Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

January 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Approach Studied in Seniors

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of computed tomographic (CT) colonography appears safe and effective for colorectal cancer screening in older individuals, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pilot Study Finds Bacterial Vaginosis Self-Test Effective

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A self-test for vaginosis may enable women to accurately diagnose the condition and results in women seeking professional diagnosis and treatment, according to a study in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ulipristal Acetate Found Effective Emergency Contraception

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For women who require emergency contraception, ulipristal acetate may be an effective alternative to levonorgestrel, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rural and Urban Care Quality Compared for CAD

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for variables, hospital quality of care for coronary artery disease (CAD) in rural areas is on a par with care in urban areas, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Packed Lunches Measured Against School Meal Criteria

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lunches that British children bring to school from home typically fall short of the standards for meals that schools provide, according to research published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Policies on Newborn Hospital Discharge Updated

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The length of the hospital stay for healthy term newborns should be based on a range of factors unique to each mother-child pair, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

More Patient Surveillance Needed to Reduce Nurse Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is common for nurses to commit errors in the course of their work, and nurse educators are urged to improve training in strategies to improve patient surveillance, according to a study in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Shown to Impact Incontinence Severity

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women with urinary incontinence have more severe symptoms than their overweight or normal weight counterparts, according to trial results published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Supported by Evidence

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Psychodynamic psychotherapy, the treatment approach similar to, but less extensive than, full psychoanalysis, is efficacious and well-supported by scientific evidence, despite a perception that it lacks empirical support, according to an article published online Jan. 25 in the American Psychologist.

Full Text

Study Compares Methods of Measuring Contractions

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In women going through induced or augmented labor, monitoring contractions with an intrauterine pressure catheter doesn't reduce the rate of operative delivery compared to external monitoring, according to research published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antibiotic Use for Acute Otitis Media Assessed

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A well-publicized clinical practice guideline in 2004 on acute otitis media (AOM) in children did not appear to increase the management of the problem without antibiotics, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Premature Births Not Reduced With Omega-3 Fatty Acids

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Among pregnant women with a history of premature delivery already taking 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate to reduce the risk of premature delivery, omega-3 fatty acids provide no additional benefit, according to a study in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Looks at Effect of Smoke on Infant Heart Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Early exposure to cigarette smoke may lead to a persistent reprogramming of infant blood pressure control mechanisms, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Syringe Recalled Because of Defective Needle

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- According to a Jan. 21 press release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Nipro Medical Corporation has voluntarily recalled all of its GlucoPro Insulin Syringes because of a defect that may cause the needle to detach from the syringe, resulting in its being stuck in the insulin vial, pushed back into the syringe, or lodged in the patient's skin.

Safety Alert
Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Car Crash Trauma Often Under-Detected in Elderly

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are often under-triaged and inappropriately treated for injuries that go undetected, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Later Toilet Training Linked to Childhood Urge Incontinence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Beginning toilet training in toddlers after the age of 32 months may increase the likelihood of later urge incontinence, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Pediatric Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Electrocardiogram in Field Can Benefit Heart Attack Response

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suspected of having a heart attack have a shorter door-to-balloon (D2B) time and are able to start reperfusion therapy faster if they have an electrocardiogram (ECG) taken in the field by emergency response personnel rather than in the hospital, according to a study in the Feb. 1 issue of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Prescribing and Administration Errors Assessed

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Errors in written prescription and administration of drugs on pediatric wards are common and warrant strategies to reduce the risk of serious harm, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Full Text

Disease Now Main Cause of Death in Darfur Conflict

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2005, disease has replaced violence as the leading cause of death in Darfur, especially among displaced populations, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Degree of Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity increases the risk of stroke independently of race and gender, although the risk appears to be largely explained by associated hypertension and diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Red Yeast Rice Efficacy Comparable to Statin

