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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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December 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: January 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for December 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Precautions and Training Can Reduce Scalpel Injuries

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although less common than needle-stick injuries, cuts from scalpels also put operating room personnel at risk and can be reduced by closely following safety precautions and taking advantage of new technology, according to a study in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Psychotropic Medications Linked to Pregnancy Outcomes

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women, the use of psychotropic medications, especially benzodiazepines, is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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LDL Cholesterol Not the Only Culprit in Heart Disease

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Though low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is usually the primary target of lipid-lowering therapies, high levels of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides, and a high total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio also carry an elevated risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Dec. 29/Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Antidepressants Reduce Odds of Suicidal Teens' Readmission

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Suicidal adolescents who are prescribed an antidepressant medication on discharge from the hospital are far less likely to be readmitted than those who are not given the drug, but patients who leave with three or more drugs from different drug classes are more likely to end up back in the hospital, according to a retrospective cohort study published in the December issue of The Annals of Pharmacotherapy.

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Therapy Found Ineffective for Chronic Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is not recommended for treating chronic low back pain, though it appears effective in treating the pain of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, according to an American Academy of Neurology guideline published online Dec. 30 in Neurology.

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H1N1 Transmissibility Similar to Other Flu Viruses

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus proved to be less transmissible within households than viruses that caused previous pandemics, according to a study published in the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, while a second study of an outbreak in a school found that the natural history of the virus was similar to that of other flu viruses.

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Discharge Planning Measures May Not Cut Readmissions

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that collate and make publicly available discharge planning data do not necessarily have lower readmission rates than those that do not collate the data, according to a study in the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Study Assesses Safety of Figitumumab in Sarcoma

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Figitumumab -- a fully human IgG2 monoclonal antibody -- appears safe for use in sarcoma, with observable anti-tumor activity, according to research published online Dec. 24 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Omeprazole, Surgery Found Effective for Reflux Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, more patients stayed in clinical remission after anti-reflux surgery than with long-term omeprazole, though surgery was associated with postoperative complaints, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Study Sheds Light on Factors Involved in Brain Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The transcription factors C/EBPβ and Stat3 appear to work together to trigger and regulate the mesenchymal transformation seen in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), according to research published online Dec. 23 in Nature.

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Declines Found in Diabetes-Related Renal Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with diabetes, the incidence of diabetes-related end-stage renal disease (ESRD) declined in recent years, which suggests that efforts to prevent ESRD are successful, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Family Medical History Sharing With Adopters Debated

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- More specific adoption guidelines on the sharing of family medical history information with adoptive parents are needed to ensure the welfare of the adoptee and family medical record confidentiality, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Usefulness Examined

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV) may be useful in identifying men with clinically significant prostate cancer, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Efficacy of Glyburide for Gestational Diabetes Studied

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In women with gestational diabetes, glyburide is more effective than metformin for achieving glycemic control, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Possibly Dangerous

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with renal function impairment, the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents is risky because it can lead to the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, according to a study in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Ultrasound Detects Shoulder Dislocation After Birth Injury

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound can be used to detect a posterior shoulder dislocation in infants 3 to 6 months old with a permanent brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI), according to a study in the January issue of Radiology.

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Part-Time Ob-Gyn Faculty Projected to Increase

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The number of full-time faculty in obstetrics and gynecology has more than doubled since the 1970s, although the number of part-time faculty is projected to increase in the next five years, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Operating Room Nurses Must Know Heart Failure Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Perioperative nurses caring for patients requiring surgical treatment for heart failure need a working knowledge of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of chronic heart failure, according to an article in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Nausea and Vomiting Found Common Heart Attack Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) that occurs in both inferior and anterior AMIs, but the frequency of these symptoms are unlikely related to the infarct location, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Low-Level Laser Therapy for Body Sculpting Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Low-level laser therapy can reduce the circumference of certain areas of the body by reducing the adipose tissue layer, according to a study in the December issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Medical Device Studies for Premarket Approval Assessed

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Premarket approval (PMA) of cardiovascular medical devices based on early-stage studies are typically not statistically powered adequately and may potentially be biased, according to a study in the Dec. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Ginkgo biloba May Not Reduce Cognitive Decline in Adults

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ginkgo biloba, an herbal extract used to prevent memory loss and cognitive decline, was not effective in reducing the incidence of cognitive decline in individuals 72 to 96 years of age with normal brain function or mild cognitive impairment, according to the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory study published in the Dec. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Telemedicine Technology in Intensive Care Units Evaluated

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of telemedicine (tele) technology to remotely monitor multiple intensive care units (ICUs) at different hospital locations is unlikely associated with improvements in patient mortality rates, complications and length of hospital stay, according to an observational study published in the Dec. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Drugs Not Linked to β-Cell Improvement in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of insulin, exenatide, and the immunosuppressant daclizumab doesn't lead to improved function of surviving β-cells in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Immunocompromised Patients Need Aggressive Flu Treatment

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hematologic malignancies who develop seasonal or H1N1 influenza, aggressive treatment may be required, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Blood.

