Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

November 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Study Predicts Hep C Therapy Will Prevent Few Deaths

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- If present trends continue in the United States, only 14.5 percent of future hepatitis C-related deaths will be prevented by antiviral treatment, which may be due to a lack of patients diagnosed and referred for treatment, according to a study in the December issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Behavioral, Drug Therapies Can Benefit Autistic Children

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may benefit from the Early Start Denver Model behavioral intervention or treatment with aripiprazole, according to two studies published online Nov. 30 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Dawson
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Owen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Care Linked to Varying Effects on Childhood Injuries

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of formal child care -- such as a day care center -- was associated with both higher and lower risk of unintentional injury in infants, depending on the children's socioeconomic group, according to research published online Nov. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Incidence Projected to Double in 25 Years

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The number of patients with type 2 diabetes is projected to double over the next 25 years, and the associated costs are estimated to triple, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Depressed Nonresident Fathers Less Close to Sons

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- African-American fathers who do not live with their children are likely to be less involved with their sons if they are suffering from depression, and treating their depression may be an important means to help them play a more active and positive part in their children's lives, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cigarettes Teeming With Bacteria, Other Pathogens

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarettes contain more than a dozen different types of bacteria, as well as other harmful pathogens that could play a role in smokers' increased risk of infectious and chronic respiratory diseases, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Full Text

Exposure to Phthalates in Womb May Shorten Gestation

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women who are exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) during the third trimester of pregnancy may give birth earlier than their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Speech Comprehension Found to Depend on Tactile Cues

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding speech depends on tactile as well as visual cues in allowing people to distinguish between aspirated and unaspirated sounds such as "p" and "d," according to a study in the Nov. 26 issue of Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Avoiding Work Conflict Linked to Poor Heart Outcomes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men who covertly cope with unfairness at work rather than directly confronting it may be at greater risk of heart attack or heart-related death, according to research published online Nov. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

West Nile Virus Slipped Through Blood Screening Net

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- West Nile virus still poses a threat to organ transplant and blood product recipients, despite the introduction of nationwide screening, according to a report published in the Nov. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Proximity to Airports Increases Exposure to Ultrafine Particles

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Emissions emanating from airports reach for hundreds of meters downwind, and increase exposure to ultrafine particles by a factor of 2.5 over background levels, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.

Abstract

Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Effect of Dietary Restriction on Lifespan Explained

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Factors have been identified that explain how dietary restriction increases lifespan and reduces pathology in a model of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published Nov. 17 in PLoS Biology.

Full Text

Genetic Variants Associated With Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are genetic variants associated with Parkinson's disease, some of which are specific to certain populations, according to a study in the December issue of Nature Genetics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insomnia Prevalence High for Chemotherapy Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, insomnia is about three times as prevalent as it is among the general population, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ultrasound and CT Imaging Similar in Pediatric Pneumonia

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Chest ultrasound is as effective as computed tomography (CT) for visualizing the lungs of children with pneumonia and parapneumonic effusion, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caseworker May Improve Health of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Providing feedback on mental and physical health to a telephone caseworker, and receiving management strategies, may improve supportive care outcomes in cancer patients, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Microembolic Events Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Microemboli and microvascular obstruction are common in acute coronary thrombosis and sudden cardiac death, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Article Offers Overview on Diuretics for Hypertension

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Thiazide diuretics, commonly regarded by physicians as the diuretics of choice for long-term antihypertensive therapy, are the focus of a review article in the Nov. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Novel Antibody Identified in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Although most patients with autoimmune pancreatitis have a novel antibody, so do some patients with pancreatic cancer, so testing for the antibody cannot differentiate between the two conditions, according to a study in the Nov. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rituximab Found Beneficial in Early Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a four-dose course of rituximab helps preserve some beta-cell function after a year, according to a study in the Nov. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Plasma Troponin T Level Linked to Heart Failure, Death

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Troponin T concentrations in blood plasma measured using a new and more sensitive assay process were found to be associated with cardiovascular death and heart failure among coronary artery disease patients, but not myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Worrisome Spike Seen in Pneumococcal Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 vaccine supply continues to increase, but serious pneumococcal infections are on the rise around the country, according to a Nov. 25 press briefing held by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

High Salt Intake Can Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High salt consumption is associated with increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, and, given that average salt consumption in most Western countries is close to double the World Health Organization-recommended limit of 5 g a day, population-wide measures to control salt intake are warranted, according to a study published Nov. 24 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Reveals Cancer Patients' Views on Advanced Directives

