Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

November 2009 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Behavioral, Drug Therapies Can Benefit Autistic Children

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may benefit from the Early Start Denver Model behavioral intervention or treatment with aripiprazole, according to two studies published online Nov. 30 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Dawson
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Owen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depressed Nonresident Fathers Less Close to Sons

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- African-American fathers who do not live with their children are likely to be less involved with their sons if they are suffering from depression, and treating their depression may be an important means to help them play a more active and positive part in their children's lives, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Avoiding Work Conflict Linked to Poor Heart Outcomes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men who covertly cope with unfairness at work rather than directly confronting it may be at greater risk of heart attack or heart-related death, according to research published online Nov. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insomnia Prevalence High for Chemotherapy Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, insomnia is about three times as prevalent as it is among the general population, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caseworker May Improve Health of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Providing feedback on mental and physical health to a telephone caseworker, and receiving management strategies, may improve supportive care outcomes in cancer patients, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychoses May Increase Risk of Death From Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psychotic disorders are at higher risk of death from heart disease than people who do not have a mental disorder, according to a study in the November/December issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Text Messages Shown to Help Improve Sunscreen Use

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile phone text messages may be used to help people remember to apply sunscreen, and to narrow the gap between patients' understanding of the importance of using sunscreen and actual daily practice, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Children in Day Care Likely Exposed to More Television

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In preschool-aged children enrolled in child care settings, previous estimates of daily television exposure may have underestimated actual viewing time, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Advances in Eating Disorders Summarized in Lancet Seminar

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New developments in eating disorders, including research on the biological contributions to illness onset and maintenance, may have important implications for clinicians, according to a Seminar published online Nov. 19 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Transcendental Meditation Can Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who complete a program of training in transcendental meditation, and who are at risk of hypertension, are able to use the relaxation method to lower their blood pressure and levels of psychological distress, according to a study published online Oct. 1 and in the December issue of the American Journal of Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sexual Satisfaction Important for Women's Well-Being

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual satisfaction is associated with better psychological well-being in women, underscoring the importance of sexual function to women's overall health, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Housing Improvements Linked to Improvements in Health

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Better housing conditions -- especially warmth and energy-efficiency improvements -- are generally associated with better health, according to a study the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Interventions Can Cut Teen Pregnancy Rates

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Early intervention and youth development programs can reduce the risk of teenage pregnancy, but they do not tackle larger-scale societal and family influences on early parenthood, according to a study published Nov. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

More Use of Medical Assistants Can Benefit Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Expanded use of lower level clinical personnel, such as medical assistants (MAs), in primary care can enhance patient care but only if the clinical personnel are trained and integrated into the practice culture, according to a pair of studies in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Ferrer
Full Text
Abstract - Gensichen
Full Text

Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Halladay
Full Text
Abstract - Ewart
Full Text

Muscle Strength May Lower Alzheimer's Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals with greater muscular strength may have a lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Job Satisfaction Essential to Elders' Work Force Retention

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Because retirement may reduce the burden of workers' self-perceived health problems, improved conditions for workers approaching retirement are essential to maintain labor-market participation, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Lopez
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Fat Diet May Improve Mood Over Long Term

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with a low-carbohydrate diet, a low-fat diet has a more positive impact on mood state in overweight and obese patients, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Uptake of Adult Vaccination Varies Widely in Urban Areas

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide variations in the uptake of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and influenza vaccine in adults in urban areas, and physicians' practice characteristics influence the likelihood of their patients getting vaccinated, according to a study in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Genetics, Cardiac Risks

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics contribute to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which in turn is associated with patient-reported cardiovascular health and quality of life, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Xie
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Cohen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk Factors Identified for Alzheimer's Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure and inflammatory markers signal an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease among middle-aged persons who have a parent with the disease, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Switching to 'Light' Cigarettes May Lower Chances of Quitting

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who switch to so-called low-tar or 'lighter' brands of cigarettes often do so with the intention to quit, but switching actually reduces the likelihood that they will subsequently quit smoking, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Tobacco Control.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adjunctive Psychotherapy for Depression Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Adjunctive psychotherapy added to antidepressant medications for patients with chronic depression did not increase the proportion of patients achieving remission, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mexican Assistance Program Linked to Benefits for Children

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A Mexican conditional cash-transfer program -- providing money to families so long as children go to school and members attend health-education meetings -- was associated with reduced behavioral problems in children, according to research published online Nov. 4 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Television Time Linked to Aggression in Toddlers

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Three-year-olds' direct and indirect exposure to television is significantly associated with increased risk for aggressive behavior, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Weight Loss and Maintenance Variables Assessed

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Formerly overweight people who have maintained weight loss tend to spend more calories exercising and have greater dietary restraint than obese people seeking weight loss treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Medicaid Enrollment Common Among Overdose Deaths

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of patients who overdosed on prescription opioid painkillers in Washington state in the past few years were Medicaid recipients, according to a report in the Oct. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: November 2009 Briefing - Pediatrics Next: November 2009 Briefing - Pulmonology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.