Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

January 2010 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Brain Vessel Disease May Help Predict ESRD in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes who have cerebral microvascular disease are more likely to develop renal disease, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Packed Lunches Measured Against School Meal Criteria

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lunches that British children bring to school from home typically fall short of the standards for meals that schools provide, according to research published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Intensive Glycemic Control May Spike Diabetes Mortality

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus that drives the patient's glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level too low, or insufficient treatment that leaves it too high, both increase mortality risk, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Serotonergic Drugs May Delay Lactation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In new mothers, the use of medications affecting the balance of serotonin may have an adverse effect on lactation, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Links Childhood Obesity to Inflammatory Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children who have not yet developed features of the metabolic syndrome are likely to show abnormal markers of inflammation and prothrombosis, which could increase their later risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Medicare Copayments Affect Care Usage

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients, increasing copayments for ambulatory care may result in adverse health consequences and increased health care spending, according to a study in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Flame Retardant Linked to Reduced Fertility

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A class of flame retardants is associated with reduced fertility, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
Full Text

Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet Gets Better Results Than Diet Pill

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet produces similar outcomes to the weight-loss drug orlistat and a low fat diet in terms of weight loss, serum lipid profile and blood sugar, but it is more effective at lowering blood pressure, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Extreme Obesity Can Be Treated in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Non-surgical weight-loss programs delivered in a primary care setting can yield results with extremely obese patients, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Issues Recall of Nipro Medical's Infusion Needles

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Class I recall of Exel/Exelint Huber needles, Exel/Exelint Huber Infusion Sets, and Exel/Exelint "Securetouch+" Safety Huber Infusion Sets, manufactured by Nipro Medical Corporation for Exelint International Corporation.

Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Victoza Sanctioned for Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Victoza (liraglutide) has been approved to treat type 2 diabetes in some adults, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a news release.

FDA

Physical Activity Ups Women's Odds of Healthy Aging

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who follow a program of exercise are less likely to have falls and can improve bone mineral density compared to their non-exercising counterparts, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while another study found that higher levels of physical activity in middle age are associated with better health later in life.

Abstract - Kemmler
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Sun
Full Text

Insulin Syringe Recalled Because of Defective Needle

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- According to a Jan. 21 press release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Nipro Medical Corporation has voluntarily recalled all of its GlucoPro Insulin Syringes because of a defect that may cause the needle to detach from the syringe, resulting in its being stuck in the insulin vial, pushed back into the syringe, or lodged in the patient's skin.

Safety Alert
Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Common Chemicals Linked to Risk of Thyroid Problems

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High serum levels of the widely used chemicals perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoroctane sulphonate (PFOS) are associated with thyroid disease in adults, according to research published Jan. 20 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cortisol Level Shows Effect of Stress on Low-Income Youth

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children from low socioeconomic status families have a steeper trajectory of cortisol secretion than their counterparts from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds, which may leave them vulnerable to health problems when they get older, according to a study in the January issue of Psychological Science.

Abstract
Full Text

Mail-Order Pharmacy Use May Improve Drug Adherence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who refill prescriptions for diabetes medications by mail order have higher rates of drug adherence than their counterparts who refill at local pharmacies, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

Abstract
Full Text

FDA Warns Certain Patients Against Using Meridia

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The weight-loss pill sibutramine hydrochloride (Meridia) can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke in people with a history of heart problems and, therefore, should not be used in those patients, according to a Jan. 21 announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Degree of Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity increases the risk of stroke independently of race and gender, although the risk appears to be largely explained by associated hypertension and diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Red Yeast Rice Efficacy Comparable to Statin

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The alternative therapy red yeast rice performs comparably to the lipid-lowering drug pravastatin in reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in patients who had previously had to discontinue statin therapy because of muscle pain, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Standards Revised for Diabetes Self-Management Education

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A task force, including diabetes educators, researchers and clinicians, has produced the first update of the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) since 2000. The new standards have been published in a supplement of the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Reducing Dietary Salt Could Substantially Impact Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest reductions in Americans' dietary salt could substantially reduce cardiovascular events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke, and should be a public health goal, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Diabetes Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Lung Diseases

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The declining lung function of patients with diabetes puts them at increased risk of a range of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia and asthma, but not lung cancer, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sleep Apnea Severity Linked to Glucose Control in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the severity of the condition is positively correlated with poorer glucose control, according to a study published online Dec. 17 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bariatric Surgery Benefits Most Morbidly Obese Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Gastric bypass surgery improves life expectancy for most morbidly obese patients, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that Medicare beneficiaries have improved outcomes after expanded coverage for bariatric surgery.

