Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

January 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Approach Studied in Seniors

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of computed tomographic (CT) colonography appears safe and effective for colorectal cancer screening in older individuals, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pilot Study Finds Bacterial Vaginosis Self-Test Effective

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A self-test for vaginosis may enable women to accurately diagnose the condition and results in women seeking professional diagnosis and treatment, according to a study in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ulipristal Acetate Found Effective Emergency Contraception

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For women who require emergency contraception, ulipristal acetate may be an effective alternative to levonorgestrel, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rural and Urban Care Quality Compared for CAD

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for variables, hospital quality of care for coronary artery disease (CAD) in rural areas is on a par with care in urban areas, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

T Cells Linked to Skin Cancer After Kidney Transplant

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Components of the immune system, particularly high numbers of regulatory T cells, predict whether a kidney transplant recipient is likely to develop a type of skin cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Packed Lunches Measured Against School Meal Criteria

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lunches that British children bring to school from home typically fall short of the standards for meals that schools provide, according to research published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Clues Found to Pathogenesis of Lupus Kidney Complication

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infiltrating macrophages and interferons play a key role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis, a complication of lupus characterized by abnormal growth of kidney cells leading to kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Electromyography for Pedicle Screw Placement Assessed

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of triggered electromyography (EMG) may have more of a role in determining proper placement of lumbar than thoracic pedicle screws in pediatric deformity surgeries, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Examined in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of functional MRI to assess patterns of brain activation in adults and children with multiple sclerosis (MS) may offer insight into disease progression among these groups, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Policies on Newborn Hospital Discharge Updated

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The length of the hospital stay for healthy term newborns should be based on a range of factors unique to each mother-child pair, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Lifestyle Affects Incontinence Risk After Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In men who undergo radical prostatectomy, obesity and physical inactivity are associated with an increased prevalence of urinary incontinence, according to a study in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Patient Surveillance Needed to Reduce Nurse Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is common for nurses to commit errors in the course of their work, and nurse educators are urged to improve training in strategies to improve patient surveillance, according to a study in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Shown to Impact Incontinence Severity

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women with urinary incontinence have more severe symptoms than their overweight or normal weight counterparts, according to trial results published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

Pediatric Rheumatic Disease Mortality Rate Improving

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The overall and disease-specific mortality rates for pediatric rheumatic disease patients have improved compared with the findings of earlier research, according to a report in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text

Electrocardiogram Test for Long QT Syndrome Assessed

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The response of the QT interval to a sudden heart rate acceleration as seen on an electrocardiogram (ECG) offers diagnostic information helpful in the challenging diagnosis of long QT syndrome (LQTS), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Intensive Glycemic Control May Spike Diabetes Mortality

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus that drives the patient's glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level too low, or insufficient treatment that leaves it too high, both increase mortality risk, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Serotonergic Drugs May Delay Lactation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In new mothers, the use of medications affecting the balance of serotonin may have an adverse effect on lactation, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Supported by Evidence

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Psychodynamic psychotherapy, the treatment approach similar to, but less extensive than, full psychoanalysis, is efficacious and well-supported by scientific evidence, despite a perception that it lacks empirical support, according to an article published online Jan. 25 in the American Psychologist.

Full Text

Study Links Childhood Obesity to Inflammatory Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children who have not yet developed features of the metabolic syndrome are likely to show abnormal markers of inflammation and prothrombosis, which could increase their later risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Compares Methods of Measuring Contractions

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In women going through induced or augmented labor, monitoring contractions with an intrauterine pressure catheter doesn't reduce the rate of operative delivery compared to external monitoring, according to research published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Medicare Copayments Affect Care Usage

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients, increasing copayments for ambulatory care may result in adverse health consequences and increased health care spending, according to a study in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Rotavirus Vaccine Found to Be Effective in Africa and Mexico

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Human rotavirus vaccine significantly reduces the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis and diarrhea-related mortality, according to two studies in the Jan. 28 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Madhi
Full Text
Abstract - Richardson
Full Text
Editorial

Flame Retardant Linked to Reduced Fertility

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A class of flame retardants is associated with reduced fertility, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
Full Text

Insufficient Sleep May Be the Norm in High-School Students

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most American high-school students don't get enough sleep on the average school night, according to research published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Birth Weights Show Decline During Recent Period

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Birth weights among term births have declined in the United States in recent years, a trend not explained by maternal or neonatal factors or changes in induced labor or Caesarean delivery, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomarker May Benefit Risk Stratification in Older Adults