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Seriously ill cancer patients may harbor attitudes toward advanced directives -- particularly with whom they wish to discuss them -- that appear paradoxical, according to research published online Nov. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician-Pharmacist Team Improves Hypertension Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Family practices in which pharmacists actively collaborated with physicians on blood pressure (BP) control medications achieved better BP control, and adhered to treatment guidelines better, than practices where pharmacists did not play an active role, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Sheds Light on Chemo Effects in Lung Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy on survival in non-small-cell lung cancer may fade over time, according to research published online Nov. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Chemoembolization, Survival in Liver Cancer Studied

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in conjunction with a permanent embolic agent survived longer than patients who underwent TACE with a nonpermanent embolic agent, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Traffic Pollution Associated With Wheezing in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to traffic-related pollution are at higher risk of developing wheeze, according to two studies in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract - Ryan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Patel
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Delayed Treatment May Result in Irreversible Heart Damage

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who receive primary percutaneous coronary intervention, time to reperfusion is associated with the level of reversible and irreversible myocardial injury, including significantly reduced salvaged myocardium with increased time to reperfusion, according to a study the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Gingko Biloba May Not Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Twice daily doses of Gingko biloba did not show any benefit over placebo in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among elderly subjects in a study published online Nov. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Patients' Adverse Event Reports Useful Measure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Asking cancer patients to self-report adverse events as a result of treatment yields information that is different and complementary to that provided by clinicians in their adverse event reports, according to a study published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Women Confused About Healthy Length of Gestation

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of women who recently had babies suggests that many women are confused about the length of gestation that constitutes a full-term pregnancy, and what gestation period is safe for delivery, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Elders With Chronic Pain More Likely to Suffer Falls

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people who have to contend with chronic pain are more likely to sustain a fall than their counterparts with little or no pain, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, while a study published in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine found that the use of psychotropic medications also increases the risk of falls in elderly patients.

Abstract - Leveille
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Woolcott
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Benefit of IV Drugs in Out-of-Hospital Resuscitation Studied

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous administration of drugs during out-of-hospital treatment for cardiac arrest does not improve the odds of survival, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Higher Volume of Angioplasty May Not Improve Outcomes

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The number of angioplasty procedures a hospital performs affects the median door-to-balloon time, and use of evidence-based treatments, but in-hospital mortality rates do not improve with higher volumes, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychoses May Increase Risk of Death From Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psychotic disorders are at higher risk of death from heart disease than people who do not have a mental disorder, according to a study in the November/December issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Home-Based Care Effective for Advanced HIV Infection

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Home-based antiretroviral care is as effective as facility-based care for Ugandan patients with advanced HIV infection at much lower cost to the patient, according to a study published online Nov. 24 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Assesses Incomplete Skin Cancer Excisions

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Incomplete excision of skin cancers by non-specialists in Australia may occur at a reasonable rate, but with wide variation between individual clinicians, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In-Utero Phthalate Exposure Can Affect Boys' Play

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The concentrations of two common phthalates in the urine of expectant mothers are correlated with less male-typical play by their sons at preschool age, according to study published online Nov. 16 in the International Journal of Andrology.

Abstract
Full Text

Vaccine Appears to Have No Impact on Pregnancy Outcome

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- There is no evidence that vaccination with the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is harmful to the fetus, but vaccination during pregnancy is still not recommended, according to two studies published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Garland
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Dana
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise Linked to Lower Risk of Stroke in Elderly Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to heavy physical activity such as hiking or swimming is associated with a lower risk of stroke in elderly men, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

3-D Software Useful to Check Outcome of Facial Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Three-dimensional images from computer tomography (CT) scans can help ensure good results from surgery to treat orbital blowout fractures, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Consumer Advertising Drove Up Clopidogrel Cost, Not Usage

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of clopidogrel did not increase use of the medication, but did increase its unit cost and Medicaid pharmacy expenditures, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rofecoxib Cardiovascular Risk Apparent in Late 2000

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Dozens of studies on rofecoxib revealed its association with an increased risk of cardiovascular events nearly three and a half years before it was voluntarily withdrawn by maker Merck and Company, according to a study in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Sexually Transmitted Infection Found Common in Teen Girls

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescent girls, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is substantial, and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common infection, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Physical Activity Levels in N.C. Child Care Centers Assessed

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most child care centers evaluated in North Carolina do not meet optimum standards for child play activity under the newly-developed Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAPSACC) guidelines, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Text Messages Shown to Help Improve Sunscreen Use

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile phone text messages may be used to help people remember to apply sunscreen, and to narrow the gap between patients' understanding of the importance of using sunscreen and actual daily practice, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Winter Flu May Push Pediatric Intensive Care to Limit