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The alternative therapy red yeast rice performs comparably to the lipid-lowering drug pravastatin in reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in patients who had previously had to discontinue statin therapy because of muscle pain, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nurse Education Can Improve Elderly Pain Monitoring

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Barriers to timely documentation must be addressed and specific training given if nurses are to adhere to best practice in reporting patients' pain levels before and after analgesic treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Higher Rate Than Estimated of H1N1 in U.K. Children

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, children were much more vulnerable to infection than older people and, therefore, should be the primary target group for vaccination, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Factors Help Predict Continued Opioid Use for Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic back pain are more likely to use opioid analgesics long term if they smoke and had non-surgical treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Transcatheter Aortic Procedure Assessed in High-Risk Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), using either transfemoral or transapical approaches, produces similar mortality, and both are viable alternatives for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at too high a risk for surgery, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Triple, Dual Restenosis Prevention Therapies Studied

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Antiplatelet therapy including aspirin, clopidogrel and cilostazol helps prevent late stenosis following stent placement better than standard therapy with only aspirin and clopidogrel, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nurses Often Deeply Affected by Workplace Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses are deeply affected by errors they make in the intraoperative environment and need more guidance on what constitutes an error in order to encourage more open reporting, according to a study in the Jan. 10 issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coronary Events Not Uncommon on Vacation Cruises

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Passengers embarking on cruises who are at risk for cardiovascular events should have a pre-cruise medical evaluation and bring along a copy of their electrocardiogram if abnormal, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treatments Linked to Lower Risk of C. difficile Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of two monoclonal antibodies targeting Clostridium difficile toxins was associated with fewer recurrences of infections, according to research published in the Jan. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Reducing Dietary Salt Could Substantially Impact Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest reductions in Americans' dietary salt could substantially reduce cardiovascular events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke, and should be a public health goal, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Diabetes Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Lung Diseases

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The declining lung function of patients with diabetes puts them at increased risk of a range of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia and asthma, but not lung cancer, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Risk Criteria Help Guide Care for Infants With Fever

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In most cases, infants with fever who meet low-risk criteria should be closely observed but may not require antibiotics, sparing associated adverse events, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Serotonin-1A Receptor Gene Linked to Depression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model, researchers were able to manipulate the level of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors to affect both the mice's vulnerability to stress as well as their response to antidepressants, according to a study in the Jan. 14 issue of Neuron.

Abstract
Full Text

Cognitive Fluctuations May Predict Alzheimer's Severity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the presence of cognitive fluctuations, spontaneous alterations in cognition, attention, and arousal, may be associated with greater disease severity and poorer neuropsychological performance, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Researchers Call for Reform of Opioid Prescription Practices

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving higher doses of prescribed opioids for chronic pain, overdoses are common, suggesting a need to reform prescribing practices, according to a study in the Jan. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Diary More Flexible Than Carbohydrate Counting

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new telemedicine system is as effective and more flexible than standard carbohydrate counting in treating adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metformin May Worsen Peripheral Neuropathy

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin treatment of type 2 diabetes is associated with vitamin B12 deficiency and more severe peripheral neuropathy, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Poor Cognition in Midlife

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome that persists over years is associated with worse cognitive function in late middle age, which can be partially accounted for by occupational position, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Number of People Infected by H1N1 Reaches 55 Million

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- On Jan. 15, federal officials reported that, from mid-April through mid-December, an estimated 55 million people in the United States were infected with H1N1 influenza, including approximately 11,200 who died.

CDC MMWR
H1N1 Estimates

Antipsychotic Use in Elderly, Prescribing Rates Examined

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients newly admitted to nursing homes are more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics if the nursing home has a high prescribing rate for antipsychotics, according to a study in the Jan. 11 Archives of Internal Medicine. A related study determined that an FDA advisory on the use of atypical antipsychotics in elderly dementia patients resulted in decreased use.

