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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Behavioral, Drug Therapies Can Benefit Autistic Children

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may benefit from the Early Start Denver Model behavioral intervention or treatment with aripiprazole, according to two studies published online Nov. 30 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Dawson
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Abstract - Owen
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Child Care Linked to Varying Effects on Childhood Injuries

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of formal child care -- such as a day care center -- was associated with both higher and lower risk of unintentional injury in infants, depending on the children's socioeconomic group, according to research published online Nov. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Abstract
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Arterial Duct Stenting Deemed Beneficial to Neonates

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonates with congenital heart disease with duct-dependent pulmonary circulation (CHD-DPC), percutaneous arterial duct stenting is as effective as the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt in fostering pulmonary artery growth, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Depressed Nonresident Fathers Less Close to Sons

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- African-American fathers who do not live with their children are likely to be less involved with their sons if they are suffering from depression, and treating their depression may be an important means to help them play a more active and positive part in their children's lives, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Exposure to Phthalates in Womb May Shorten Gestation

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women who are exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) during the third trimester of pregnancy may give birth earlier than their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract
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Ultrasound and CT Imaging Similar in Pediatric Pneumonia

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Chest ultrasound is as effective as computed tomography (CT) for visualizing the lungs of children with pneumonia and parapneumonic effusion, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
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CDC: Worrisome Spike Seen in Pneumococcal Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 vaccine supply continues to increase, but serious pneumococcal infections are on the rise around the country, according to a Nov. 25 press briefing held by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Traffic Pollution Associated With Wheezing in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to traffic-related pollution are at higher risk of developing wheeze, according to two studies in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract - Ryan
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Abstract - Patel
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Many Women Confused About Healthy Length of Gestation

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of women who recently had babies suggests that many women are confused about the length of gestation that constitutes a full-term pregnancy, and what gestation period is safe for delivery, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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In-Utero Phthalate Exposure Can Affect Boys' Play

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The concentrations of two common phthalates in the urine of expectant mothers are correlated with less male-typical play by their sons at preschool age, according to study published online Nov. 16 in the International Journal of Andrology.

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Sexually Transmitted Infection Found Common in Teen Girls

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescent girls, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is substantial, and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common infection, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Physical Activity Levels in N.C. Child Care Centers Assessed

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most child care centers evaluated in North Carolina do not meet optimum standards for child play activity under the newly-developed Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAPSACC) guidelines, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Text Messages Shown to Help Improve Sunscreen Use

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile phone text messages may be used to help people remember to apply sunscreen, and to narrow the gap between patients' understanding of the importance of using sunscreen and actual daily practice, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Winter Flu May Push Pediatric Intensive Care to Limit

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for pediatric intensive care unit beds in the United Kingdom is likely to exceed demand during the anticipated flu pandemic this winter, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Abstract
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Children in Day Care Likely Exposed to More Television

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In preschool-aged children enrolled in child care settings, previous estimates of daily television exposure may have underestimated actual viewing time, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Toxicants Associated With Increased Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal and childhood exposure to toxicants such as tobacco and lead may be significantly associated with an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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H1N1 Influenza Rates Fall in Some Parts of United States

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although H1N1 influenza is still widespread in most states, there have been declines in some areas of the country, a federal health official announced Nov. 20 at a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention press briefing.

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Video Found to Be Useful in Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent girls who watch a community-specific video intervention at the time of diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease may be significantly more likely to have their sexual partners treated, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.

Abstract
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Deformational Plagiocephaly Risk Factors Evaluated

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children's sleep position appears correlated with the location of deformational plagiocephaly (DP), which typically presents as a flat spot on the back of the skull, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pandemic Influenza May Hurt Economy in United Kingdom

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although pandemic influenza may only decrease the gross domestic product (GDP) by up to 4.3 percent in the United Kingdom, school closures and absenteeism from work due to government regulations or fear of infection may negatively impact the economy and potentially increase the effect of the recession, according to a study published Nov. 19 in BMJ.

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Salmeterol Found Similarly Effective in Asthma Genotypes

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Outcomes in the long-acting β2 agonist in asthma trial showed no difference in treatment outcomes for patients taking salmeterol who had different B16 genotypes, according to a report in the Nov. 21 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Late Preterm Births Increased 20 Percent Since 1990

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The number of infants born "late preterm," or between 34 and 36 weeks of pregnancy, rose by 20 percent in the United States between 1990 and 2006, according to the November issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief.