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are associated with the development of heart failure, as well as cardiovascular death, in older adults, according to research published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review of Enuresis in Over-5s Conducted

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nighttime bedwetting in children over the age of 5 years is a condition that requires proper evaluation and treatment, according to a report in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

New Coronary Angiography Method Provides 3-D Images

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A new method of coronary angiography provides largely high-quality three-dimensional images of the coronary arteries, often providing information not obtainable by two-dimensional projection imaging, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Impact of Hemodialysis-Induced Hemoglobin Release Studied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hemoglobin released after hemodialysis is associated with nitric oxide scavenging and worse endothelial function, according to a study in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet Gets Better Results Than Diet Pill

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet produces similar outcomes to the weight-loss drug orlistat and a low fat diet in terms of weight loss, serum lipid profile and blood sugar, but it is more effective at lowering blood pressure, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Extreme Obesity Can Be Treated in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Non-surgical weight-loss programs delivered in a primary care setting can yield results with extremely obese patients, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Issues Recall of Nipro Medical's Infusion Needles

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Class I recall of Exel/Exelint Huber needles, Exel/Exelint Huber Infusion Sets, and Exel/Exelint "Securetouch+" Safety Huber Infusion Sets, manufactured by Nipro Medical Corporation for Exelint International Corporation.

Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Insulin Treatments for Septic Shock Compared

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Among septic shock patients treated with hydrocortisone, intensive insulin therapy did not improve mortality compared to conventional insulin therapy, with or without the further addition of fludrocortisone, according to a study in the Jan. 27 Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Assesses Statin Efficacy in Pneumococcal Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of statins might help protect individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from pneumococcal disease, according to research published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Abstract
Full Text

Antibiotic Use for Acute Otitis Media Assessed

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A well-publicized clinical practice guideline in 2004 on acute otitis media (AOM) in children did not appear to increase the management of the problem without antibiotics, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Morphine Sulfate Solution Approved

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Morphine Sulfate Oral Solution has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat acute and chronic pain. Sanctioned doses are 100 milligrams per 5 mL and 20 milligrams per 1 mL, the agency said in a news release.

National Institutes of Health

Premature Births Not Reduced With Omega-3 Fatty Acids

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Among pregnant women with a history of premature delivery already taking 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate to reduce the risk of premature delivery, omega-3 fatty acids provide no additional benefit, according to a study in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Looks at Effect of Smoke on Infant Heart Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Early exposure to cigarette smoke may lead to a persistent reprogramming of infant blood pressure control mechanisms, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Botox Found Effective for Children With Cerebral Palsy

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for localized spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, according to a review in the Jan. 26 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text

Physical Activity May Preserve Cognitive Function in Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity can help an older person preserve their cognitive function and mental health, according to a pair of studies in the Jan. 25 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Etgen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Dechamps
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity Ups Women's Odds of Healthy Aging

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who follow a program of exercise are less likely to have falls and can improve bone mineral density compared to their non-exercising counterparts, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, while another study found that higher levels of physical activity in middle age are associated with better health later in life.

Abstract - Kemmler
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Sun
Full Text

Serum Procalcitonin Levels May Help Guide Antibiotic Use

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with suspected severe bacterial infection, employing antibiotics judiciously based on the serum levels of the calcitonin precursor hormone procalcitonin can reduce antibiotic exposure without increased mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Syringe Recalled Because of Defective Needle

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- According to a Jan. 21 press release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Nipro Medical Corporation has voluntarily recalled all of its GlucoPro Insulin Syringes because of a defect that may cause the needle to detach from the syringe, resulting in its being stuck in the insulin vial, pushed back into the syringe, or lodged in the patient's skin.

Safety Alert
Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Common Chemicals Linked to Risk of Thyroid Problems

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High serum levels of the widely used chemicals perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoroctane sulphonate (PFOS) are associated with thyroid disease in adults, according to research published Jan. 20 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Explores Alternative Medicine Use in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 8.7 million American adolescents and children used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in 2007, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Mixed-Handedness Linked to Scholastic Problems and ADHD

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Mix-handedness, an indication of atypical cerebral laterality, may be an early indicator of children who will have language and scholastic performance problems and possibly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Calorie Counts Affect Parents' Fast Food Choices for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- If they are aware of the calorie counts of fast food choices, parents will order lower-calorie foods for their young children, though they may not order lower-calorie foods for themselves, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

20 Percent of U.S. Youths Have Abnormal Lipid Levels

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- One in five 12- to 19-year-olds in the United States has at least one abnormal lipid level, which is a major risk factor for future heart disease, according to a study in the Jan. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Vitamin D Levels May Affect Risk of Colon Cancer

FRIDAY Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There is an inverse association between pre-diagnostic circulating levels of vitamin D and the risk of colorectal cancer, although more research is needed to see whether increasing vitamin D concentration could lower the risk of the cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Cortisol Level Shows Effect of Stress on Low-Income Youth

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children from low socioeconomic status families have a steeper trajectory of cortisol secretion than their counterparts from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds, which may leave them vulnerable to health problems when they get older, according to a study in the January issue of Psychological Science.