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for pediatric intensive care unit beds in the United Kingdom is likely to exceed demand during the anticipated flu pandemic this winter, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Children in Day Care Likely Exposed to More Television

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In preschool-aged children enrolled in child care settings, previous estimates of daily television exposure may have underestimated actual viewing time, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Toxicants Associated With Increased Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal and childhood exposure to toxicants such as tobacco and lead may be significantly associated with an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High HLA Gene Expression May Slow AIDS Progression

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- High HLA-C expression on cell surfaces in individuals infected with HIV appears to slow progression to full-blown AIDS, while better controlling plasma viral loads, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Nature Genetics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Influenza Rates Fall in Some Parts of United States

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although H1N1 influenza is still widespread in most states, there have been declines in some areas of the country, a federal health official announced Nov. 20 at a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention press briefing.

More Information

Efficacy of Transradial Catheterization Studied

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing coronary catheterization, transradial coronary angiography and angioplasty is as safe and effective as the transfemoral approach, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Algorithms Help Predict Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Two new algorithms, QFractureScores, may accurately predict fracture risk without laboratory measurements, and may be suitable for use in both clinical settings and for self assessment, according to a U.K. study published online Nov. 19 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Patients With Limited English Present Practice Challenges

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Important practice setting differences exist in the use and availability of trained medical interpreters and telephone interpretation services for communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) patients, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Health Services Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Video Found to Be Useful in Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent girls who watch a community-specific video intervention at the time of diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease may be significantly more likely to have their sexual partners treated, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Deformational Plagiocephaly Risk Factors Evaluated

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children's sleep position appears correlated with the location of deformational plagiocephaly (DP), which typically presents as a flat spot on the back of the skull, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pandemic Influenza May Hurt Economy in United Kingdom

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although pandemic influenza may only decrease the gross domestic product (GDP) by up to 4.3 percent in the United Kingdom, school closures and absenteeism from work due to government regulations or fear of infection may negatively impact the economy and potentially increase the effect of the recession, according to a study published Nov. 19 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Salmeterol Found Similarly Effective in Asthma Genotypes

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Outcomes in the long-acting β2 agonist in asthma trial showed no difference in treatment outcomes for patients taking salmeterol who had different B16 genotypes, according to a report in the Nov. 21 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

County-Level Data Reveals Diabetes, Obesity Hot Spots

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Model-based estimates can give meaningful and valid county-level data on the prevalence of diabetes and obesity that is useful for local public health officials, according to a report published in the Nov. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines Updated

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Women should not start getting routine cervical cancer tests until age 21, and then they should repeat them every two years instead of annually though age 30, according to new guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Sleep Apnea in Kidney Transplant Patients Assessed

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with kidney disease who underwent or are awaiting transplant is similar, but transplant recipients with the sleep disorder may be at higher risk for hypertension, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Variables Potentially Involved in Prostate Growth Assessed

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels may be linked to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which could have implications for PSA screening for prostate cancer, according to research published in the November issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Five New Loci Linked to Early Inflammatory Bowel Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Early-onset inflammatory bowel disease is associated with common genetic variants at five new loci, according to a letter published online Nov. 15 in Nature Genetics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Multiple Sclerosis Pregnancy Outcomes Generally Good

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy have a marginally higher risk of outcomes such as intrauterine growth restriction and cesarean delivery, but a similar risk of other adverse pregnancy outcomes as the general population, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Watchful Waiting Safe for Some Prostate Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Active surveillance of localized prostate cancer, with treatment introduced if the cancer progresses, is feasible and safe, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Late Preterm Births Increased 20 Percent Since 1990

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The number of infants born "late preterm," or between 34 and 36 weeks of pregnancy, rose by 20 percent in the United States between 1990 and 2006, according to the November issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief.

More Information

Smoking Linked to Higher Seizure Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Women who smoke have a higher risk of seizure, while past smokers have a modestly increased risk of epilepsy, according to a study published in Epilepsia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Advances in Eating Disorders Summarized in Lancet Seminar

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New developments in eating disorders, including research on the biological contributions to illness onset and maintenance, may have important implications for clinicians, according to a Seminar published online Nov. 19 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Provides Insight Into Bone-Overgrowth Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a mutation in the ACVR1 receptor appears to promote cartilage formation by inducing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Full Text