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Advances in Eating Disorders Summarized in Lancet Seminar

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New developments in eating disorders, including research on the biological contributions to illness onset and maintenance, may have important implications for clinicians, according to a Seminar published online Nov. 19 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Hypertension Found Common in Pediatric Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children with chronic kidney disease often have high blood pressure, increasing their risk of left ventricular enlargement, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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CPR Indicated in Pediatric Bradycardia, Poor Perfusion

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized pediatric patients who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for bradycardia and poor perfusion have a better chance of survival to discharge than those who do not receive CPR until their condition progresses to pulseless cardiac arrest, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Mothers' Smoking Associated With Breast-Feeding Practices

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who smoke may be less likely to begin breast-feeding, and, if they do initiate it, they may be more likely to cease earlier than nonsmoking mothers, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Food Allergies Among American Children Increasing

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The awareness and prevalence of food allergies among American children has increased in recent years, resulting in a significant increase in hospitalizations and use of outpatient medical services, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Trivalent Vaccine Has Minimal Effect on H1N1

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccination neither decreases nor increases the risk for acquiring pandemic H1N1 illness, according to research published in the Nov. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Still Only Merits a D

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In terms of premature births, the United States earned a D for the second consecutive year, according to a report issued Nov. 17 by the March of Dimes.

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No Adverse Effects Seen After Testis Biopsy in Boys

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The biopsy of testicular tissue from prepubescent boys with cancer for cryopreservation did not cause serious adverse after-effects and may someday offer a way to preserve fertility, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Human Reproduction.

Abstract
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People at High Risk of Swine Flu Warned to Avoid Hajj

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Public health consultants to the Saudi Arabian government have recommended that pilgrims in categories at high risk for H1N1 swine who are planning to take part in the 2009 Hajj should postpone their participation until another year, according to a paper published online Nov. 14 in The Lancet.

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Housing Improvements Linked to Improvements in Health

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Better housing conditions -- especially warmth and energy-efficiency improvements -- are generally associated with better health, according to a study the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
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Cardiac Problems Present in Adults With Kawasaki Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An increasing number of adults who had Kawasaki disease as children will present with cardiovascular problems, but no guidelines currently exist for the management of these patients, according to a review in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Campaign to Decrease Illegal Antibiotic Use Assessed

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An educational initiative may not be sufficient to decrease use of antibiotics without a prescription (WORx) by the Latino community, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Acetaminophen Use Linked to Asthma and Wheezing

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adults, acetaminophen use may be associated with an increased risk of asthma and wheezing, according to a study published in the November issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Early Interventions Can Cut Teen Pregnancy Rates

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Early intervention and youth development programs can reduce the risk of teenage pregnancy, but they do not tackle larger-scale societal and family influences on early parenthood, according to a study published Nov. 12 in BMJ.

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CDC: New H1N1 Tracking Method Ups Estimates

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- At least 22 million Americans have been infected with H1N1 since April, and approximately 3,900 people have died, including an estimated 540 children, according to information presented at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Nov. 12 H1N1 press conference.

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Adolescent Sex and Alcohol Interventions Assessed

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A group intervention aimed at reducing alcohol and sexual risk behaviors in adolescents in juvenile detention centers may alter risky behaviors, according to a randomized, controlled study published online Nov. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Signs of Urinary Stones May Be Hard to Detect in Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In children younger than 8 years of age, the origin of recurrent abdominal pain may be overlooked and ineffective procedures performed, without consideration of urolithiasis, according to a study completed in Italy and published online Nov. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Childhood Esophageal Atresia Linked to Adult Scoliosis

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with a history of esophageal atresia repair during infancy face a substantially higher risk of scoliosis, according to research published online Nov. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Risk Communication Key to Keeping H1N1 Deaths Down

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital preparedness and risk communication are crucial to the reduction in mortality due to H1N1 influenza, according to a study published online Nov. 12 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Halladay
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Abstract - Ewart
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Report Highlights Year's Major Cancer Advances

