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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Behavioral, Drug Therapies Can Benefit Autistic Children

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may benefit from the Early Start Denver Model behavioral intervention or treatment with aripiprazole, according to two studies published online Nov. 30 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Dawson
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Abstract - Owen
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Efficacy of Revascularization Strategies Similar in Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In diabetic patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) plus stenting may be as effective as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), although the risk of repeat revascularization is higher with PCI, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Effect of Dietary Restriction on Lifespan Explained

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Factors have been identified that explain how dietary restriction increases lifespan and reduces pathology in a model of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published Nov. 17 in PLoS Biology.

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Genetic Variants Associated With Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are genetic variants associated with Parkinson's disease, some of which are specific to certain populations, according to a study in the December issue of Nature Genetics.

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Gingko Biloba May Not Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Twice daily doses of Gingko biloba did not show any benefit over placebo in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among elderly subjects in a study published online Nov. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Elders With Chronic Pain More Likely to Suffer Falls

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people who have to contend with chronic pain are more likely to sustain a fall than their counterparts with little or no pain, according to a study published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, while a study published in the Nov. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine found that the use of psychotropic medications also increases the risk of falls in elderly patients.

Abstract - Leveille
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Abstract - Woolcott
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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Exercise Linked to Lower Risk of Stroke in Elderly Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to heavy physical activity such as hiking or swimming is associated with a lower risk of stroke in elderly men, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Toxicants Associated With Increased Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal and childhood exposure to toxicants such as tobacco and lead may be significantly associated with an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Deformational Plagiocephaly Risk Factors Evaluated

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children's sleep position appears correlated with the location of deformational plagiocephaly (DP), which typically presents as a flat spot on the back of the skull, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Sleep Apnea in Kidney Transplant Patients Assessed

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with kidney disease who underwent or are awaiting transplant is similar, but transplant recipients with the sleep disorder may be at higher risk for hypertension, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Study Suggests Treatment for Down's Syndrome

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treatments that address deficient norepinephrine-mediated neurotransmission could treat cognitive dysfunction in Down's syndrome, according to the results of animal research published in the Nov. 18 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Multiple Sclerosis Pregnancy Outcomes Generally Good

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy have a marginally higher risk of outcomes such as intrauterine growth restriction and cesarean delivery, but a similar risk of other adverse pregnancy outcomes as the general population, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoking Linked to Higher Seizure Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Women who smoke have a higher risk of seizure, while past smokers have a modestly increased risk of epilepsy, according to a study published in Epilepsia.

Abstract
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Herpes Virus Shedding Studied With Mathematical Model

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) experience almost constant releases of small numbers of viruses from the neurons that host them into the genital tract, which may make prevention of person-to-person transmission difficult, according to a mathematical model of HSV-2 behavior described in a paper published online Nov. 18 in Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
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Surgery Errors in Veterans Hospitals Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Errors during ophthalmologic and orthopedic surgeries were the most common found in a study of surgery errors occurring in veterans hospitals, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Prion Protein Gene Variant Protects Against Kuru

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among the population of the Papua New Guinea highlands, where there was a devastating outbreak of the prion disease kuru, carriers of certain genetic variants were protected from the disease, according to a study published in the Nov. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Investigates Syndrome Akin to Neurofibromatosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A condition recently named Legius syndrome -- associated with SPRED1 mutations -- may be difficult to differentiate from neurofibromatosis type 1 based on dermatologic findings, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Nervous System Cancer Linked to Cognitive Impairment

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) cancers are more likely to report reduced neurocognitive function resulting in lower education, employment and income in adulthood than survivors of other cancers, according to a study in the November issue of Neuropsychology.

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Low-Level Laser Treatment May Help Ease Neck Pain

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Low-level laser therapy can effectively treat both acute and chronic neck pain, with benefits lasting up to 22 weeks for chronic pain, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in The Lancet.

