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Category: Ophthalmology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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3-D Software Useful to Check Outcome of Facial Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Three-dimensional images from computer tomography (CT) scans can help ensure good results from surgery to treat orbital blowout fractures, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Laser-Treated Corneas Found Suitable for Donor Tissue

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) are not likely associated with any significant long-term effect on the corneal endothelium, and may be used as donor tissue, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Surgery Errors in Veterans Hospitals Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Errors during ophthalmologic and orthopedic surgeries were the most common found in a study of surgery errors occurring in veterans hospitals, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Cataract Surgery Unlikely to Affect the Progression of AMD

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract surgery is not associated with an increased risk of AMD progression. In addition, dietary fats may have differential effects on the risk of AMD, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract - Dong
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Abstract - Parekh
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Drug May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Ocular Complications

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In rats induced with type 1 diabetes, topical treatment with naltrexone hydrochloride (NTX), an opioid antagonist, reverses dry eye and restores corneal sensitivity, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Research Supports Assessment Method Used in SCORE Study

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The evaluation methods for optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images used in the SCORE study appear suitable for other studies of retinal vein occlusion, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Hemoglobin A1C Levels May Be Better Predictor of Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hemoglobin A1C levels are a better predictor of retinopathy than fasting plasma glucose, according to a study in the November Diabetes Care. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that routine lowering of blood pressure and intensive glucose control substantially improve renal outcomes and reduces death in type 2 diabetes patients.

Abstract - Cheng
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Abstract - Zoungas
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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Halladay
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Abstract - Ewart
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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Cataract Surgery May Benefit Macular Degeneration

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with varying degrees of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may benefit in terms of visual acuity from cataract surgery, according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) published in the November issue of Ophthalmology.

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Cellular Pathway Implicated in Diabetic Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- An additional cellular signaling pathway activated by hyperglycemia is involved in the death of retinal cells that lead to diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Nature Medicine.

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Study Looks at Five-Year Effect of Treatment in Macular Edema

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) may be helpful in treating some cases of advanced diabetic macular edema (DME), according to research published in the November issue of Ophthalmology.

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