Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Hematology | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pathology | Pediatrics | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

ASH: Gene Findings May Benefit Infants With Leukemia

Last Updated: December 07, 2009.

 

Newly discovered translocations may improve treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
In infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, newly discovered translocations of the MLL gene on chromosome 11 may help guide treatment decisions, according to research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 5 to 8 in New Orleans.

MONDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, newly discovered translocations of the MLL gene on chromosome 11 may help guide treatment decisions, according to research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 5 to 8 in New Orleans.

Blaine W. Robinson, Ph.D., of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues studied 221 infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were enrolled in a clinical trial.

The researchers found that 74 percent of the patients had MLL translocations in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. They identified the two most common partner genes that fused with the MLL gene as AF4 on chromosome 4 and ENL on chromosome 19, and found that event-free survival associated with these translocations was 34 and 29 percent, respectively. By contrast, children with the third most common partner gene, AF9, and children whose MLL gene was unaffected had significantly higher event-free survival rates (68 and 66 percent, respectively).

"Our ability to classify acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on specific partner genes of MLL may provide a new way to categorize which infants might benefit from specific types of treatment," senior author Carolyn A. Felix, M.D., said in a statement. "We also hope these findings will contribute to the development of new, molecularly targeted therapies for infants with this grim form of cancer that we seek to conquer."

Abstract
More Information

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Cervical Spine Surgery Protocol May Reduce Delirium Next: Study Calls Coverage of Antidepressants Insufficient

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.