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Category: Endocrinology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Diabetes Incidence Projected to Double in 25 Years

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The number of patients with type 2 diabetes is projected to double over the next 25 years, and the associated costs are estimated to triple, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Efficacy of Revascularization Strategies Similar in Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In diabetic patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) plus stenting may be as effective as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), although the risk of repeat revascularization is higher with PCI, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Effect of Dietary Restriction on Lifespan Explained

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Factors have been identified that explain how dietary restriction increases lifespan and reduces pathology in a model of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published Nov. 17 in PLoS Biology.

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Rituximab Found Beneficial in Early Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a four-dose course of rituximab helps preserve some beta-cell function after a year, according to a study in the Nov. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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County-Level Data Reveals Diabetes, Obesity Hot Spots

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Model-based estimates can give meaningful and valid county-level data on the prevalence of diabetes and obesity that is useful for local public health officials, according to a report published in the Nov. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Variables Potentially Involved in Prostate Growth Assessed

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels may be linked to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which could have implications for PSA screening for prostate cancer, according to research published in the November issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Advances in Eating Disorders Summarized in Lancet Seminar

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New developments in eating disorders, including research on the biological contributions to illness onset and maintenance, may have important implications for clinicians, according to a Seminar published online Nov. 19 in The Lancet.

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Preeclampsia Linked to Higher Hypothyroidism Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In nulliparous pregnant women, preeclampsia is associated with risk of subclinical hypothyroidism later in pregnancy, and women with a history of preeclampsia may be at higher risk of reduced thyroid function later in life, according to research published Nov. 17 in BMJ.

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Drug May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Ocular Complications

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In rats induced with type 1 diabetes, topical treatment with naltrexone hydrochloride (NTX), an opioid antagonist, reverses dry eye and restores corneal sensitivity, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Slow Eating Raises Response to Appetite Control Hormones

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The rate at which individuals eat a meal may affect the postprandial response of gut peptides, according to a crossover study conducted in Greece and published online Oct. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Hemoglobin A1C Levels May Be Better Predictor of Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hemoglobin A1C levels are a better predictor of retinopathy than fasting plasma glucose, according to a study in the November Diabetes Care. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that routine lowering of blood pressure and intensive glucose control substantially improve renal outcomes and reduces death in type 2 diabetes patients.

Abstract - Cheng
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Abstract - Zoungas
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CDC: New H1N1 Tracking Method Ups Estimates

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- At least 22 million Americans have been infected with H1N1 since April, and approximately 3,900 people have died, including an estimated 540 children, according to information presented at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Nov. 12 H1N1 press conference.

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Models Assess Heart Disease Based on Glucose Tolerance

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Two models are more predictive than a third in assessing the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on glucose tolerance in older adults, according to a study in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Wider Income Gap May Mean Poorer Health for Everybody

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Income inequality has an adverse outcome on health, and narrowing the divide between the rich and poor yields health benefits across society, not just to the poor, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in BMJ.

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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

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Estrogens Found to Modestly Increase Breast Density

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women, the use of conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) may lead to a small increase in mammographic density maintained over 24-months, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Non-Fasting Lipid Levels Can Stratify Vascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke can be assessed by measuring cholesterol or apolipoprotein levels, without the need to fast, according to a study in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Factors Linked to Postpartum Diabetes Identified

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women with gestational diabetes have at least a four-fold risk of developing postpartum diabetes if they have two or more risk factors, according to a study in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Factors Affecting Continuous Glucose Monitoring Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to perform continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) nearly daily if they are adults and if they were already frequently monitoring their glucose, according to a study in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Targeted Therapies in Diabetic Nephropathy Examined

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation appears to play a role in numerous changes associated with early kidney disease seen in type 1 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 23 in Endocrinology.

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Fasting Glucose Changes May Predict Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Fasting glucose changes during acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations may serve as better prognostic indicators than fasting glucose taken at baseline, according to an Israeli study in the Oct. 15 American Journal of Cardiology.

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Cellular Pathway Implicated in Diabetic Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- An additional cellular signaling pathway activated by hyperglycemia is involved in the death of retinal cells that lead to diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Nature Medicine.

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Hormone Therapy May Lower Mortality in Younger Women

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Younger postmenopausal women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may have a lower risk of mortality than women undergoing no treatment, according to the results of a Bayesian meta-analysis published in the November issue of the American Journal of Medicine.

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High Fish Intake May Not Reduce Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The protective effect of total fish, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may not reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research completed in the Netherlands and published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Kidney Function Can Affect Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Decline in kidney function is associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to two studies published online Nov. 5 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, while a third study published online Nov. 5 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology found that there is a link between higher phosphorous levels and calcification of the coronary arteries.

Abstract - Matsushita
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Abstract - Shlipak
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Abstract - Tuttle & Short
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High Testosterone May Raise Cardiac Risks in Older Women

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women over the age of 65 years who have higher levels of testosterone may likely be at greater risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), according to a study published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Study Looks at Five-Year Effect of Treatment in Macular Edema

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) may be helpful in treating some cases of advanced diabetic macular edema (DME), according to research published in the November issue of Ophthalmology.

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Stats Helps Paint Picture of H1N1 Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The age of people hospitalized with H1N1 influenza infection in California during the summer of 2009 was typically younger than the age commonly seen with seasonal influenza, and infants had the highest rates of hospitalization and those aged 50 and older had the highest mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Weight Loss and Maintenance Variables Assessed

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Formerly overweight people who have maintained weight loss tend to spend more calories exercising and have greater dietary restraint than obese people seeking weight loss treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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FDA Warns Exenatide Could Cause Kidney Problems

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has revised the label of the type 2 diabetes drug exenatide (Byetta) to provide information about possible kidney function problems, including kidney failure, according to a Nov. 2 press release issued by the agency.

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Perioperative Beta-Blocker Therapy Guidelines Updated

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA) recommends perioperative beta-blocker use dependent on careful consideration of the benefits and risks to an individual patient, according to an update of the 2007 guidelines outlining cardiovascular evaluation and care for non-cardiac surgery published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Adherence Linked to Glycemic Control in Youth With Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Greater adherence to treatment is associated with better glycemic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, supporting current guidelines where this had been implicitly assumed, according to a review published online Nov. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Exercise Can Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Teens

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic teenagers who engage in moderate aerobic exercise may not lose weight, but they can improve their overall fitness and increase both peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Low Vitamin D Linked to End-Stage Renal Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D deficiency may explain the increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) found in non-Hispanic blacks, according to research published online Oct. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

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Benefits, Risks of Darbepoetin Alfa in Diabetes Assessed

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and anemia, darbepoetin alfa does not reduce death, cardiovascular or renal events, and may be linked to an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pediatric H1N1 Influenza Deaths Reach at Least 114

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- As of Friday, 19 children had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, bringing the total number of pediatric deaths from the disease to at least 114, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 30 news conference.

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