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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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November 2009 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: December 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for November 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Arterial Duct Stenting Deemed Beneficial to Neonates

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonates with congenital heart disease with duct-dependent pulmonary circulation (CHD-DPC), percutaneous arterial duct stenting is as effective as the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt in fostering pulmonary artery growth, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Efficacy of Revascularization Strategies Similar in Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In diabetic patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) plus stenting may be as effective as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), although the risk of repeat revascularization is higher with PCI, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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West Nile Virus Slipped Through Blood Screening Net

MONDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- West Nile virus still poses a threat to organ transplant and blood product recipients, despite the introduction of nationwide screening, according to a report published in the Nov. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Study Finds Surgeon Burnout Associated With Medical Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, degree of burnout was strongly associated with major medical errors, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Chemoembolization, Survival in Liver Cancer Studied

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in conjunction with a permanent embolic agent survived longer than patients who underwent TACE with a nonpermanent embolic agent, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Most Medical Journals Have Conflict of Interest Policies

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most high impact factor journals have publicly available conflict of interest statement policies, but there is a great deal of variation among journals, which could be confusing for authors, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Assesses Incomplete Skin Cancer Excisions

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Incomplete excision of skin cancers by non-specialists in Australia may occur at a reasonable rate, but with wide variation between individual clinicians, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Racial Disparities in Colon Cancer Mortality Unexplained

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in comorbidities and weight do not explain the higher risk of death in African-Americans with colon cancer compared with Caucasians, according to a study published online Nov. 24 in Cancer.

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3-D Software Useful to Check Outcome of Facial Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Three-dimensional images from computer tomography (CT) scans can help ensure good results from surgery to treat orbital blowout fractures, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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How to Improve GI Surgery Mortality in the Elderly Studied

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients older than 75 years who undergo major gastrointestinal tract surgery have substantially higher morbidity -- including pulmonary and urologic complications -- and mortality than younger patients, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Remote Pacemaker Monitoring More Effective Than Standard

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Remote pacemaker monitoring is more effective than traditional transtelephonic monitoring (TTM), detecting clinical events more quickly and frequently, according to a study in the Nov. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Post-PCI Mortality Similar With Enoxaparin or Heparin

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, those receiving enoxaparin have similar one-year mortality rates compared to those receiving unfractionated heparin, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Left Ventricular Pacing Site Important in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In cardiomyopathy patients referred for implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device, the left ventricular (LV) pacing site primarily determines the hemodynamic response, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patients With Limited English Present Practice Challenges

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Important practice setting differences exist in the use and availability of trained medical interpreters and telephone interpretation services for communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) patients, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Health Services Research.

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Laser-Treated Corneas Found Suitable for Donor Tissue

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) are not likely associated with any significant long-term effect on the corneal endothelium, and may be used as donor tissue, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Deformational Plagiocephaly Risk Factors Evaluated

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children's sleep position appears correlated with the location of deformational plagiocephaly (DP), which typically presents as a flat spot on the back of the skull, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Embryonic Stem Cells Show Potential for Skin Substitute

FRIDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be used to create a stratified epithelium resembling normal human epidermis, a finding that has potential implications in producing temporary skin replacement for burn patients, according to research published in the Nov. 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Late Preterm Births Increased 20 Percent Since 1990

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The number of infants born "late preterm," or between 34 and 36 weeks of pregnancy, rose by 20 percent in the United States between 1990 and 2006, according to the November issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief.

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Surgery Errors in Veterans Hospitals Studied

THURSDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Errors during ophthalmologic and orthopedic surgeries were the most common found in a study of surgery errors occurring in veterans hospitals, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Uninsured Show Higher Risk for Death Following Trauma

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- People who suffer traumatic injury and don't have health insurance have an increased mortality risk compared to those who are insured, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Treatment Reduces Contrast-Induced Kidney Injury

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A prophylactic protocol using a combination of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sodium bicarbonate should be implemented to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) resulting from contrast agents used in cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions, according to a meta-analysis reported in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Near-Total Face and Maxilla Transplant Deemed Successful

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A near-total face and maxilla transplant has been successfully performed on a woman who had already had many major reconstructive surgeries, according to an article in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Low Complication Rates for Irradiated Nose Grafts

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage (IHCC) grafts for rhinoplasties is associated with a low complication rate and high patient satisfaction, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Stress-Only Heart Imaging May Be Sufficient

TUESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Additional rest imaging is unlikely to have an effect on survival but increases radiation dose in patients whose stress myocardial perfusion imaging is normal, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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No Adverse Effects Seen After Testis Biopsy in Boys

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The biopsy of testicular tissue from prepubescent boys with cancer for cryopreservation did not cause serious adverse after-effects and may someday offer a way to preserve fertility, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Human Reproduction.