Abstract
Full Text

Mail-Order Pharmacy Use May Improve Drug Adherence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who refill prescriptions for diabetes medications by mail order have higher rates of drug adherence than their counterparts who refill at local pharmacies, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Later Toilet Training Linked to Childhood Urge Incontinence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Beginning toilet training in toddlers after the age of 32 months may increase the likelihood of later urge incontinence, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Pediatric Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Screening for Postpartum Depression Can Be Beneficial

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Many women experience depression during and after pregnancy and could benefit from screening and treatment, although there is not enough evidence to support a recommendation for universal screening, according to a committee opinion published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Malnutrition Studied in Babies Born to Child Brides

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born to women who were married as minors are at higher risk of malnutrition than those whose mothers were married at majority age, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

FDA Warns Certain Patients Against Using Meridia

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The weight-loss pill sibutramine hydrochloride (Meridia) can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke in people with a history of heart problems and, therefore, should not be used in those patients, according to a Jan. 21 announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Pediatric Prescribing and Administration Errors Assessed

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Errors in written prescription and administration of drugs on pediatric wards are common and warrant strategies to reduce the risk of serious harm, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Full Text

Palestinian Turmoil Linked to Domestic Abuse

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In the occupied Palestinian territory, intimate-partner violence is strongly associated with exposure to political violence, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Disease Now Main Cause of Death in Darfur Conflict

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2005, disease has replaced violence as the leading cause of death in Darfur, especially among displaced populations, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Degree of Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity increases the risk of stroke independently of race and gender, although the risk appears to be largely explained by associated hypertension and diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Found Effective During Spinal Deformity Surgery

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In adult patients undergoing lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy, treatment with aprotinin may be associated with significantly less blood loss than treatment with tranexamic acid, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery Revision Rates Likely Low

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing definitive spinal instrumented fusion for primary adult deformity, the revision rate may be relatively low, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Red Yeast Rice Efficacy Comparable to Statin

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The alternative therapy red yeast rice performs comparably to the lipid-lowering drug pravastatin in reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in patients who had previously had to discontinue statin therapy because of muscle pain, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hyaluronic Acid Found Helpful After Knee Arthroscopy

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with early osteoarthritis and a symptomatic meniscus tear, those who receive sodium hyaluronate injections after knee arthroscopy may experience more pain relief and functional recovery than those treated with arthroscopy alone, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Orthopedics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nurse Education Can Improve Elderly Pain Monitoring

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Barriers to timely documentation must be addressed and specific training given if nurses are to adhere to best practice in reporting patients' pain levels before and after analgesic treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Untreated Scoliosis Patients Show High Quality of Life

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In their 30s, patients with moderate idiopathic scoliosis report a good quality of life regardless of whether or not they were braced during adolescence, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Virus Testing Most Effective in Detecting Cervical Cancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Screening women 35 and older for human papillomavirus (HPV) is more effective than conventional cytology in detecting invasive cervical cancers, while HPV screening in younger women leads to over-diagnosis of precancerous lesions that often regress, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Higher Rate Than Estimated of H1N1 in U.K. Children

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, children were much more vulnerable to infection than older people and, therefore, should be the primary target group for vaccination, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Factors Help Predict Continued Opioid Use for Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic back pain are more likely to use opioid analgesics long term if they smoke and had non-surgical treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Transcatheter Aortic Procedure Assessed in High-Risk Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), using either transfemoral or transapical approaches, produces similar mortality, and both are viable alternatives for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at too high a risk for surgery, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Standards Revised for Diabetes Self-Management Education

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A task force, including diabetes educators, researchers and clinicians, has produced the first update of the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) since 2000. The new standards have been published in a supplement of the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Triple, Dual Restenosis Prevention Therapies Studied