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The year's most important clinical cancer research studies, including 15 major advances, are highlighted in a new report, "Clinical Cancer Advances 2009: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention and Screening," published online Nov. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Emergency Department Wait Times at Longest in a Decade

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The number of patients who are not seen within target triage times at American hospital emergency departments has been steadily increasing for at least the last decade, according to a study published in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Poor Handwriting Prevalent in Children With Autism

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have worse handwriting than children without the condition, and can benefit from special handwriting instruction and fine motor control training, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Adolescent Obesity Linked to MS Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women who were obese in adolescence are at higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) as adults, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Pollutants May Increase Bronchiolitis Risk in Infants

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of traffic-related air pollutants may raise the risk of bronchiolitis in infants, according to research published in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Post-Surgical Pain in Children Can Be Effectively Managed

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For children undergoing surgery, implementation of evidence-based pain management strategies and the ability to identify children at risk are important for effective pain management, according to a study in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Drainage Alone May Be Best in Treating Children's Abscesses

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Avoiding changing dressings after incision and drainage of cutaneous abscesses in children can effectively treat the condition and avoid postoperative pain and hospitalization, according to a study in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Factors Affecting Continuous Glucose Monitoring Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to perform continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) nearly daily if they are adults and if they were already frequently monitoring their glucose, according to a study in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Cooling Reduces Brain Injury for Oxygen-Starved Babies

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who are starved of oxygen at birth have less brain injury if they are therapeutically cooled than if they are not, and the likelihood of death or disability in these infants can be accurately predicted using MRI, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Genetics, Cardiac Risks

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics contribute to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which in turn is associated with patient-reported cardiovascular health and quality of life, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Xie
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Abstract - Cohen
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Maternal Smoking Affects Risk of Childhood Bad Behavior

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking is associated with disruptive behavior in 3-year-olds, but the effect varies by gender, the extent to which the mother smoked, and the interaction with other co-occurring conditions, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Education Can Help Overcome the Effects of Low Birth Weight

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- An early years' educational intervention for low-birth-weight preterm infants results in children who are taller, heavier, and have a bigger head circumference at the age of 8 years, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Genetic Link to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Identified

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic mutations that interfere with interleukin-10 signaling are associated with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Mexican Assistance Program Linked to Benefits for Children

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A Mexican conditional cash-transfer program -- providing money to families so long as children go to school and members attend health-education meetings -- was associated with reduced behavioral problems in children, according to research published online Nov. 4 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Often-Used Antibiotics Not Linked to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Penicillins, erythromycins and cephalosporins, antibacterial drugs that are commonly used by women during pregnancy, are rarely associated with birth defects, but other antibacterial agents such as sulfonamides and nitrofurantoins are associated with several defects and warrant further scrutiny, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Television Time Linked to Aggression in Toddlers

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Three-year-olds' direct and indirect exposure to television is significantly associated with increased risk for aggressive behavior, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Stats Helps Paint Picture of H1N1 Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The age of people hospitalized with H1N1 influenza infection in California during the summer of 2009 was typically younger than the age commonly seen with seasonal influenza, and infants had the highest rates of hospitalization and those aged 50 and older had the highest mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Following Gastroenteritis Guidelines Can Lower Costs

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that adhere to guidelines for the management of acute gastroenteritis demonstrate 50 percent lower charges for pediatric patients with uncomplicated acute gastroenteritis, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pregnant Women Need Only One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- One dose of H1N1 vaccine is sufficient for pregnant women, though young children need two doses, according to a Nov. 2 announcement from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

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Weight Loss and Maintenance Variables Assessed

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Formerly overweight people who have maintained weight loss tend to spend more calories exercising and have greater dietary restraint than obese people seeking weight loss treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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Adherence Linked to Glycemic Control in Youth With Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Greater adherence to treatment is associated with better glycemic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, supporting current guidelines where this had been implicitly assumed, according to a review published online Nov. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Exercise Can Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Teens

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic teenagers who engage in moderate aerobic exercise may not lose weight, but they can improve their overall fitness and increase both peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Pediatric H1N1 Influenza Deaths Reach at Least 114

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- As of Friday, 19 children had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, bringing the total number of pediatric deaths from the disease to at least 114, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 30 news conference.

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