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Life Years Lost Due to Pneumoconiosis Increasing

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The number of potential years of life lost due to coal workers' pneumoconiosis has been increasing since 2002, and preventive measures should be stepped up, according to a report published in the Dec. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Tool Assesses Cardiac Death Risk in Heart Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Duke University researchers have developed a tool to stratify risk among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and identify those at highest risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a report in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Maternal Occupation May Impact Risk for Birth Defects

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Certain occupations may be either positively or negatively associated with one or more birth defects, according to a large population-based case-control study in the January issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Metabolic Syndrome and Heart Disease Risk in Men Studied

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, and this applies regardless of their body mass index, although those without metabolic syndrome who are overweight or obese are also at increased risk, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in Circulation.

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Progenitor Cells May Counter Chemotherapy Damage

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- It may be possible to prevent cardiomyopathy caused by chemotherapy by obtaining cardiac progenitor cells before initiating treatment and using them for prevention or management of heart failure, according to the findings of a study in rats published online Dec. 28 in Circulation.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Affluent Children Examined

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiorespiratory fitness among 10-year-old children continues to decline at an alarming rate, mostly independent of changes in body mass index (BMI), at least in girls, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Lower Among Statin Users

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In men preparing to undergo radical prostatectomy for cancer, those using statins have lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA), according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Flu-Related School Closures Have Big Impact on Families

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one-third of parents whose children's schools close due to an outbreak of influenza have to take time off work to provide child care, but the vast majority of parents still support the decision to close, according to a report published in the Dec. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Ultrasound-Guided Injection Can Benefit Lateral Hip Pain

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with gluteus medius tendinopathy, peritendinous ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection may be an effective treatment, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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CT Preferred in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, nearly all emergency physicians and radiologists prefer computed tomography, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Claustrophobia Common Cause of Refusing Breast Screening

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Only about 60 percent of women at high risk of breast cancer who are undergoing regular mammography and ultrasound screenings agree to supplemental screening by magnetic resonance imaging, with claustrophobia being the most common reason, according to a study in the January issue of Radiology.

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Statins Found to Be Beneficial in Congestive Heart Failure

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with heart failure, statins are safe, improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and decrease the risk of hospitalization for worsening heart failure, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Review Discusses Anti-HIV Benefits of Male Circumcision

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Findings from three randomized trials in Africa lend support to the use of adult male circumcision to reduce the incidence of HIV, according to a review published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Technique Found Effective, Safe in Spinal Stabilizations

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing spinal stabilization, intraoperative computed tomography in combination with neuronavigation improves the accuracy of screw placement, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

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H1N1-Affected Lungs From Deceased Show Damage

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all patients who died of H1N1 flu show evidence of lung damage and an aberrant immune response, according to a study in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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History of Foot Ulcers Can Increase Mortality in Diabetes

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who have a history of developing foot ulcers are at higher risk of death than those who do not have a history, and should be more closely monitored by clinicians, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Certain Medications May Alter Quad Screen Results

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A pregnant woman's use of certain prescription drugs may skew results of the standard Quad screening and increase the rate of screen-positives for neural tube defects, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Air Pollution Linked to Pneumonia in the Elderly

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) In the elderly, exposure to high levels of air pollution is associated with a higher risk of being hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a study in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Longer Maternity Leave Found Beneficial for Working Mothers

FRIDAY, Dec. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Female urologists who take nine weeks or more of maternity leave are more likely to report satisfaction with leave arrangements than their counterparts who take less time off; however, they often take a shorter postnatal break due to financial and peer-group pressures, according to a study in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Mental and Physical Activity Can Boost Cognitive Function

FRIDAY, Dec. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Elders at risk for cognitive impairment can improve cognitive function with increased mental and physical activity, according to a study in the December issue of the Journals of Gerontology.

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Flu Vaccine for Seniors Approved

THURSDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fluzone High-Dose, a seasonal flu vaccine for people 65 and older, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the agency said in a news release.