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Common Infections May Increase Risk of First Stroke

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to five common infections potentially linked to atherosclerosis may increase the risk for first stroke, according to the Northern Manhattan Study published online Nov. 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Knee Ligament Reconstruction Techniques Compared

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The tibial inlay double-bundle technique for knee reconstruction may stabilize the joint better than two single-bundle techniques, according to a Korean study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Study Finds Features Linked to Mortality Risk in Parkinson's

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A variety of motor and non-motor factors may be associated with a higher risk of mortality in patients with early Parkinson's disease, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Elderly Slow Walkers at More Risk of Cardiovascular Death

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Elders who walk slowly are more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their faster walking counterparts, regardless of age, sex, body mass index or the amount of physical activity they engage in, according to a study published Nov. 10 in BMJ.

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MRI Found to Be Useful in Predicting Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with a clinically isolated syndrome treated with interferon beta-1b, the modified Barkhof criteria may provide some value in predicting conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS), according to a multicenter, randomized study published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Halladay
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Abstract - Ewart
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Muscle Strength May Lower Alzheimer's Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals with greater muscular strength may have a lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Biopsy Recommended During Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- During treatment of presumed osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, obtaining bone biopsies may lead to the discovery of unsuspected malignancies, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

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Poor Handwriting Prevalent in Children With Autism

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have worse handwriting than children without the condition, and can benefit from special handwriting instruction and fine motor control training, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Adolescent Obesity Linked to MS Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women who were obese in adolescence are at higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) as adults, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Post-Surgical Pain in Children Can Be Effectively Managed

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For children undergoing surgery, implementation of evidence-based pain management strategies and the ability to identify children at risk are important for effective pain management, according to a study in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Study Looks at Potential Benefits of Ligamentoplasty

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Ligamentoplasty may be associated with less adjacent-segment disease and fewer reoperations compared with lumbar fusion surgery, according to a Japanese study published in the October issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Lumbar Spine Functional Restoration Program Evaluated

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic disabling occupational lumbar disorders enrolled in an interdisciplinary functional restoration program will likely achieve normal range of motion (ROM) and quantitative lumbar flexion-relaxation phenomenon (QLFRP), according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Cooling Reduces Brain Injury for Oxygen-Starved Babies

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who are starved of oxygen at birth have less brain injury if they are therapeutically cooled than if they are not, and the likelihood of death or disability in these infants can be accurately predicted using MRI, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Shorter Working Hours May Compromise Surgeon Training

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although restricting trainee surgeons' working hours may improve the trainees' quality of life, it may also compromise their education and undermine patient safety, according to an article published Nov. 5 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Examines How Estrogen Protects Against Stroke

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen can protect the brain against stroke damage by free radicals, but only if present before the stroke, which may shed light on why women are more susceptible to stroke damage after menopause, according to a study in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Abstract
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Self-Paced Walking Test Useful in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, a self-paced walking test (SPWT) may serve as a feasible and reproducible criterion measure of walking capacity, according to a Canadian study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Thromboprophylaxis Indicated in Spinal Cord Injury

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Early thromboprophylaxis should be used to prevent deep-vein thrombosis in patients who have suffered an acute spinal cord injury, according to a meta-analysis in the November issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Risk Factors Identified for Alzheimer's Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure and inflammatory markers signal an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease among middle-aged persons who have a parent with the disease, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Early MS Relapses Linked to Short-Term Risk of Progression

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Early relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS) pose more short-term risk of disease progression than long-term consequences, according to a Canadian retrospective review published online Nov. 4 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Stats Helps Paint Picture of H1N1 Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The age of people hospitalized with H1N1 influenza infection in California during the summer of 2009 was typically younger than the age commonly seen with seasonal influenza, and infants had the highest rates of hospitalization and those aged 50 and older had the highest mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Study Assesses Heritability in Degenerative Brain Disorder

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The different syndromes within frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) have varying heritability, but, overall, FTLD is highly heritable, according to research published in the Nov. 3 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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