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Antiplatelet therapy including aspirin, clopidogrel and cilostazol helps prevent late stenosis following stent placement better than standard therapy with only aspirin and clopidogrel, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coronary Events Not Uncommon on Vacation Cruises

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Passengers embarking on cruises who are at risk for cardiovascular events should have a pre-cruise medical evaluation and bring along a copy of their electrocardiogram if abnormal, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Emphysema Associated With Left Ventricular Issues

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A greater extent of emphysema and more airflow obstruction is linked with poorer left ventricular filling and reduced cardiac output, according to research published in the Jan. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Oral Drug to Be Effective in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, once-daily oral fingolimod is more effective than once-weekly intramuscular interferon injection at preventing relapses, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Acyclovir for Herpes Not Found to Reduce HIV Transmission

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of acyclovir to suppress herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2) infection does not appear to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1 from infected individuals to uninfected heterosexual partners, according to research published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Reducing Dietary Salt Could Substantially Impact Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest reductions in Americans' dietary salt could substantially reduce cardiovascular events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke, and should be a public health goal, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Heart-Assist System Approved for Severe Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A device that helps the heart's left ventricle pump blood in people who have severe heart failure but who aren't candidates for heart transplant has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

devices that help the heart beat

Diabetes Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Lung Diseases

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The declining lung function of patients with diabetes puts them at increased risk of a range of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia and asthma, but not lung cancer, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Survival Improving for Children With Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survival in children with at least one birth defect depends on the type of defect as well as the birth year and proportion of pregnancy terminations, possibly because pregnancies with the worst outlook are being terminated, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Low-Risk Criteria Help Guide Care for Infants With Fever

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In most cases, infants with fever who meet low-risk criteria should be closely observed but may not require antibiotics, sparing associated adverse events, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Serotonin-1A Receptor Gene Linked to Depression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model, researchers were able to manipulate the level of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors to affect both the mice's vulnerability to stress as well as their response to antidepressants, according to a study in the Jan. 14 issue of Neuron.

Abstract
Full Text

Toddlers With Burns Should Also Be Checked for Fractures

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with burns suspected to have been caused by abuse should also be routinely evaluated for fractures, according to an analysis published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chinese School Children Found to Have High Levels of Stress

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Primary school children in China's highly competitive education system commonly experience psychosomatic symptoms as a result of school pressure-related stress, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Full Text

Skin Cancer Checks Needed for Patients on Voriconazole

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving long-term treatment for fungal infections who show signs of photosensitivity or chronic photodamage should be monitored for skin cancer formation, according to an article published online Jan. 18 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Fluctuations May Predict Alzheimer's Severity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the presence of cognitive fluctuations, spontaneous alterations in cognition, attention, and arousal, may be associated with greater disease severity and poorer neuropsychological performance, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Linked to Less Change in Telomeres

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids are associated with a slower rate of telomere shortening in individuals with coronary artery disease, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Erectile Dysfunction May Not Aid Heart Disease Prediction

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), it does not appear to improve upon the prediction provided by the Framingham risk score, according to research published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rising Psoriasis Therapy Costs Far Outstrip Inflation

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The price of brand-name drugs, and thus the overall cost of treating systemic psoriasis, rose steeply from 2000 to 2008, with the average 66 percent price hike far outstripping the rate of inflation over the same period, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Periconditioning Associated With Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A strategy known as remote ischemic periconditioning (RIPC) may help prevent reperfusion injury to the heart during percutaneous coronary intervention, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cells Linked to Outcomes After Coronary Intervention

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Different subtypes of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are associated with different outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Palliative Surgery Benefits Weighed in Spinal Metastasis

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative surgery for spinal metastasis can deliver satisfaction to patients and their family members in terms of improved quality of life, including neurological improvement, reduced pain and longer patient survival, according to a study in the January issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Immunizations Confer Gastroenteritis Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A complete series of immunizations with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) offers highly effective protection against pediatric rotavirus acute gastroenteritis, while even a partial series offers substantial acute gastroenteritis protection, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tracheostomy Tubes Linked to Pediatric Constipation

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In children, tracheostomy tubes are associated with increased constipation, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

No Link Between Appendicitis and Viral Infection Found

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Appendicitis does not appear to be correlated with influenza or rotavirus infection, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Laser, Electrodesiccation for Cherry Angiomata Effective

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cherry angiomata can be successfully treated with electrodesiccation and laser, with the latter option producing the least treatment-related textural change to the skin, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract

Copyright © 2010 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: January 2010 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology Next: January 2010 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.