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Statins May Not Target All Lipid Abnormalities

THURSDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although statin therapy is effective at lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, it has no effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Nearly 50 percent of new statin users may require additional therapy to achieve optimal lipid levels, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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2009 H1N1 Took High Toll on Pregnant Women, Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic took a high toll on pregnant or recently-pregnant women and on children, according to a pair of studies from California and Argentina published online Dec. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Novel Gene Linked to Early-Onset Asthma in Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a novel gene linked to early-onset asthma, with different alleles causing the predisposition in children of European and African descent, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Novel Gene Variants Associated With Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered two novel gene variants that are linked to increased lipoprotein(a) levels and increased risk of coronary disease, according to a study in the Dec. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Drug Treatments Compared in Bipolar Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Bipolar disorder patients are less likely to have a relapse if they take lithium monotherapy or lithium combined with valproate than if they take valproate alone, but there is no evidence to support the use of combination therapy over lithium alone, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in The Lancet.

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Health Impact of Body Mass Index May Be Misleading

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse impact of low body mass index (BMI) on risk of respiratory disease and lung cancer mortality may be overstated, while the negative impact of high BMI on cardiovascular disease mortality may be underestimated, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Study Evaluates Postnatal Depression Screening

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Routine screening for postnatal depression is not cost-effective, largely because of the expense incurred in treating women with an incorrect postnatal depression diagnosis, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Over 85s Function Well Despite Disease and Disability

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Elders over the age of 85 report good health and functional ability despite the fact that they have to contend with a range of diseases and disabilities; however, as the fastest growing segment of the world's population, the health needs of future generations of over 85s represent a profound challenge, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Uric Acid Concentrations May Affect Pregnancy Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In normotensive pregnant women, high uric acid concentrations in mid-pregnancy are associated with insulin resistance and lower birth weights, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Ethnic, Racial Disparities Seen in Florida Melanoma Cases

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In Florida, the incidence of melanoma is rapidly increasing among white non-Hispanics and white Hispanics, and there is a significant racial disparity in the proportion of cases presenting with advanced disease, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Scanner Identifies Many Coronary Artery Stenoses

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The 64-MDCT scanner technology can accurately identify coronary artery stenoses in many (but not all) patients, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help Brain Cope With Overload

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Low intake of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the brain's ability to handle sensory overload, which could explain some of the symptoms seen in conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and attention-deficit disorder, according to an animal study published in the December issue of Behavioral Neuroscience.

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H1N1 Flu Waning, but Many Vaccine Doses Unused

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although the number of cases of people infected with H1N1 influenza continues to decline and the vaccine supply is now plentiful, not enough people have been inoculated, a top U.S. health official said during a Dec. 22 press briefing held by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Cycling Not Linked to Effect on Prostate-Specific Antigen

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Bicycle riding at a professional level doesn't influence serum levels of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA), according to research published in the December issue of Urology.

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Factors Linked to Bone Loss With Contraceptive Identified

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take the contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) are at higher risk of bone loss if they smoke, consume insufficient amounts of calcium, or have never had a child, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Coxibs May Inhibit Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Celecoxib and other coxibs may interfere with the antiplatelet activity of low-dose aspirin, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Chronic Maxillary Sinus Disease Linked to Allergy

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic disease of the maxillary sinuses (CDMS) is often associated with nasal allergy and may be monitored by radiography and ultrasound, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Contraceptives Have Benefits Beyond Pregnancy Prevention

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal contraceptives have useful non-contraceptive benefits, including prevention of endometrial and ovarian cancer and treating menstruation-related disorders, according to an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin published in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Gene Mutation Impact on Pregnancy Outcomes Assessed

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most inherited thrombophilia mutations are not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, with the exception of mutations in the prothrombin gene, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Severe H1N1 Infection Linked to Elevated Cytokine Levels

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients with severe novel H1N1 virus (nvH1N1) infection at 10 Spanish hospitals had high levels of the Th17 and Th1 cytokines, indicating either a robust immune response to the infection or an over-response similar to that found in autoimmune diseases, according to research published online Dec. 11 in Critical Care.

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Cytologic Regression Common in Some Gynecologic Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In women with atypical squamous cells of unknown significance and a negative human papillomavirus (HCII) test, nearly all achieve cytologic regression within two years, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Glycemic Index Education Helps Manage Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Educating people with type 2 diabetes about how to incorporate foods with a lower glycemic index into their diets results in improvements in weight, serum glucose levels, and insulin sensitivity, according to a study in Public Health Nutrition.

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Study Assesses Cardiac Rehab Impact on Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare beneficiaries with coronary heart disease who have exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation sessions have lower odds of death and myocardial infarction on a dose-dependent basis, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

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High-Density Lipoprotein Pros Missing for Diabetes Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The vasoprotective effects of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) seen in healthy people are absent in those with type 2 diabetes, but the impact of diabetes can be mitigated with extended-release niacin therapy, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

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Bystander Resuscitation Found to Rarely Cause Injury

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on directions are unlikely to sustain an injury as a result, even if they are not in arrest, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Circulation.

