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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2010 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Brain Vessel Disease May Help Predict ESRD in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes who have cerebral microvascular disease are more likely to develop renal disease, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Imaging for Coronary Artery Disease Diagnosis Examined

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomographic (CT) angiography and first-pass magnetic resonance (MR) myocardial perfusion imaging provide complementary capabilities; the first to detect or rule out coronary artery disease (CAD), and the second to detect any resulting myocardial ischemia, according to a study in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Electromyography for Pedicle Screw Placement Assessed

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of triggered electromyography (EMG) may have more of a role in determining proper placement of lumbar than thoracic pedicle screws in pediatric deformity surgeries, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Examined in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of functional MRI to assess patterns of brain activation in adults and children with multiple sclerosis (MS) may offer insight into disease progression among these groups, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Increased Medicare Copayments Affect Care Usage

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients, increasing copayments for ambulatory care may result in adverse health consequences and increased health care spending, according to a study in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Morphine Sulfate Solution Approved

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Morphine Sulfate Oral Solution has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat acute and chronic pain. Sanctioned doses are 100 milligrams per 5 mL and 20 milligrams per 1 mL, the agency said in a news release.

National Institutes of Health

Botox Found Effective for Children With Cerebral Palsy

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for localized spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, according to a review in the Jan. 26 issue of Neurology.

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Physical Activity May Preserve Cognitive Function in Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity can help an older person preserve their cognitive function and mental health, according to a pair of studies in the Jan. 25 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Etgen
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Abstract - Dechamps
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Car Crash Trauma Often Under-Detected in Elderly

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are often under-triaged and inappropriately treated for injuries that go undetected, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
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Treatment of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Studied in Mice

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Two peptides can reverse learning deficits in grown mice due to prenatal exposure to alcohol in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome, according to a study in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Mixed-Handedness Linked to Scholastic Problems and ADHD

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Mix-handedness, an indication of atypical cerebral laterality, may be an early indicator of children who will have language and scholastic performance problems and possibly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Risk of Youth Soccer Injuries Higher Than for Other Sports

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Youth soccer carries a higher risk of injury than many other contact sports, with injuries such as concussion and musculoskeletal trauma occurring fairly commonly, according to a report published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Ampyra Approved for Adults With MS

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Dalfampridine (Ampyra) extended-release tablets have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have trouble walking.

this approval

Most Combat Zone Soldier Evacuations Not Battle Related

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, non-battle-related injuries and disease account for more medical evacuations of military personnel than combat injuries, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery Revision Rates Likely Low

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing definitive spinal instrumented fusion for primary adult deformity, the revision rate may be relatively low, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Factors Help Predict Continued Opioid Use for Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic back pain are more likely to use opioid analgesics long term if they smoke and had non-surgical treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Nurses Often Deeply Affected by Workplace Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses are deeply affected by errors they make in the intraoperative environment and need more guidance on what constitutes an error in order to encourage more open reporting, according to a study in the Jan. 10 issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Study Finds Oral Drug to Be Effective in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, once-daily oral fingolimod is more effective than once-weekly intramuscular interferon injection at preventing relapses, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Reducing Dietary Salt Could Substantially Impact Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest reductions in Americans' dietary salt could substantially reduce cardiovascular events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke, and should be a public health goal, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Survival Improving for Children With Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survival in children with at least one birth defect depends on the type of defect as well as the birth year and proportion of pregnancy terminations, possibly because pregnancies with the worst outlook are being terminated, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial

Serotonin-1A Receptor Gene Linked to Depression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model, researchers were able to manipulate the level of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors to affect both the mice's vulnerability to stress as well as their response to antidepressants, according to a study in the Jan. 14 issue of Neuron.

Abstract
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Cognitive Fluctuations May Predict Alzheimer's Severity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the presence of cognitive fluctuations, spontaneous alterations in cognition, attention, and arousal, may be associated with greater disease severity and poorer neuropsychological performance, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Palliative Surgery Benefits Weighed in Spinal Metastasis

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative surgery for spinal metastasis can deliver satisfaction to patients and their family members in terms of improved quality of life, including neurological improvement, reduced pain and longer patient survival, according to a study in the January issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Researchers Call for Reform of Opioid Prescription Practices

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving higher doses of prescribed opioids for chronic pain, overdoses are common, suggesting a need to reform prescribing practices, according to a study in the Jan. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

UV Light Helps Reduce Seizure-Like Activity in Rats

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) in conjunction with caged γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) can release the GABA and reduce seizure-like activity in an animal model of epilepsy, according to research published in the January issue of Epilepsia.

Abstract
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Metformin May Worsen Peripheral Neuropathy

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin treatment of type 2 diabetes is associated with vitamin B12 deficiency and more severe peripheral neuropathy, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Poor Cognition in Midlife

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome that persists over years is associated with worse cognitive function in late middle age, which can be partially accounted for by occupational position, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Higher Heart Rate Linked to Risk of Ischemic Heart Deaths

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with risk of death from ischemic heart disease, but, in women, physical activity may reduce this risk, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Imaging May Help Identify a Biomarker of Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Autistic children have right-hemisphere delays in their response to a range of auditory frequencies, suggesting abnormal maturation of the auditory system, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Autism Research.