Abstract - Chen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Dorsey
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

Rituximab May Adversely Affect Immune Function

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treatment with rituximab may adversely affect the response to vaccines, according to two studies in the January issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract - Bingham
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - van Assen
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Rates of Overweight and Obesity May Be Stabilizing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although the prevalence of overweight and obesity is still high in adults and children in the United States, the rates appear to be stabilizing in the past decade, according to two studies published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Flegal
Full Text - Flegal
Abstract - Ogden
Full Text - Ogden
Editorial

Reduced-Energy Meals May Under-State Energy Content

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Meals sold as reduced energy by supermarkets and restaurants may under-state the caloric content by a significant amount, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychotherapy May Help Prevent Teenage Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) may help adolescent girls who are at risk for obesity to avoid excess weight gain, according to a study in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combination Approach Found to Aid Knee Osteoarthritis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Both strength training and self-management are helpful to treat middle-aged patients with early knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Cesareans Recommended Only When Medically Necessary

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Cesarean sections should only be performed when there is a medical need, as those done without good reason raise the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Calcium Linked to Different Effects in Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Both long-term hypercalcemia and short-term hypocalcemia are associated with higher mortality in men with non-dialysis-dependent (NDD) chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Caffeine Linked to Reduced Hepatic Fibrosis

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increased coffee consumption may protect against advanced liver fibrosis, especially in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study in the January issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Imaging Groups Issue Breast Screening Recommendations

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Citing gaps in existing guidelines, the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) issued recommendations for the use of mammography, MRI, and other imaging approaches for breast cancer screening in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Simple 'Cough Trick' Helps Children Cope With Shots

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A simple intervention in which children cough at the moment of needle puncture during routine vaccinations may reduce the perception of pain by some children, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drink May Improve Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease show improvements in memory after taking a multi-nutrient drink designed to improve synapse formation, according to a study in the January issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

First Few Weeks Most Critical After Joint Replacement

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing hip or knee replacement have a small but increased risk of death that persists for about 26 days after surgery, according to a study in the Jan. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Childhood Cancer Survivor Cardiovascular Risk Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased cardiovascular risk as they age if they were treated with full-body or torso irradiation or are physically inactive, according to a study in the January Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Weight Linked to Response to Weight-Loss Solicitations

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who believe they have weight problems were more likely to open "spam" e-mails regarding weight loss and buy products from them, according to research published in the January issue of the Southern Medical Journal.

Full Text

Right Restraint Use Key for Children's Car Safety

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- There is a population-level benefit to interventions aimed at improving the rate of children's restraint use in cars, with promotion of age-appropriate restraints yielding the greatest benefits, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Survey Looks at Breast Cancer Surgeon Practice, Patient Care

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Many breast cancer surgeons do not conform to optimal patient and practice management processes related to clinical information, patient decision support and quality of care, according to a study in the January issue of Medical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Impact of Depression on Work Performance Measured

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Employees with depression are more likely to have time off from work and have impaired work performance, according to a study in the January/February issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nurse Visits in Infancy May Lead to Less Criminal Behavior

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The female children of young, low-income women have better educational and economic prospects, and are less likely to commit crimes, if they receive nurse visits during infancy, according to a follow-up study in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Skin Preparations Decrease Risk of Surgical-Site Infections

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Simple preoperative skin preparations may significantly reduce the risk of surgical-site infections, according to two studies in the Jan. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Bode
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Darouiche
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

2010 Childhood Vaccination Schedules Approved

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations for childhood and adolescent immunization schedules have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, incorporating several changes from last year, according to an article published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

www.vaers.hhs.gov
Abstract
Full Text
Immunization Charts

Self-Efficacy May Affect Patients' Levels of Fatigue

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors (BCS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are likely to report less fatigue as a result of physical activity if they have a strong sense of self-efficacy and are not depressed, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tea Drinking May Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Tea drinking, in particular drinking green tea, can reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, according to a meta-analysis reported in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2010 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: January 2010 Briefing - Neurology Next: January 2010 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.