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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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December 2009 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: January 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for December 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Precautions and Training Can Reduce Scalpel Injuries

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although less common than needle-stick injuries, cuts from scalpels also put operating room personnel at risk and can be reduced by closely following safety precautions and taking advantage of new technology, according to a study in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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LDL Cholesterol Not the Only Culprit in Heart Disease

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Though low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is usually the primary target of lipid-lowering therapies, high levels of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides, and a high total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio also carry an elevated risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Dec. 29/Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Discharge Planning Measures May Not Cut Readmissions

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that collate and make publicly available discharge planning data do not necessarily have lower readmission rates than those that do not collate the data, according to a study in the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Operating Room Nurses Must Know Heart Failure Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Perioperative nurses caring for patients requiring surgical treatment for heart failure need a working knowledge of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of chronic heart failure, according to an article in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Nausea and Vomiting Found Common Heart Attack Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) that occurs in both inferior and anterior AMIs, but the frequency of these symptoms are unlikely related to the infarct location, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Medical Device Studies for Premarket Approval Assessed

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Premarket approval (PMA) of cardiovascular medical devices based on early-stage studies are typically not statistically powered adequately and may potentially be biased, according to a study in the Dec. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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New Tool Assesses Cardiac Death Risk in Heart Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Duke University researchers have developed a tool to stratify risk among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and identify those at highest risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a report in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome and Heart Disease Risk in Men Studied

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, and this applies regardless of their body mass index, although those without metabolic syndrome who are overweight or obese are also at increased risk, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Progenitor Cells May Counter Chemotherapy Damage

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- It may be possible to prevent cardiomyopathy caused by chemotherapy by obtaining cardiac progenitor cells before initiating treatment and using them for prevention or management of heart failure, according to the findings of a study in rats published online Dec. 28 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Statins Found to Be Beneficial in Congestive Heart Failure

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with heart failure, statins are safe, improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and decrease the risk of hospitalization for worsening heart failure, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Therapies for CAD Patients With Kidney Disease Compared

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) used with medical therapy or medical therapy used singly improved angina symptoms similarly among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Certain Medications May Alter Quad Screen Results

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant woman's use of certain prescription drugs may skew results of the standard Quad screening and increase the rate of screen-positives for neural tube defects, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Statins May Not Target All Lipid Abnormalities

THURSDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although statin therapy is effective at lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, it has no effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Nearly 50 percent of new statin users may require additional therapy to achieve optimal lipid levels, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Novel Gene Variants Associated With Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered two novel gene variants that are linked to increased lipoprotein(a) levels and increased risk of coronary disease, according to a study in the Dec. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Health Impact of Body Mass Index May Be Misleading

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse impact of low body mass index (BMI) on risk of respiratory disease and lung cancer mortality may be overstated, while the negative impact of high BMI on cardiovascular disease mortality may be underestimated, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Over 85s Function Well Despite Disease and Disability

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Elders over the age of 85 report good health and functional ability despite the fact that they have to contend with a range of diseases and disabilities; however, as the fastest growing segment of the world's population, the health needs of future generations of over 85s represent a profound challenge, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Editorial

Scanner Identifies Many Coronary Artery Stenoses

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The 64-MDCT scanner technology can accurately identify coronary artery stenoses in many (but not all) patients, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
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Coxibs May Inhibit Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Celecoxib and other coxibs may interfere with the antiplatelet activity of low-dose aspirin, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Study Assesses Cardiac Rehab Impact on Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare beneficiaries with coronary heart disease who have exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation sessions have lower odds of death and myocardial infarction on a dose-dependent basis, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Density Lipoprotein Pros Missing for Diabetes Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The vasoprotective effects of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) seen in healthy people are absent in those with type 2 diabetes, but the impact of diabetes can be mitigated with extended-release niacin therapy, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Bystander Resuscitation Found to Rarely Cause Injury

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on directions are unlikely to sustain an injury as a result, even if they are not in arrest, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract
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CRP Levels Linked to Heart Disease, but Causality Unlikely

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- C-reactive protein (CRP) blood concentration is associated with risk of a range of diseases, including heart attack, stroke, cancer death and chronic lung disease, but most of the associations between CRP levels and heart disease are explained by risk factors already known to cause heart disease, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Antidepressants Not Found to Increase Heart Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking antidepressants, whether they are tricyclic medications or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are not at increased risk of coronary heart disease compared to their counterparts not taking the drugs, but there is a modestly higher risk of mortality and stroke, according to a study in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Cost of Treatment for Heart Disease and Stroke Increasing