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Optical Techniques Accurately Identify Precancerous Polyps

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- During routine colonoscopy, optical diagnosis may be as reliable and more cost-effective for correctly diagnosing small colorectal polyps than conventional histopathology, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Nervous System Cancer Linked to Cognitive Impairment

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) cancers are more likely to report reduced neurocognitive function resulting in lower education, employment and income in adulthood than survivors of other cancers, according to a study in the November issue of Neuropsychology.

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Cataract Surgery Unlikely to Affect the Progression of AMD

MONDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract surgery is not associated with an increased risk of AMD progression. In addition, dietary fats may have differential effects on the risk of AMD, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract - Dong
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Abstract - Parekh
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Risk Factors for Shoulder Redislocation Examined

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for redislocation among patients who have had a corrective arthroscopic procedure may be linked to younger age, male gender and longer duration between injury and surgery, according to an Italian study in the November issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Study Examines Outcome of Upper Urinary Tract Cancers

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), the location of the tumor in the renal pelvis compared to the ureter doesn't predict cancer-specific mortality, according to research published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Exercise Linked to Less Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise was associated with lower risk of prostate cancer upon biopsy, as well as lower risk of high-grade disease in those with cancer, and African-American men with increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) showed a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis, according to two studies in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract - Antonelli
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Abstract - Moses
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Knee Ligament Reconstruction Techniques Compared

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The tibial inlay double-bundle technique for knee reconstruction may stabilize the joint better than two single-bundle techniques, according to a Korean study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Signs of Urinary Stones May Be Hard to Detect in Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In children younger than 8 years of age, the origin of recurrent abdominal pain may be overlooked and ineffective procedures performed, without consideration of urolithiasis, according to a study completed in Italy and published online Nov. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Esophageal Atresia Linked to Adult Scoliosis

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with a history of esophageal atresia repair during infancy face a substantially higher risk of scoliosis, according to research published online Nov. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Morning Colonoscopies Found to Yield More Polyps

THURSDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The number of polyps detected by colonoscopy declines as the day progresses, indicating that those conducting endoscopies may be at their most adept at the start of the day, according to a study in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Revascularization in Renovascular Disease Studied

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Revascularization through angioplasty and stenting does not significantly improve renal function in patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease compared to medical therapy alone, according to a study in the Nov. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Cancer Recurrence Linked to High Breast Density

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Women with invasive breast cancer and high-density breast tissue who undergo breast-conserving surgery without radiotherapy are likely at an increased risk of recurrence, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in Cancer.

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Study Finds Costs of Quality Programs Burden Practices

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of providing data and support for health system quality-improvement programs can put a significant burden on primary care practices, and changes in the outcomes of trials are often made without being disclosed, according to two studies in the November/December Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract - Halladay
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Abstract - Ewart
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Report Highlights Year's Major Cancer Advances

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The year's most important clinical cancer research studies, including 15 major advances, are highlighted in a new report, "Clinical Cancer Advances 2009: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention and Screening," published online Nov. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Medical Errors Disclosure Can Help Physicians and Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are willing to share their experiences of making diagnostic errors, and analyzing them systematically helps point the way to improve future diagnoses, according to a study in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while a second study in the same issue found that patients give higher quality ratings when adverse events are disclosed.

