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

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Low Cholesterol May Decrease Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Two studies published online Nov. 3 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention may dissolve the long standing concern that low cholesterol levels may lead to a higher risk of cancer.

Abstract - Ahn
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Strategy for Blood Pressure Control in Pakistan Examined

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of family physician office visits and family-based home health education (HHE) may be effective in reducing blood pressure (BP), according to a study completed in Pakistan and reported in the Nov. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Stats Helps Paint Picture of H1N1 Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The age of people hospitalized with H1N1 influenza infection in California during the summer of 2009 was typically younger than the age commonly seen with seasonal influenza, and infants had the highest rates of hospitalization and those aged 50 and older had the highest mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Perioperative Beta-Blocker Therapy Guidelines Updated

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA) recommends perioperative beta-blocker use dependent on careful consideration of the benefits and risks to an individual patient, according to an update of the 2007 guidelines outlining cardiovascular evaluation and care for non-cardiac surgery published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Benefits, Risks of Darbepoetin Alfa in Diabetes Assessed

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and anemia, darbepoetin alfa does not reduce death, cardiovascular or renal events, and may be linked to an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pediatric H1N1 Influenza Deaths Reach at Least 114

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- As of Friday, 19 children had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, bringing the total number of pediatric deaths from the disease to at least 114, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 30 news conference.

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