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated cost of treatment for cardiovascular disease and stroke in the United States in 2010 is estimated to be $503.2 billion, a 5.8 percent increase over the previous year, according to the American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics -- 2010 Update, published online Dec. 17 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Aspirin Benefits Seem Similar Regardless of Diabetes Status

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The benefit of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events and death appears to be similar in people with and without diabetes, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Study Ties Ambulatory BP Monitoring to Disturbed Sleep

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure is associated with reduced sleep and physical activity, and may increase the likelihood that blood pressure will not follow normal circadian rhythms, according to a study published online Dec. 17 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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ACTN2 Implicated in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the alpha-actinin-2 (ACTN2) gene appear to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), according to research published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Most Stroke Survivors Take an Antithrombotic Agent

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A large proportion of stroke survivors used antithrombotic agents during a recent period, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Risk of Microemboli Reduced in Some Stenosis Patients

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS), the presence of microemboli is associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular events, but intensive medical therapy may reduce the risk of microemboli, according to research published online Dec. 14 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Stroke Education Program Improves Student Knowledge

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A stroke education program for middle-school students in a largely Hispanic population, which has a higher incidence of stroke than other groups, improves knowledge of stroke signs and treatment, according to a study published online in Health Promotion Practice.

Abstract
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Intensive Lipid-Lowering Cuts Risk of Repeat Cardiac Events

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Follow-up analyses of two studies on intensive versus less intensive lipid-lowering regimens conclude that intensive lipid-lowering is superior for preventing recurrent cardiovascular events, according to two studies in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Murphy
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Tikkanen
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Smoking Status Predicts Long-Term Survival After First AMI

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who quit smoking before or after a first heart attack significantly improve their odds of long-term survival, and smokers who reduce their consumption after a heart attack also have a modest survival benefit, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Implantable Defibrillator Can Cut Mortality in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Older heart failure patients who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) had lower mortality over three years than patients who did not receive the device, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Abstract
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Statins May Provide Benefit Despite Low LDL

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Based on data from an earlier trial, individuals with low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) may benefit from statins to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Contraindications to Beta Blockers Linked to Deaths

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Contraindications to early beta-blocker use become more common with increasing age and are associated with a higher risk of hospital death in patients with acute coronary syndromes, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Comorbidity Affects Outcome of Glycemic Control in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The cardiovascular benefits of intensive glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients are reduced if they have high levels of comorbidity, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Popular Children's Song Slips From Hit Parade on CPR Chart

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Pacing the compressions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to the children's song Nellie the Elephant, successfully achieved an approximation of the recommended 100-compressions-per-minute rate, but not the required depth of compression, according to a study published Dec. 13 in BMJ.

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Chronic Kidney Patients Can Benefit From Carotid Surgery

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease and high-grade carotid stenosis are at higher risk of stroke than those with preserved renal function, and they benefit more from carotid endarterectomy, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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SSRIs Linked to Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which warrants caution when prescribing these drugs in patients at elevated risk for this type of bleeding, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Weight Loss and Exercise Can Improve Cardiac Function

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise and losing weight improves cardiac function at any age, but some of those benefits can be lost when weight is regained, according to a pair of studies in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract- Farpour-Lambert
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract- de las Fuentes
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Heart Disease Risk Factors May Increase With Menopause

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The risk factors for coronary heart disease increase in women in the year before and the year after their final menstrual period (FMP), making that transition a crucial time to monitor lipid profiles and lifestyle risk factors, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Post-Myocardial Infarction Bleeding Risk Examined

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients receiving antithrombotic drugs post heart attack, the risk of hospitalization for bleeding increases as the number of drugs increases, according to a study in the Dec. 12 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Treatment After Stenting Affects Thrombosis Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents, 24 months of treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is associated with a lower risk of very late thrombosis than a shorter treatment regimen, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Atrial Fibrillation Type Affects Outcomes for Heart Condition

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute coronary syndromes who develop new-onset atrial fibrillation have worse short-term outcomes, while a history of atrial fibrillation is associated with higher long-term mortality, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Myocardial Velocities Differ Based on Age and Gender

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Left ventricle velocities determined by magnetic resonance tissue phase mapping show differences based on gender and age, according to a study published online Dec. 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
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Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Judging Method Evaluated

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating the appropriateness of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is possible in a clinical setting using an automated system, which may help reduce imaging overuse, according to research published online Dec. 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Patients Often Lack Knowledge of Their Own Medications

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients routinely under-report, or even over-report, their outpatient and inpatient medications, and should be included in hospital medication management to improve safety, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
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Two Diets Linked to Similar Insulin-Sensitivity Effect

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets had similar effects on insulin sensitivity in overweight individuals, but the latter diet was linked to a possible detrimental effect on vascular health, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
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Young Cancer Survivors Face Later Cardiovascular Risks

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer in childhood or adolescence substantially increases the risk of a cardiac condition later in life, according to a study published online Dec. 8 in BMJ.