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Surveillance Can Reduce Treatment in Mild Hip Dysplasia

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In infants with mildly dysplastic hips, active surveillance for six weeks, as opposed to immediate abduction splinting can reduce the need for treatment yet lead to similar results at 1 year of age, according to research published online Dec. 21 in Pediatrics.

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CRP Levels Linked to Heart Disease, but Causality Unlikely

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- C-reactive protein (CRP) blood concentration is associated with risk of a range of diseases, including heart attack, stroke, cancer death and chronic lung disease, but most of the associations between CRP levels and heart disease are explained by risk factors already known to cause heart disease, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in The Lancet.

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Cocaine Use Likely Cause of Agranulocytosis Clusters

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Four separate clusters of agranulocytosis may potentially be linked to the ingestion of a veterinary drug, levamisole, which is commonly used as an added ingredient during cocaine manufacturing, according to a study published in the Dec. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Policy Statement Addresses Child Abuse, Neglect Issues

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should be aware of their legal rights and responsibilities when child abuse or neglect is suspected in a clinical setting, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement published online Dec. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Single H1N1 Vaccine Dose Likely Safe and Effective

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A single dose of influenza A(H1N1) vaccination is effective and safe in infants and children 6 months to less than 9 years of age, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gefitinib Found Beneficial in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, may provide longer progression-free survival as compared to standard platinum doublet chemotherapy with cisplatin and docetaxel, according to a Japanese study published online Dec. 21 in The Lancet.

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Prenatal Aspirin Not Linked to Adverse Infant Outcomes

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Among infants born preterm, low-dose aspirin (LDA) during pregnancy is not associated with fetal or infant deaths, infant cerebral damage, or brain development disorders, according to research published online Dec. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Risk of Neurologic Deficit Right After Spinal Surgery Low

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The likelihood of developing a major neurologic deficit immediately after spinal surgery is low, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Parents Not Stressed by Child's Genetic Risk for Diabetes

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with diabetes-associated autoantibodies did not report an increased level of stress until there was an actual diabetes diagnosis, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Resistance Exercise Benefits Elderly Overweight Men

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A regimen of resistance exercise two or three times a week appears to be an effective approach to weight management and metabolic control in elderly overweight men, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Antidepressants Not Found to Increase Heart Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking antidepressants, whether they are tricyclic medications or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are not at increased risk of coronary heart disease compared to their counterparts not taking the drugs, but there is a modestly higher risk of mortality and stroke, according to a study in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cost of Treatment for Heart Disease and Stroke Increasing

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated cost of treatment for cardiovascular disease and stroke in the United States in 2010 is estimated to be $503.2 billion, a 5.8 percent increase over the previous year, according to the American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics -- 2010 Update, published online Dec. 17 in Circulation.

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Aspirin Benefits Seem Similar Regardless of Diabetes Status

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The benefit of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events and death appears to be similar in people with and without diabetes, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder Prevalence Increases

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Improved documentation and identification of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) may have contributed to a rise in prevalence from 2002 to 2006, but an increased risk of developing an ASD should not be discounted, according to a surveillance summary published Dec. 18 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Melanoma-Associated Retinopathy Biomarkers Found

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of antibodies to aldolase A and aldolase C proteins may be useful as markers of melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), while other antibodies may indicate if the disease has an autoimmune component, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Twins' Academic Success and Classroom Situation Studied

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In twin children, sharing or not sharing classrooms during primary school years does not affect academic achievement, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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SIRT1 Alleles Linked to Reduced Obesity Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A Dutch study has found that two alleles of the SIRT1 gene are linked to less weight gain over time and decreased risk of obesity, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Amino Acids Found to Restore Function After Brain Injury

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Feeding amino acids to mice who have had a traumatic injury to a part of the brain important for learning and memory restores neural activity and cognitive function, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Most Stroke Survivors Take an Antithrombotic Agent

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A large proportion of stroke survivors used antithrombotic agents during a recent period, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Improvement Threshold Defines Low Back Pain Success

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low back pain, a successful outcome may be defined as at least a 50 percent improvement on the Modified Oswestry disability index, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of Spine.

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Stroke Education Program Improves Student Knowledge

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A stroke education program for middle-school students in a largely Hispanic population, which has a higher incidence of stroke than other groups, improves knowledge of stroke signs and treatment, according to a study published online in Health Promotion Practice.

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Animals and Food May Be a Reservoir for E. coli

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Animals and food may be a reservoir for pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria, according to two studies in the January issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Diverting Non-Urgent Cases Cuts Emergency Wait Times

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department wait times can be significantly reduced if non-urgent follow-up cases are diverted to a satellite clinic instead of being treated in the emergency department, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Dramatic Increase in Myopia in Recent Decades

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of myopia has increased dramatically in the United States over the past three decades, according to a study in the December issue of the Archi

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