Abstract - Schauer
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Nguyen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Napping Habit May Affect Diabetes Risk in Elders

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who nap in the day or who have a short night's sleep may be at increased risk of diabetes, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Diary More Flexible Than Carbohydrate Counting

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new telemedicine system is as effective and more flexible than standard carbohydrate counting in treating adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metformin May Worsen Peripheral Neuropathy

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin treatment of type 2 diabetes is associated with vitamin B12 deficiency and more severe peripheral neuropathy, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Poor Cognition in Midlife

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome that persists over years is associated with worse cognitive function in late middle age, which can be partially accounted for by occupational position, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Potassium Channels in Muscles May Offer Obesity Target

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Targeting a mechanism involved in energy expenditure in muscles may help treat obesity, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of Cell Metabolism.

Full Text

Gender May Affect CVD Risk Factor Management

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In primary care, the sex of the physician or patient has little overall effect on the number of patients who meet cardiovascular disease guideline-specific goals, but there are some gender-dependent stylistic differences in risk factor management, according to a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required

High Caloric Intake Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of developing diabetic retinopathy if they have a high caloric intake, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology. In a related study in the same issue, signs of retinopathy are present in Asians without diabetes, with the higher risk associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

Abstract - Roy
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Jeganathan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Overweight and Obesity May Be Stabilizing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although the prevalence of overweight and obesity is still high in adults and children in the United States, the rates appear to be stabilizing in the past decade, according to two studies published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Flegal
Full Text - Flegal
Abstract - Ogden
Full Text - Ogden
Editorial

Reduced-Energy Meals May Under-State Energy Content

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Meals sold as reduced energy by supermarkets and restaurants may under-state the caloric content by a significant amount, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Combined With Calcium May Cut Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of vitamin D and calcium significantly reduces the risk of fractures, but supplementation with the vitamin alone does not, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Funding Linked to State Obesity Legislation

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- States receiving funding from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's obesity-related programs were more likely to pass obesity-related legislation, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Greater Time in Front of TV Linked to Higher Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- More time spent watching television is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to research published online Jan. 11 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Viral Infection Associated With Autoimmune Diabetes in Rats

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Certain viruses -- including Kilham rat virus (KRV) and rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) -- are associated with autoimmune diabetes in rats, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

HIV Infection May Increase Fracture Risk in Women

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal HIV-positive women are more likely to have low bone density and high bone turnover, possibly increasing their risk of fractures, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fat Mass May Have Greater Effect on Bone Mass in Girls

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- While lean body mass is the main determinant of bone mass in both boys and girls, fat mass has a greater influence on bone mass in girls, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin and Drug Combination May Benefit Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The active form of vitamin D selectively reduces the production of aromatase, which catalyzes the production of estrogen, in breast cancers, and, when combined with aromatase inhibitors, further reduces tumor growth, according to a study in the January issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study May Explain Cardiac Benefit of Green Tea

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A component of green tea reduces the production of a vasoconstrictor in endothelial cells, possibly explaining the beneficial cardiovascular effects of green tea, according to a study in the January issue of Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Routine Child Exams and Tests May Predict Future Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or hyperglycemia may be predictable in children through routine pediatric exams and lab tests, according to a pair of studies in the January Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Morrison
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Tian
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Disease Burden of Obesity Matches That of Smoking

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost, the overall disease burden attributable to obesity has matched, and even slightly exceeded, that attributable to smoking, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Severe Kidney Disease Needs Complex Management

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Aggressive management is required for patients with stage IV chronic kidney disease, according to an article in the Jan. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Retraining Device Helps Obese Children Change Eating Habits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized device can help obese adolescents change their eating habits, and is a useful adjunct to lifestyle changes to lose weight, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Mouse Study Assesses Use of Tetracycline in Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Tetracycline reduces the progression of diabetes in lines of mice that develop the disease along with islet β-cell dysfunction and β-cell loss, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combining Psychotropic Drugs Becoming More Common

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Polypharmacy combining different psychotropic medications is becoming more common, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a second study found that diabetes warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration added to second-generation antipsychotic drugs have not resulted in an increase in testing or monitoring of at-risk patients.

Abstract - Mojtabai
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Morrato
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Offspring of Patients Assessed

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among offspring born to parents with late-onset type 1 diabetes, the risk of the disease varies according to the gender of the parent in combination with the age of diabetes onset in the parent, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Quitting Smoking May Up Short-Term Risk of Diabetes

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking cessation is associated with a short-term increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and strategies to encourage quitting smoking should include diabetes prevention and early detection measures for at-risk patients, according to a study in the Jan. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Use of A1C in the Diagnosis of Diabetes Supported

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in the American Diabetes Association's new clinical practice recommendations include the use of A1C in diagnosing diabetes and identifying those at higher risk of future diabetes, according to a position statement published in a supplement to the January issue of Diabetes Care.

online resource
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2010 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: January 2010 Briefing - Dermatology Next: January 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.