Abstract
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Potassium Channels in Muscles May Offer Obesity Target

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Targeting a mechanism involved in energy expenditure in muscles may help treat obesity, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of Cell Metabolism.

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Antipsychotic Use in Elderly, Prescribing Rates Examined

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients newly admitted to nursing homes are more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics if the nursing home has a high prescribing rate for antipsychotics, according to a study in the Jan. 11 Archives of Internal Medicine. A related study determined that an FDA advisory on the use of atypical antipsychotics in elderly dementia patients resulted in decreased use.

Abstract - Chen
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Abstract - Dorsey
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Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Stroke Survivors Stop Taking Meds Within Two Years

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Many Swedish stroke survivors stop taking preventive medications in the first two years after their stroke, pointing out the need for interventions to improve patient persistence and prevent future strokes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Study Links Caregiving Strains to Increased Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The strain of caring for a disabled spouse probably increases the risk of stroke, particularly among African-American men, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Studies Find Exercise Helps Cognitive Function in Elderly

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise benefits cognitive functioning in the elderly, according to a pair of studies in the January issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract - Baker
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Abstract - Geda
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Stroke Care on Weekends, Weekdays Compared

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the notion that hospital emergency care on weekends is less aggressive than weekday care, the use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is higher on weekends than weekdays, according to a retrospective study of AIS care in Virginia published in the January issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Ionizing Radiation May Increase Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to ionizing radiation may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Subjective Cognitive Decline Often Sign of Worse to Come

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Subjective cognitive impairment is often a harbinger of future deterioration, according to a study in the January issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Abstract
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Spine Immobilization May Do More Harm Than Good

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of mortality for patients with penetrating trauma are doubled by the use of spine immobilization before transportation to hospital, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care.

Abstract
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Scan Can Find Small Cancers Undetected in Usual Evaluation

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) can detect certain small cancers early in some patients in whom standard evaluation has failed to detect disease, making earlier treatment possible, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Study Explores Relationship Between Migraine, Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), may share underlying genetic factors, according to research published online Jan. 13 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Overweight and Obesity May Be Stabilizing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although the prevalence of overweight and obesity is still high in adults and children in the United States, the rates appear to be stabilizing in the past decade, according to two studies published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Flegal
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Abstract - Ogden
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Editorial

Angiotensin Receptor Blockers May Help Prevent Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Angiotensin receptor blockers are associated with a significant reduction in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia, along with a slowing of the progression of the disease in those who already have dementia, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Combination Approach Found to Aid Knee Osteoarthritis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Both strength training and self-management are helpful to treat middle-aged patients with early knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

CETP Gene Linked to Reduced Risk of Dementia in Seniors

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene are associated with slower memory decline and lower risk of dementia in older adults, according to research published in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Statin Effect on Cholesterol Levels, Stroke Risk Analyzed

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Statin treatment is associated with a lower risk of stroke, with the reduction in stroke risk proportional to the reduction in cholesterol, according to a study in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Brain Scan Used in Difficult Parkinson's Disease Diagnoses

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A classification procedure using metabolic brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) can identify different forms of Parkinsonism early and with high accuracy, preventing misdiagnosis and ensuring correct treatment, according to a report published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Drink May Improve Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease show improvements in memory after taking a multi-nutrient drink designed to improve synapse formation, according to a study in the January issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Abstract
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Imetelstat Shows Potential for Prostate, Brain Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat may be useful in treating glioblastoma and prostate cancer, according to research published online Jan. 4 in Clinical Cancer Research and online Nov. 11 in the International Journal of Cancer.

Abstract - Study 1
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Abstract - Study 2
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Childhood Mistreatment Linked to Issues With Migraine

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A history of childhood mistreatment is common in individuals with migraine, and childhood abuse and neglect are associated with chronic headaches and likelihood of comorbid pain conditions, according to a series of studies in the January issue of Headache.

Abstract - Study 1
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Abstract - Study 2
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Abstract - Study 3
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New Marker Identified for Early Alzheimer's Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In healthy older adults, higher hippocampal mean diffusivity may help predict memory decline, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Beside Exams May Trump CT Scanning After Brain Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- After patients undergo open brain surgery, a simple bedside examination may be more effective at identifying serious complications than routine computed tomography (CT) scanning, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Imaging Finds Problems With Visual Function in Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, neuronal function along the dorsal visual pathway may be altered before function along the ventral visual pathway, according to research published in the January issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Self-Efficacy May Affect Patients' Levels of Fatigue

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors (BCS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are likely to report less fatigue as a result of physical activity if they have a strong sense of self-efficacy and are not depressed, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
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