Herpes Virus Shedding Studied With Mathematical Model

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) experience almost constant releases of small numbers of viruses from the neurons that host them into the genital tract, which may make prevention of person-to-person transmission difficult, according to a mathematical model of HSV-2 behavior described in a paper published online Nov. 18 in Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Associated With Lower Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Men who drink alcohol are at lower risk of coronary heart disease than their non-drinking counterparts, according to a Spanish study published online Nov. 19 in Heart.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Surgery Errors in Veterans Hospitals Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Errors during ophthalmologic and orthopedic surgeries were the most common found in a study of surgery errors occurring in veterans hospitals, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Invited Critique (subscription or payment may be required)

Imaging Can Predict Early Response to Cancer Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging by combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) can accurately assess early treatment response to chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer, according to a study in the November issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Guidelines Developed for Lung Cancer Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) updated guidelines for chemotherapy and biologic therapy for stage IV non-small cell lung cancer were published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Heart Attack, Coronary Disease Treatment Guidelines Updated

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency care for heart attack patients requires a communitywide, coordinated response in order to deliver the best treatment, according to a report published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

CPR Indicated in Pediatric Bradycardia, Poor Perfusion

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized pediatric patients who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for bradycardia and poor perfusion have a better chance of survival to discharge than those who do not receive CPR until their condition progresses to pulseless cardiac arrest, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Uninsured Show Higher Risk for Death Following Trauma

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- People who suffer traumatic injury and don't have health insurance have an increased mortality risk compared to those who are insured, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Treatment Reduces Contrast-Induced Kidney Injury

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A prophylactic protocol using a combination of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sodium bicarbonate should be implemented to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) resulting from contrast agents used in cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions, according to a meta-analysis reported in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Near-Total Face and Maxilla Transplant Deemed Successful

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A near-total face and maxilla transplant has been successfully performed on a woman who had already had many major reconstructive surgeries, according to an article in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Preeclampsia Linked to Higher Hypothyroidism Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In nulliparous pregnant women, preeclampsia is associated with risk of subclinical hypothyroidism later in pregnancy, and women with a history of preeclampsia may be at higher risk of reduced thyroid function later in life, according to research published Nov. 17 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Transcendental Meditation Can Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who complete a program of training in transcendental meditation, and who are at risk of hypertension, are able to use the relaxation method to lower their blood pressure and levels of psychological distress, according to a study published online Oct. 1 and in the December issue of the American Journal of Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Qutenza Approved for Post-Shingles Nerve Pain

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The Qutenza (capsaicin) skin patch has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat pain due to postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the nerve pain that may follow shingles, drug maker NeurogesX said in a news release.

National Library of Medicine

Study Investigates Syndrome Akin to Neurofibromatosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A condition recently named Legius syndrome -- associated with SPRED1 mutations -- may be difficult to differentiate from neurofibromatosis type 1 based on dermatologic findings, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Links Folic Acid and Vitamin B12 to Cancer

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation is associated with increased cancer incidence and cancer mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of High LDL Cholesterol Fell During Recent Period

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In a recent period, the prevalence of high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults fell by roughly one-third, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mothers' Smoking Associated With Breast-Feeding Practices

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who smoke may be less likely to begin breast-feeding, and, if they do initiate it, they may be more likely to cease earlier than nonsmoking mothers, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Studies Examine Effectiveness of Implantable Defibrillators

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in preventing death after heart failure, but are not effective in preventing death early after a heart attack, according to two reviews in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Mishkin
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Goldberger
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Complication Rates for Irradiated Nose Grafts

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage (IHCC) grafts for rhinoplasties is associated with a low complication rate and high patient satisfaction, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Food Allergies Among American Children Increasing

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The awareness and prevalence of food allergies among American children has increased in recent years, resulting in a significant increase in hospitalizations and use of outpatient medical services, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stress-Only Heart Imaging May Be Sufficient

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Additional rest imaging is unlikely to have an effect on survival but increases radiation dose in patients whose stress myocardial perfusion imaging is normal, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Less Heart Disease Diagnosed in Women Before Arrest

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience sudden cardiac death are much less likely than men to have been diagnosed with structural heart disease, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Trivalent Vaccine Has Minimal Effect on H1N1

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccination neither decreases nor increases the risk for acquiring pandemic H1N1 illness, according to research published in the Nov. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Still Only Merits a D

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In terms of premature births, the United States earned a D for the second consecutive year, according to a report issued Nov. 17 by the March of Dimes.

Press Release
State Report Cards

National Mammography Recommendations Revised

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Routine mammography screening for breast cancer is recommended for women between the ages of 50 and 74, and should be repeated every two years, according to revised recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - U.S.

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: November 2009 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology Next: November 2009 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.