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FDA Issues Recommendations to Prevent Excess CT Radiation

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Following news that 206 patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles were overexposed to radiation during computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging over an 18-month period, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued interim recommendations to help prevent similar incidents.

Press Release
Initial Notification
Issue a Voluntary Report to the FDA's MedWatch

Study Explores Genetics of Microalbuminuria in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, the Ala12 allele of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-γ2 (PPAR-γ2) may reduce the risk of persistent microalbuminuria, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
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Carcinogen Levels Similar in Herbal, Regular Cigarettes

MONDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers of regular cigarettes and herbal cigarettes -- products containing tobacco and extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs that are gaining popularity in China -- have similar levels of nicotine and carcinogens, according to research published in the December issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Lipid Levels Associated With Pregnancy Complications

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of triglycerides during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus or preeclampsia, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Guidance for Platelet Therapy Before Surgery Provided

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease who need an elective endoscopic gastrointestinal procedure with a high risk of bleeding, cessation of antiplatelet treatment should be avoided for at least six months after undergoing revascularization and stent placement, according to a review in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Beta 2 Adrenergic Agonist Use During Pregnancy Examined

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The use of beta 2 adrenergic agonist medications in pregnancy can disrupt the fetus's sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity, possibly resulting in autism spectrum disorders, poor cognition, impaired motor function, psychiatric problems, high blood pressure and poor school performance, according to a review published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Weight Loss Can Reduce Apnea Disease Severity

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Obese men with obstructive sleep apnea who lost significant weight on a stringent diet markedly reduced the severity of their disease in comparison with a control group that did not diet, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast-Feeding May Protect Against Metabolic Syndrome

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women who breast-feed -- including those with a history of gestational diabetes -- may have a significantly decreased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in Diabetes: A Journal of the American Diabetes Association.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Prevalent After Liver Transplant

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive liver transplants are at high risk for developing metabolic syndrome and resulting cardiovascular complications, but the impact on mortality and long-term survival are inconclusive, according to a review in the December Liver Transplantation.

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Diabetes in Pregnancy Hikes Risk for Metabolic Syndrome

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT) are at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome after they deliver their infants, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Door-to-Balloon Alliance Has Reached Treatment Target

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The national quality campaign, the Door-to-Balloon Alliance, has succeeded in reaching the goal of 75 percent of patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival at hospital, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Stem Cells May Improve Outcomes After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Perfusing stem cells into the heart to promote repair after a heart attack is safe and improves outcomes such as cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary function, left ventricular function and overall symptoms, according to a study in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital Report Cards Seldom Lead to Improved Cardiac Care

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Issuing public report cards on hospitals did not result in significant improvements in cardiac care, according to a Canadian study in the Dec. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was released early online to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, held from Nov. 14 to 18 in Orlando, Fla.

Abstract
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New Self-Assessment Tool for Undiagnosed Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers from Cornell University have developed a new risk-scoring model and simple self-assessment survey that can identify people who should be medically screened for diabetes, according to a study reported in the Dec. 1 Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Enzyme Therapy Brings Relief in Fabry's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Fabry's disease improved their cardiac hypertrophy, reduced their pain, and improved their quality of life after five years of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Patient Participation Affects Medical Decision Making

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with increased responsibility for medical decision making may be less likely to accept risky treatment options, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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High-Dose Statins Found to Improve Cardio Outcomes

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- High-dose statin treatment reduces the incidence of serious cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Southern Residence Linked to Increased Stroke Mortality

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Birth in a Stroke Belt state and adult residence there are associated with stroke mortality risk, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Women Researchers Lag Behind Men in Grant Awards

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Female physicians with a proven interest in research are less likely to receive prestigious research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) than are male physicians, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Links Exercise to Vasculoprotective Effects

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In mice as well as humans, exercise helps regulate telomere-stabilizing proteins and prevent stress-induced vascular apoptosis, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of Circulation.

Abstract
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