Abstract - Schiff
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Abstract - Lopez
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Long-Term Statin Use Linked to Lower Gallstone Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of statins is associated with a lower risk of gallstones that require surgery to remove the gallbladder, according to a study in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Chronic Pain Can Be a Problem Years After Breast Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite breast-conserving surgery and other advances, post-breast surgery pain and sensory disturbances remained problems for many women in a Danish survey reported in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Factors May Raise Stone Risk After Gastric Bypass Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Following gastric bypass surgery, patients may develop urinary changes that raise their risk of developing kidney stones, according to research published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Biopsy Recommended During Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

TUESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- During treatment of presumed osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, obtaining bone biopsies may lead to the discovery of unsuspected malignancies, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

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Benefits of Steroid Use After Knee Arthroplasty Studied

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The injection of corticosteroids and pain relieving agents post-total knee arthroplasty may shorten hospital stay but does not seem to improve pain, range of motion or knee function as compared to injection of pain relieving agents alone, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Post-Surgical Pain in Children Can Be Effectively Managed

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For children undergoing surgery, implementation of evidence-based pain management strategies and the ability to identify children at risk are important for effective pain management, according to a study in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Study Looks at Potential Benefits of Ligamentoplasty

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Ligamentoplasty may be associated with less adjacent-segment disease and fewer reoperations compared with lumbar fusion surgery, according to a Japanese study published in the October issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Drainage Alone May Be Best in Treating Children's Abscesses

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Avoiding changing dressings after incision and drainage of cutaneous abscesses in children can effectively treat the condition and avoid postoperative pain and hospitalization, according to a study in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Cataract Surgery May Benefit Macular Degeneration

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with varying degrees of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may benefit in terms of visual acuity from cataract surgery, according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) published in the November issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Lumbar Spine Functional Restoration Program Evaluated

MONDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic disabling occupational lumbar disorders enrolled in an interdisciplinary functional restoration program will likely achieve normal range of motion (ROM) and quantitative lumbar flexion-relaxation phenomenon (QLFRP), according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Fasting Glucose Changes May Predict Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Fasting glucose changes during acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations may serve as better prognostic indicators than fasting glucose taken at baseline, according to an Israeli study in the Oct. 15 American Journal of Cardiology.

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Shorter Working Hours May Compromise Surgeon Training

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although restricting trainee surgeons' working hours may improve the trainees' quality of life, it may also compromise their education and undermine patient safety, according to an article published Nov. 5 in BMJ.

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Shock-Wave Therapy and Surgery for Fractures Assessed

FRIDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy may be as effective as surgery in promoting the union of long-bone factures over the long term and may provide better short-term clinical outcomes than surgery, according to a study in the November Journal of Joint & Bone Surgery.

Abstract
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Study Looks at Five-Year Effect of Treatment in Macular Edema

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) may be helpful in treating some cases of advanced diabetic macular edema (DME), according to research published in the November issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Different Aortic Valves Linked to Similar Long-Term Survival

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bioprosthetic (BP) valves for aortic valve replacement have similar longer-term survival rates as mechanical valves (MP), but may carry a higher risk of valve failure and reoperation, according to an Italian study published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Thromboprophylaxis Indicated in Spinal Cord Injury

THURSDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Early thromboprophylaxis should be used to prevent deep-vein thrombosis in patients who have suffered an acute spinal cord injury, according to a meta-analysis in the November issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Off-Pump and On-Pump Heart Bypass Outcomes Compared

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) performed with cardiopulmonary bypass support (on-pump) produced better results after one year than CABG performed without bypass support (off-pump), according to a study in the Nov. 5 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Markers Can Predict Risk of Melanoma Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of five markers can identify patients at high risk of recurrent melanoma who could benefit from additional treatment, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Stats Helps Paint Picture of H1N1 Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The age of people hospitalized with H1N1 influenza infection in California during the summer of 2009 was typically younger than the age commonly seen with seasonal influenza, and infants had the highest rates of hospitalization and those aged 50 and older had the highest mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Perioperative Beta-Blocker Therapy Guidelines Updated

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA) recommends perioperative beta-blocker use dependent on careful consideration of the benefits and risks to an individual patient, according to an update of the 2007 guidelines outlining cardiovascular evaluation and care for non-cardiac surgery published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Background Disease Rates Important in H1N1 Pandemic

MONDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- During mass immunization with pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines, awareness of background rates of disease is essential for assessing vaccine safety, and may help allay vaccine-associated fears among the general public, according to an article published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

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